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Archive for the category “Aid”

United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) appeals for US$180 million to respond to children’s immediate needs in South Sudan (05.12.2019)

In 2020, UNICEF is expecting an increase in number of children suffering from acute malnutrition, increasing from 860,000 in 2019 to 1.3 million in 2020.

JUBA, South Sudan, December 5, 2019 – 4.1 million children will need urgent assistance in South Sudan in 2020. Years of conflict have destroyed critical infrastructure hindering access to basic services such as clean water, health care and education. Gender-based violence is prevalent and unaccompanied children are at risk of exploitation and abuse. The unresolved political conflict and lack of essential services prevents displaced people from returning home to rebuild their lives.At the same time, the floods affecting 78 counties across the country, have devastated crops making an already difficult food situation worse. Critical infrastructure, including schools and health centres, will need to be rebuilt when the water subsides. In 2020, UNICEF is expecting an increase in number of children suffering from acute malnutrition, increasing from 860,000 in 2019 to 1.3 million in 2020. This includes 292,000 children under five years of age suffering from severe acute malnutrition.

UNICEF is appealing for US$180 million to respond to the most immediate needs of women and children in South Sudan the coming year.

“How can we expect children to grow if the water they are drinking is makes them sick?’’ asked UNICEF South Sudan Representative, Dr Mohamed Ag Ayoya. “While the country is struggling with finding a sustainable and peaceful solution to the conflict, our focus remains on the future which means the children of South Sudan.”

In 2019, UNICEF and partners were able to treat 186,000 children for severe acute malnutrition, provide clean water to some 460,000 people, delivered education to 610,000 children and vaccinated over 430,000 children against measles. Meanwhile, the overall humanitarian funding in South Sudan decreased. For 2019, UNICEF appealed for US$179 million, by end of August just over half was funded. This hampered UNICEF’s efforts to respond to the needs of women and children, including supporting demobilization of children from armed forces and groups and provide water and sanitation to some of the most vulnerable people in the country.

“The only thing that I am 100 per cent sure of is that the children growing up in South Sudan cannot be blamed for the situation in the country. Yet, they are paying the highest price – with their futures,” said UNICEF South Sudan Representative, Dr Mohamed Ag Ayoya. “If we want to see a prosperous South Sudan, we need to continue to invest in the current and coming generation of children, ensuring they are not only surviving but thriving. For that we need all partners and all donors to join in.”

In 2020, UNICEF is aiming at:

  • 268,045 children under five years of age treated for severe acute malnutrition
  • 518,000 children vaccinated against measles
  • 340,000 pregnant women and children provide with mosquito nets
  • 817,000 people have access to safe water and 303,500 people have access to safe and appropriate sanitation facilities
  • 127,000 reached with psychosocial support
  • 709,000 children accessing quality formal or non-formal education
  • 2,500 teachers trained on education
  • 42,030 households reached through the cash transfer programme

World Food Programme expands emergency operation in Zimbabwe as drought and economic hardship plunge millions into hunger (03.12.2019)

Funds are required immediately if WFP is to meet the growing needs of the hardest-hit Zimbabweans.

HARARE, Zimbabwe, December 3, 2019 – The World Food Programme (WFP) is rapidly expanding an already sizeable emergency operation in Zimbabwe where drought, flooding and macro-economic meltdown have plunged 7.7 million people – half the population – into severe hunger.Funds are required immediately if WFP is to meet the growing needs of the hardest-hit Zimbabweans.  It plans to more than double the number of people it is helping by January to 4.1 million, providing life-saving rations of cereal, pulses and vegetable oil and a protective nutrition ration for children under 5 years of age.

“We’re deep into a vicious cycle of sky-rocketing malnutrition that’s hitting women and children hardest and will be tough to break,” said WFP Executive Director David Beasley. “With poor rains forecast yet again in the run-up to the main harvest in April, the scale of hunger in the country is going to get worse before it gets better.”

Zimbabwe’s hunger crisis – the worst for more than a decade – is part of an unprecedented climate-driven disaster gripping southern Africa. Temperatures in the region are rising at more than twice the average global rate and ever more erratic rainy seasons are hitting the country’s subsistence farmers hard.

The crisis is being exacerbated by a dire shortage of foreign currency, runaway inflation, mounting unemployment, lack of fuel, prolonged power outages and large-scale livestock losses, afflicting urban residents and rural villagers alike.

WFP’s planned scale-up is a huge logistical undertaking, with the limited availability of Zimbabwean dollars and surging prices for basics presaging a near wholesale switch from cash assistance to food distributions.

It envisages the sourcing, purchase and delivery to the land-locked country of more than 240,000 metric tons of commodities through June, a challenge all the more daunting because drought and flooding have eroded food supplies across much of Africa.

