Opinion: Muntu’s Grand Illusion

We have no illusions that we or any other opposition actor can stop General Museveni from the abuse of national resources during the electoral process. He is already doing so. We also have no illusions that there will be a level playing ground in the 2021 electoral process. Our understanding is that no dictatorial regime ever creates a level playing field. Our participation in 2021 is therefore not going to be based on any expectation that the political playing ground is going to be level. That there will be a transparent, free and fair election. Our participation will be from the understanding that we can only overwhelm the regime from a position of superior organization. That is why we focus all our efforts on getting well organized. We know for sure that when you are well organized and disciplined you can overwhelm such a regime in spite of all the odds ranged against you” – Mugisha Muntu (Black Star News publisher Milton Allimadi’s Q-and-A with Mugisha Muntu – ‘Mugisha Muntu’s Beyond Regime-Change Vision: How ANT Wants to transform political culture in Uganda’ 31.01.2020).

By all means, there is a need for a change in the Republic. No one would deny that. Not a single soul would deny the need or hesitate to pursuit that mission. However, the National Coordinator and the founder of Alliance for National Transformation (ANT) Mugisha Muntu hollow point is coming across.

His been a political operative for so long. He knows this game, his been through his share of elections. Therefore, him speaking about it, he has the authority. However, the hollow points and the lacklustre ideals has to be addressed. Because, does he believe it himself? That he got the spirit, the drive and the vision to build this from the ground up?

What difference will his organizational skills be from Amama Mbabazi? Why will ANT matter more than Go-Forward. Not like he has had decades building a team, hold meetings and consult across the Republic. Not like ANT has an office space in every major town or has the ability to spread their message to every single individual. No, its like wishing for greatness, but not having the ability.

Muntu wants the change, he speaks of it, but only wants it his way. A mediocre and a lack of courage. He thinks building his own entity and his own brand will change the day. The “Country Before Self”. Even if he himself was himself before party. It’s a reason the whole operation is hallow just by that alone.

Mugisha Muntu might speak game, but if he really believed in this, why isn’t ANT everywhere and that his delegations on rotation to every single district of the Republic? Why are they not speaking loudly?

Why isn’t Muntu on Frontline or NTV Uganda more often? Showing his face and speaking his message of change through his operation and his party? Seemingly, he should be in people’s faces and on the radio. However, his a ghost and the machinery he has is like it too.

That is why its a grand illusion, that his ANTs will do it. It might be a clever to make Muntu relevant and has a new day job. But, for now he will not be the microphone that catch the attention nor spark fury for change. His more of the weak tea moderate, who would wait to trade favours for a pot of gold. Peace.

Cameroon: South-West Region – Fako Divison – Prefectoral Order 32/2020 (31.01.2020)

Malawi: Statement by His Excellency Emmerson Dambudzo Mnangagwa, President of the Republic of Zimbabwe and Chairperson of the SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation, 31st January 2020 (31.01.2020)

Zimbabwe: Government Solidarity Message to the People’s Republic of China (31.01.2020)

Mali: Le President de la Republique – Decret No. 0034 – Insituant l’Operation “Maliko” (30.01.2020)

RDC: ACAJ a lettre de à l’Admnistrateur Général de l’ANR – Concerne: Plaidoyer pur la liberation de 4 activistes pro-democratie Mouvement MISS/RDC (31.01.2020)

Kenya Tuitakayo Movement rejects the Turn Over Tax aka ‘Mama Mboga Tax’ (31.01.2020)

Guinee: Front National pour la Defense de la Constitution (FNDC) – Communique No. 059 (30.01.2020)

Government and donors enable WFP to assist 1.2 million refugees and build local economies in Uganda (31.01.2020)

KAMPALA – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) commends the Government of Uganda and all its donors for helping it to contribute to the basic food needs of 1.2 million refugees and their host communities across the country in 2019.

Donors and the Government of Uganda supported WFP to meet the basic dietary needs of refugees through monthly food or cash transfers. In addition, donors funded the treatment and prevention of malnutrition among refugees and Ugandans living around refugee settlements.

WFP was also able to support smallholder farmers to improve their yields and incomes while reducing food losses.

“The partnership between government, donors and WFP is vital to fight hunger and malnutrition in Uganda,” said El-Khidir Daloum, WFP Country Director. “The ability of donors to swiftly provide funding and entrust us to deliver assistance to those seeking refuge —often women and children fleeing unimaginable hardships—needs our heartfelt recognition.”

In 2019, WFP’s refugee operation received contributions from Uganda, Canada, the European Commission, Ireland, Japan, Sweden, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, the UN Central Emergency Response Fund and the United States of America.

Donors enabled WFP to help boost economies within Uganda by purchasing food locally. In addition, WFP strengthened its food and cash distribution procedures, including using biometrics to confirm identities in order to improve the accountability and integrity of the refugee response.

The government and donors helped WFP to expand cash-based transfers, reaching 35 percent of all refugees assisted. Cash allows refugees to choose what food they buy and stimulates economic growth in and around settlements. Cash also boosts government efforts to enhance financial inclusion.

Through cash-based transfers, WFP injected US$35 million into refugee settlements in 2019.

At the end of 2019, Uganda hosted 1.38 million refugees— the highest number of refugees in Africa. More than 67,300 refugees arrived from the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan between July and December. Women and people under the age of 18 make up 83 percent of refugees.

They typically arrive in Uganda with little to no assets, leaving them heavily dependent on assistance. A WFP and government study in 2017 found that even while the government gives land and the UN and other organizations provide additional assistance, refugees remain vulnerable for years.

By meeting their basic food and nutrition needs, WFP and its partners enable refugees to begin a journey toward self-reliance and resilience in line with Uganda’s refugee policy.

Donors to WFP’s relief and development work in Uganda to support refugees and host communities in 2019 were: Canada (US$562,000), the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department (US$16 million), Ireland (US$2.3 million), Japan (US$2 million), the Republic of Korea (US$7 million of oil and rice), Russia (US$1.5 million), Sweden (US$1.7 million), Uganda (US$2.7 million of rice), the United Kingdom (US$56 million), the UN Central Emergency Response Fund (US$3.5 million) and the United States of America (US$110.6 million).

Contributions also came from multilateral (US$2 million) and private donors (US$306,400).

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The United Nations World Food Programme is the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies, building prosperity and supporting a sustainable future for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change.