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Brexit: The Tories-DUP will continue to subdue the nation with no publications on their negotiations!

If you are confused about what is at stake or in consideration from the United Kingdom government or the Conservative Party and Democratic Unionist Party (Tories-DUP) government, than it is now by intent. Since, the latest revelation from the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union Robin Walker, have a few brilliantly to a few MPs where he described their level of transparency and accountability, which is far by none! They do not want the world to know, if anyone knows or knew what the plan was for the Tories when they left the European Union. It is amazing, that the United Kingdom are playing at this level. That they have so little touch and wish to inform own citizens of their outcome and possible plan of discontinuing their role as a Member State.

Mr. David Lammy asked on the 5th September:

“To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what plans his Department has to publish studies into the effect of the UK leaving the EU on different sectors of the UK economy” (Parliament.uk, 13.09.2017).

Today, Robin Walker answered it by:

“It is not standard practice to provide an ongoing commentary on internal analytical work that is being carried out within government. The Government’s plan for leaving the EU has been discussed at length, and Parliament will have a say on the final deal we achieve with the European Union by putting that deal to a vote in both Houses before it comes into force. But as Parliament has also agreed, we will not publish anything that would undermine our ability to negotiate the best deal for the UK” (Parliament.uk, 13.09.2017).

Mr. John Trickett asked on the 5th September:

“To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many civil servants have been sent to Brussels at any point to engage in the detail of the Brexit negotiation talks; and how many of these have been seconded from outside the Government” (Parliament.uk, 13.09.2017).

Today, Robin Walker answered it by:

“We have released information on the UK’s senior negotiating team on Gov.uk. As an indication of the number of civil servants in attendance at negotiations in Brussels, at the second round we had over 90 civil servants in attendance, and for the third round, over 100. The total number of staff will vary from round to round as we deploy the negotiating team best able to work on the issues under negotiation. We are drawing together expertise from a wide range of departments where there is specific relevant knowledge on the issues to be negotiated” (…) “I can confirm that of the Department for Exiting the European Union staff who attended the negotiations in July and August, none were seconded from outside of Government. We do not hold information on the contractual arrangements of individuals from other Government Departments” (Parliament.uk, 13.09.2017).

These answers are clearly not enlightening, but are showing the contempt of the Parliament, the Representatives and the citizens as a whole, Brexit negotiators wish to work in secrecy and in peace, without interference, as the knowledge of their plans are hidden in the shadows and not in the open. It is weird, it is strange that the United Kingdom does it like this. That the Brexit team and the ones working for the government want to hold it like a corporate secret. Instead of being open and transparent. Therefore, if the British does not trust their government act in their interests. I understand, because there is nothing to trust. The Tories-DUP government are holding them in contempt and not caring for the people need to know what they are up too. This is not an easy food run, if you bring takeaway Chinese or a Pizza!

This is the ending of a long term Membership Status and all the dozens of agreements that has been made, together with law and protocol for trading and travelling, that has to be reissued and reassured to secure both Unions. Clearly, the Tories and their Secretary thinks it is okay to not publish information, since it can damage their cause. Nevertheless, their cause of action should be in public, since it is in public interest. So if Banks and Industry moves now, they are justified, they do not know their terms for staying behind. London Financial Centre could just move to Dublin or Frankfurt. There the big-multinational financial institutions could secure new benefits within the Euro-Zone. Not be dependent on random guesses of negotiations of the Tories-DUP in Brussels.

That is what can be stated today, that the Brexit department plans to keep it in secret and do not want to be transparent. They want to be secret and neglect their duty to serve the people and their interests. The businesses has all rights to move shop, since if it is all done in secrecy, who will benefit and what will be the end-game? Who knows, right?

Robin Walker, has opened the eyes of hopefully many, if not the Brexit negotiations will be rockier, since the people and corporations cannot trust their government. They have no rights to now, when they do not publish needed public information. Tories-DUP are playing hide-and-seek. We do not know if their hidden or if they are seeking. They could do both. What we do know, is that they do this for a purpose, and that they do not trust the public will to accept their craft, their framework and the possible arrangements they are creating after the Membership with the European Union. Peace

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President Museveni on Radio-Tour to explain either [Land Amendment] or (Land Grab) 101!

In the coming days near you, if you listen to the radio-channels of Voice of Kigezi, Radio West, Voice of Tooro ,Spice FM, Point FM and Radio Buddu. From today at 19:00 Uganda Time, the radio will filled with reasoning of Mr. President, His Excellency President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni. Who for the moment are still trying to figure out a way of spoiling his own age and birthday, but that is for another day.