An estimated US$293 million is required for WFP’s emergency response with less than 30 percent of that sum secured.

“We must not let our immediate focus on emergency aid distract us from investing in the resilience programs that will help chronically hungry people cope with the ever-more severe impacts of erratic weather,” Beasley said. “We urge the international community to step up funding to address the root causes of long-term hunger in Zimbabwe.” 

Sudan: UN humanitarian chief calls for urgent support to Sudan to address the most acute humanitarian needs (24.11.2019)

Zimbabwe: Press Statement on China’s Bilateral Support to Zimbabwe (20.11.2019)

Opinion: Museveni used to be a darling of the West…

When I read that people have trouble that Robert Kyagulanyi aka Bobi Wine is liked in the West for his ideals and his vision. They shouldn’t forget that the West named President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni as a “new breed” together with President Paul Kagame in the mid-90s. It is a few decades ago and seems like a lost time. But, it is not so far away from the current time were in now.

When I read that National Resistance Movement (NRM) hard-liners and apologists says Bobi Wine is to loved in the West. The NRM wouldn’t have stabilized the economy, wouldn’t have had some economic growth or ability to built successive big-programs back-in-the-day, if it wasn’t a donor darling. The NRM wouldn’t have done this on Qaddafi funds nor the North Korean training of military brigades.

If Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton and other Americans like John McCain didn’t have a soft-spot for the proxy armies of Museveni. He wouldn’t get as much funds, military support and so-on over the years in power. That’s why the same gentlemen fuzzing about Bobi Wine amplifying the diaspora, going and getting support in North America.

Should remember how Janet Museveni was stuck in Sweden during the bush-war. How the NRA tried to get support from the United Kingdom during the Bush-War. They finally got some help, reluctantly from Libya. They will not speak highly of that today, but that is a fact.

That’s why its hypocritical of Museveni and the NRM to say Bobi Wine isn’t legit, because he has support from the West. That’s because Museveni isn’t an donor darling of the West any-more. He was during the battle against the Lord Resistance Army (LRA), countering HIV/AIDs and so-on. Also the build-up of the Universal Primary Education (UPE) in the 1990s. This is all well-known now.

However, the NRM people will come with daggers, swords and harsh words for endorsements from Americans now. But they was all praise and giggly like teenagers around pop-stars, when their President and the NRM was praised by the West back-in-the-day. For all achievements, the following of policies pushed by the World Bank and International Monetary Funds. Therefore, the NRM and Museveni should look at Bobi Wine and wish it still was them. Not act like they didn’t enjoy the limelight back when.

So, when people bitch about the endorsement. Just look back at how Museveni enjoyed the love from Bill Clinton and others. It was fine when he did it and even postponed elections while being praised. Even supported the insurgencies in the DRC and Rwanda, by the same foreigners. Therefore, the NRM and Museveni should remember they used to be the darling, but is now a bitter EX.

They are like Kenzo, who still wish they had the love of Rema. But they have lost it, because of the cheating and lies. The deception and playing the guards wrongly. Even as long as the NRM and the army fights the battle the US doesn’t want in Somalia. They are still not as loved as they used too. That’s why Bobi Wine is a threat there too. Because, his a new darling and the NRM cannot accept that. Peace.

World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Director visits Sudan to meet new government and sends off first barges to South Sudan (22.10.2019)

On his visit to Kosti, Beasley saw the three WFP-contracted barges loading 4,500 tons of food procured locally in Sudan.

KHARTOUM, Sudan, October 22, 2019 – The Executive Director of the UN World Food Programme (WFP) David Beasley, today concluded a two-day visit to Sudan where he met leaders of the new government and travelled to Kosti to waive off the first three barges to carry humanitarian food supplies down the River Nile to South Sudan since 2011.

“This is a new dawn for Sudan, a Sudan that can positively impact the future of the whole region,” said David Beasley, Executive Director of the World Food Programme after meeting the Sudanese Prime Minister, Abdalla Hamdok. “WFP has been a long-time partner to the Sudanese people, and we’re ready to support the government and the people during this historic moment.”

On his visit to Kosti, Beasley saw the three WFP-contracted barges loading 4,500 tons of food procured locally in Sudan. They then sailed upriver to the South Sudanese towns of Renk, Malakal and Bor. These food supplies are enough to feed 370,000 people for one month. River transport of humanitarian goods between Sudan and South Sudan largely stopped when the border closed after South Sudan’s independence in 2011.

The resumption of river transport was made possible by collaboration between the two governments and a recognition by all parties that the transport of humanitarian assistance is vital to conflict-affected civilians in South Sudan.

Transporting goods up the Nile is cost-effective and provides an alternative to road transport between the two countries – important in the rainy season when roads can become blocked.

WFP has delivered a total of 265,000 tons of humanitarian assistance across land borders to South Sudan since 2014.