Right now he is on a quest to prove the validity and reasoning behind the Land Amendment in the 10th Parliament. The reason for the government sudden need to take more power and have the capacity to take land away from the current landowners and titles from the locals. That without following the current provisions and compensations for land. Because that is hassle, the state needs it for cheap. That is why the President will go on tour explaining, the brilliant legal scholar of Kahinda Otafiire and his minions. So that the people who listens will understand, that the reasonable theft of their livelihood is for the common good and that is just to follow the Don, follow the President no matter what. Here is the amendment in question!

“Amendment of Article 26:

“(3) Where the owner of property or any person having any interest in or right over property objects to the compensation awarded under a law made under clause (2Xb), the Government or local government shall deposit with court for the property owner or any person having any interest in or right over the property, the compensation awarded for the property, and the Government or local government shall take possession of the property pending determination by the court of any dispute relating to the compensation” (Otafiire, 2017).

“(4) The owner of property or person having any interest in or right over the property shall have a right to access the compensation deposited with the court referred to in clause (3),at any time during the determination of the dispute” (Otafiire, 2017).

“(5) Parliament shall, by law, prescribe the time within which any dispute referred to in clause (3) shall be determined” (Otafiire, 2017).

This provision of the law is not to make it better, by law it makes the state more powerful and the frugal mind can possess the land and develop on it. They will take the laws in their hands and make sure the developers get easier access, without having to make sure the facilitation or the boundaries are kept, in this spirit this quick transition is made for less transparent system and for more land grabbing in the hands of cronyism and of the state. This will only benefit the elite and the ones who wants to build sugar factories and plantations, without having to care for the locals, who has been living on the land for generations.

The speeches and his words, better be stellar, his lies better be sufficient and his stamina, better be top notch. Since, the way he will explain this otherwise, will be disastrous, since in the grand scheme of things. This is taking the hand that feeds districts and beating them with a stick. He better, come with some sort of play and some sort of argument that makes cow shit, look like chocolate. Because that what he needed be. Nothing else, just which, he needs to sprinkle the cow-shit and call it hot-fudge sundae. There is nothing else to do. Peace.

 

Reference:

Otafiire, Kahinda – ‘Constitutional Amendment Bill of 2017’ – 08.06.2017 – Uganda Gazette No. 33, Volume CX, Bill Supplement No. 7

Food insecurity soars in conflict-ridden Democratic Republic of Congo (14.08.2017)

Around 7.7 million people require urgent humanitarian assistance, FAO and WFP warn.

ROME, Italy, August 14, 2017 – Amid rising violence and displacement in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), 7.7 million people face acute hunger – a 30 percent increase over the last year, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Food Programme (WFP) warned today in a new report.

According to the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) analysis released today, between June 2016 and June 2017, the number of people in “emergency” and  “crisis” levels of food insecurity (IPC Phase 4 and 3) – which precede “famine” levels on the IPC scale – and requiring urgent humanitarian food assistance  rose by 1.8 million, from 5.9 million to 7.7 million.

This means that more than one in ten people living in rural areas suffer from acute hunger.

Hunger is on the rise due to escalating and prolonged conflict and displacement in central and eastern DRC, mainly in the Kasaï and Tanganyika regions, where there has been widespread violence. Some 1.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes over the past year.

The report noted that the humanitarian situation has been exacerbated by the spread of fall armyworm infestations and cholera and measles outbreaks.

In conflict-ridden areas, over 1.5 million people are facing “emergency” levels of food insecurity (IPC Phase 4) according to the IPC report, which means people are forced to sell everything they have and skip or reduce their meals.

“In conflict-ridden areas, farmers have seen their villages and fields pillaged. They have not been able to plant for the last two seasons. There is a lack of local markets providing for their food needs. Conflict toppled with armyworm infestations destroying crops in over a quarter of the country’s vast territories are devastating for rural communities. The situation is set to get worse if urgent support does not come in time,” said Alexis Bonte, FAO Representative ad interim in DRC.

“Farmers, especially those displaced – majority women and children – desperately need urgent food aid but also means to sustain themselves, such as tools and seeds so that they can resume farming. Many of the displaced women lost their husbands. Farming, for them, is a way to get back on their feet, and face the future with dignity and hope,” added Bonte.

Coping with acute hunger

Between 50 to 80 percent of people in some of the areas affected by hunger struggle to make ends meet and to have something to eat. In several areas, people only eat once a day, and their meals – based on corn, cassava or potatoes – do not meet their daily nutritional and calorie needs. Food prices have been rising for the last three months. In some cases, diets are limited to starches and leaves.

Others have to resort to reducing or skipping meals, selling assets, borrowing money and sending family members to beg or eat elsewhere.

Chronic malnutrition affects 43 percent of children under five – more than 7 million children – in DRC.

Widespread displacement – some 3.7 million people are displaced in DRC – and a steady flow of refugees from neighboring countries putting a strain on already stretched resources as well as the alarming spread of fall armyworm infestations, which affects 50 out of DRC’s 145 territories, have been exacerbating food insecurity. This particularly in areas with high levels of poverty and malnutrition and chronic food insecurity.

Much of the recent deterioration is down to the worsening plight of people in Kasaï.

“WFP is extremely concerned about food security and nutrition, which are deteriorating in many parts of DRC,” says WFP’s DRC Country Director, Claude Jibidar. “But nowhere is the situation more alarming than in Kasaï. We call on all parties to allow passage for life-saving assistance, and on the international community to help meet pressing needs.”

Support is urgently needed

FAO and WFP call for an urgent increase in the provision of lifesaving food and specialized nutrition assistance to combat malnutrition as well as seeds and tools so that farmers can plant again and regain their livelihoods.

In conflict-hit areas of Kasaï  and Tanganyika regions, FAO is providing vegetable seeds and hand tools to rapidly boost food production and increase the availability of nutritious foods among displaced and hosting communities. Ultimately, livelihoods are people’s best defense against hunger and catastrophe. In 2017, FAO is seeking to assist 2.1 million people in DRC to tackle hunger, restore food production and build more resilient livelihoods.

WFP continues to support DRC’s most vulnerable people. It has deployed staff in two of Kasaï’s hardest hit provinces, Tshikapa and Kasaï Central, where it will launch food distributions in the coming days. Elsewhere in the country, WFP is providing logistics capacity including air and road transport, fuel and storage to the wider humanitarian community.

Drought-stricken herders in Ethiopia need urgent support (11.08.2017)

Pastoralist communities are facing huge losses of livestock.

ROME, Italy, August 11, 2017 – Supporting herders to get back on their feet and preventing further livestock losses and suffering are crucial in drought-hit Ethiopia where hunger has been on the rise this year, warned today the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

Drought has devastated herders’ livelihoods as it exhausted pastures and water sources, leading to a significant number of animals dying or falling ill, particularly in the southern and southeastern regions of the country as other areas recover from previous seasons’ El Niño-induced drought.

Drought-hit pastoralists face reduced milk production, rising malnutrition, and have limited income-earning capacity and severely constrained access to food.

Some 8.5 million people – one in 12 people – are now suffering from hunger; of these, 3.3 million people live in Somali Region.

The current food and nutrition crisis is significantly aggravated by the severe blow to pastoral livelihoods. For livestock-dependent families, the animals can literally mean the difference between life and death, especially for children, pregnant and nursing women for whom milk is a crucial source of nutrition.

With up to 2 million animals lost so far, FAO is focusing on providing emergency livestock support to the most vulnerable pastoralist communities through animal vaccination and treatment, supplementary feed and water, rehabilitating water points, and supporting fodder and feed production.

“It is crucial to provide this support between now and October – when rains are due – to begin the recovery process and prevent further losses of animals. If we don’t act now, hunger and malnutrition will only get worse among pastoral communities,” said Abdoul Karim Bah, FAO Deputy Representative in Ethiopia.

By providing supplementary feed and water for livestock, while at the  same time supporting fodder production, FAO seeks to protect core breeding animals and enable drought-hit families to rebuild their livelihoods. Animal health campaigns will be reinforced to protect animals, particularly before the rains set in, when they are at their weakest and more susceptible to parasites or infectious diseases. FAO-supported destocking and cash-for-work programmes will also provide a crucial source of cash for families.

Funding appeal

FAO urgently requires US$ 20 million between August and December to come to the aid of Ethiopia’s farmers and herders.

FAO has already assisted almost 500,000 drought-hit people in 2017 through a mix of livestock feed provision, destocking and animal health interventions, thanks to the support of the Ethiopia Humanitarian Fund, Switzerland, Spain, Sweden through FAO’s Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities, the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund, as well as FAO’s own Early Warning Early Action fund and Technical Cooperation Programme.

Uganda: Major National Review Recommends Ways of Ending Hunger in Uganda (27.07.2017)

FAO issues alert over third consecutive failed rainy season, worsening hunger in East Africa (14.07.2017)

Number of people needing humanitarian assistance on the rise.