This was David Beasley’s second visit to the country since he assumed leadership of WFP in April 2017. During his visit, Beasley also met the Chairman of the Sovereign Council, Lt. Gen. Abdel Fattah Abdelrahman Burhan; Deputy Chairman of the Sudan Sovereign Council, Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Hemeti; and the Ministers of Foreign Affairs, Agriculture, Labour and Social Development and the Deputy Minister of Finance where he discussed Sudan’s historic transition and the need to expand humanitarian access across the country.

South Sudan: Troika Statement, October 2019 (21.10.2019)

The text of the following statement was issued jointly by the governments of the United States, Norway, and the United Kingdom:

South Sudan faces a critical moment in the journey toward a peaceful and prosperous future. There are now less than four weeks for political leaders to form a transitional government as they committed to in the Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan. The United States, the United Kingdom, and Norway (the Troika) have consistently welcomed assurances by the parties to implement the agreement and meet its deadlines, and hoped that recent meetings between South Sudan’s leadership show a renewed spirit of cooperation. We commend the actions of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) to broker the agreement and maintain momentum and take hope from the continued reduction in overall violence in South Sudan.

For too long, conflict has been waged at the expense of South Sudan’s most vulnerable and continues to exacerbate humanitarian needs. We encourage the parties, especially the current government, to take concrete steps to build trust through enhanced cooperation. With the November 12 deadline looming, extended from May, much more needs to be done urgently to ensure the success of the transitional government. Progress would help maintain the confidence of all the parties and the international community, demonstrate that the parties have the political will to work together during the transitional period, and provide the opportunity for the international community to engage productively with an inclusive, new government.

We welcome the discussions of IGAD countries in Addis Ababa last week; the region and the international community’s investment and engagement in a peaceful South Sudan remains important. The Troika will continue to stand with and support the people of South Sudan, who want and deserve peace and a government that that protects its people. We urge the South Sudanese parties to meet the November 12 deadline to form a transitional government that will enable the conditions for a constructive relationship during the next phase of South Sudan’s peace process. The UNSC visit to South Sudan offers an opportunity for the international community to discuss with South Sudanese leaders how to accelerate such progress.

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Uganda Paediatric Association: Press Release (16.10.2019)

UNHCR aids thousands of Congolese refugees returning home from Angola (08.10.2019)

UNHCR is providing returnees with transport, as well as cash assistance to help them reintegrate.

GENEVA, Switzerland, October 8, 2019 – This is a summary of what was said by UNHCR spokesperson Charlie Yaxley – to whom quoted text may be attributed – at today’s press briefing at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

Thousands of Congolese refugees are returning from Angola to the Kasai region in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), where fighting amongst armed groups has lessened and security conditions have improved.

The first group of a few hundred people will return as part of a voluntary repatriation, which will officially being this week, following the signing on 23 August of a tripartite agreement between UNHCR and the Governments of Angola and DRC on voluntary returns.

In total, more than 4,000 refugees are expected to be assisted to return home in the coming weeks. UNHCR is providing returnees with transport, as well as cash assistance to help them reintegrate.

Meanwhile, since 18 August, some 12,000 Congolese refugees, including nearly 7,000 children, have spontaneously returned home from the Lovua settlement in Angola’s Lunda Norte province. UNHCR is grateful to the Angolan authorities for swiftly providing the returnees with trucks to assist them with their journey back to DRC.

Many of those returning spontaneously are facing extremely challenging living conditions. UNHCR is providing them with cash assistance, as well as humanitarian aid together with provincial authorities and NGO partners, at the border town of Kalamba Mbuji, where UNHCR has set up an emergency transit centre.

Similar assistance is also being provided to returnees who have reached Kananga, the capital of Kasai Central province.

Although fighting amongst armed groups has calmed, some refugees are still uncertain about the condition in which they will find their homes. Some are unwilling to return to their homes and are moving elsewhere, as they fear a return of inter-ethnic violence.

Public infrastructure, such as schools and health centers, have been badly damaged during multiple periods of fighting and are yet to be repaired. Existing facilities lack the capacity to meet all of the needs of returnees.

UNHCR continues to support the Government of DRC’s efforts to provide and restore basic services, and to promote social cohesion and reintegration efforts. UNHCR, through our partner War Child UK, is also conducting protection monitoring in Kananga and surrounding areas to identify and profile protection concerns, and ensure adequate responses.

However, massive financial support is needed from the international community, to humanitarian organisations and to the Government of DRC, to create sustainable conditions for returnees.

Current levels of funding are far below the amount needed to allow for a major rebuilding programme. For 2019, UNHCR has received just 57 per cent of US$150 million needed to help people affected by the DRC crisis.

Somalia Partnership Forum: Communique (02.10.2019)

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