ROME, Italy, July 14, 2017 – Poor rains across East Africa have worsened hunger and left crops scorched, pastures dry and thousands of livestock dead – according to an alert released today by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).
The most affected areas, which received less than half of their normal seasonal rainfall, are central and southern Somalia, southeastern Ethiopia, northern and eastern Kenya, northern Tanzania and northeastern and southwestern Uganda.

The alert issued by FAO’s Global Information and Early Warning System (GIEWS) warns that the third consecutive failed rainy season has seriously eroded families’ resilience, and urgent and effective livelihood support is required.

“This is the third season in a row that families have had to endure failed rains – they are simply running out of ways to cope,” said FAO’s Director of Emergencies Dominique Burgeon. “Support is needed now before the situation rapidly deteriorates further.”

Increasing humanitarian need

The number of people in need of humanitarian assistance in the five aforementioned countries, currently estimated at about 16 million, has increased by about 30 percent since late 2016. In Somalia, almost half of the total population is food insecure. Timely humanitarian assistance has averted famine so far but must be sustained. Conditions across the region are expected to further deteriorate in the coming months with the onset of the dry season and an anticipated early start of the lean season.

The food security situation for pastoralists is of particular concern, in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia, where animal mortality rates are high and milk production from the surviving animals has declined sharply with negative consequences on food security and nutrition.

“When we know how critical milk is for the healthy development of children aged under five, and the irreversible damage its lack can create, it is evident that supporting pastoralists going through this drought is essential,” said Burgeon.

Livestock prices have plummeted because of poor animal body conditions and this, coupled with soaring cereal prices, has severely constrained pastoralists’ access to food.  Rangeland and livestock conditions are expected to further deteriorate at least until the next rainy season starts in October.

Poor crop prospects

In several cropping areas across the region, poor rains have caused sharp reductions in planting, and wilting of crops currently being harvested. Despite some late rainfall in May, damage to crops is irreversible.

In addition, fall armyworm, which has caused extensive damage to maize crops in southern Africa, has spread to the east and has worsened the situation. In Kenya, the pest has so far affected about 200 000 hectares of crops, and in Uganda more than half the country’s 111 districts are affected.

In Somalia there are unfavourable prospects for this year’s main gu crops, after the gu rains were late with poor rainfall and erratic distribution over most areas of the country. In the Lower Shabelle region, the main maize producing area, seasonal rainfall was about 50 percent below- average and drought conditions are currently affecting up to 85 percent of the cropland.

In Ethiopia, unfavourable belg rains in southern cropping areas are likely to result in localized cereal production shortfalls. Drought is also affecting yields in Kenya’s central, southeastern and coastal areas. In Tanzania, unfavourable rains are likely to result in localized cereal production shortfalls in northern and central areas, while in Uganda there are unfavourable production prospects are unfavourable for first season crops in the southwestern and northern districts.

Cereal prices are surging, driven by reduced supplies and concerns over the performance of current-season crops. Prices in May were at record to near-record levels in most markets and up to double their year-earlier levels.

CS Bett blames consumption of UNGA for the UNGA Crisis!

Certainly, one of these days the Jubilee government Cabinet Secretaries going to wake-up from their sleep and start to act with common sense. Since the release of subsidized maize and opening imports, the markets has not overflowed with Unga. Neither, the reality that some of the millers kept stockpiles of it, as they knew they would be subsidized from the state. So why sell it months ahead, when you can keep it steady and unleash when you get double bonus. The Jubilee government knows this and therefore right on the day of the subsidized maize and the possible export provisions came into effects. Boats with foreign maize came pouring in through the ports of Mombasa.

“He witnessed the arrival of 12,000 bags through the Rift Valley Railways yesterday. “To ensure every Kenyan enjoys the Sh90 subsidised maize flour, all maize from Mombasa will be removed using SGR, RVR and trucks,” Bett said. In two weeks, the market has been experiencing a shortage of unga. “Since we started the subsidised programme, we have witnessed more Kenyans preferring unga, thus the high demand for maize flour,” he said” (Ngotho, 2017).

CS Willy Bett, need some guidance, needs some reassurance and some sort of stiff upper-lips for insulting fellow citizens. It isn’t the sudden love for UNGA. This the staple food. This is what Kenyans are known to eat. UNGA, Ugali or Posho (Ugandan I know). Still, the maize flour meals is not a well-kept hidden secret. It would be like taking potatoes as out of the equation when feeding massive parts of Northern Europe. That is just the staple food. Period.

The CS clearly, has some internal issues and need to stop thinking he can deceive fellow citizens. As the indicated exports combined with the stockpiling was very evident. That people are buying lots of it now, is because they might even fear for more scarcity. Since it isn’t only drought, but man-made problems that has given way to shortage of UNGA.

It is time to wake-up for Mr. Bett and smell the UNGA. Time to see and relieve his fellow brothers and sisters. Not just find excuses upon excuses and think it can save his grace. You do not take away some-ones staple and think you can get away with it. Seriously, that is insulting. The insinuation and undermining of the needs and the will of Kenyans. Are evident in his approach to the UNGA crisis. This should not be forgotten, because his grace has clearly not done his job and then blames the citizens for either their staple food! Peace.

Reference:

Ngotho, Agatha – ‘Kenyans eating more ugali to blame for unga shortage – CS’ (20.06.2017) link: http://www.the-star.co.ke/news/2017/06/20/kenyans-eating-more-ugali-to-blame-for-unga-shortage-cs_c1582605?platform=hootsuite

FAO and WFP special report of 26th May 2017 explains the reasons for the famine and food insecurity in South Sudan

The Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) and the World Food Program (WFP) have gone through the basic problems of food production and general markets for it in South Sudan. Both FAO and WFP are explaining the food insecurity and reasons why. The conflict is the important factor, but there are many other reasons as well. But when people are fleeing their small-farms from rebels and the army. In South Sudan it is also the lacking rain-fall and the insecurity have been classified as famine. But to give you a sense from the report, these quotes, which explain a dire situation. This should be taken seriously, as the reports from these United Nations Organizations are the ones following the farmers on the ground and have organized supplies of specialized seeds. Take a look!

Hyperinflation:

Hyperinflation and limited import capacity due to insecurity and shortage of foreign currency have severely impacted market functioning and the availability of food commodities. Cereal prices increased up to ten times in 2016 following the sharp devaluation of the local currency and the increasing transport costs. The number of traders and the level of their food stocks have declined sharply during the second semester of 2016, with strong reduction in food availability and variety” (FAO & WFP, P: 7, 2017).

Food Insecurity:

Food insecurity has reached new records during 2016 (67 percent of the population at harvest time, with over 14 percent severely food insecure), twice the pre-conflict levels and a marked worsening from the same time last year, when food insecurity stood at 49 percent (12 percent severely food insecure). Only one-quarter (26 percent) of the households were found to have acceptable food consumption. The coming lean period of mid-2017 will likely see food insecurity levels rise further” (FAO & WFP, P: 7, 2017).

Cereal Production:

As in previous assessments, post-harvest losses and seed use for sowing in 2017 are assumed to account for 20 percent of total production, leaving a net amount of about 826 000 tonnes available for local consumption. This result is about 10 percent below the output obtained in 2015 and slightly below the last five-year average production estimates. The decline in 2016 is essentially due to displacements of farmers and disruption of farming activities following the increased insecurity and violence since July” (FAO & WFP, P: 23, 2017).

With a projected population of about 12 million in mid-2017, the overall cereal deficit in the January-December 2017 marketing year is estimated at about 500 000 tonnes, over 30 percent above the deficit estimated for 2016” (FAO & WFP, P: 7, 2017).

The Conflict of 2017:

Conflict in 2017 – The major factor influencing the general food security situation during 2017 remains the violent conflict that started in late December 2013. Not only this has not been resolved, the intensity of the conflict increased in mid-2016 (July) and is continuing into 2017. While conflict affected mostly the Greater Upper Nile Region (states of Upper Nile, Unity and Jonglei) during the initial stage of the conflict. However, this has spread out across the country and in particular spread into the major producing areas of the country, such as Western and Central Equatoria and neighbouring areas of Eastern Equatoria. Western Bahr el Ghazal has also been affected by fighting. These situations have geographically wider repercussions: disruption of farming leads to drops in national crop production, while its impacts on markets and trade routes lead to problems in the supply of staple foods to the more remote areas of the country” (FAO & WFP, P: 36, 2017).

In January 2017, 32.3 percent of the population of South Sudan (about 3.8 million people) was classified in the IPC Phases 3 (Crisis), 4 (Emergency) and 5 (Catastrophe). In the lean period of mid-2017, this proportion is likely to rise to 46.7 percent (5.5 million people). The most serious situations are in Unity State (where the population in some counties is facing famine or risk of famine) and Northern Bahr el Ghazal – over 50 percent of the population is in IPC Phases 3 to 5. The situation is expected to worsen during the lean period of 2017 (up to July)” (FAO & WFP, P: 9, 2017).

This is all worrying and the conflict edges the crisis with natural effect. From the problems with production of cereals, to hyper-inflation together with the areas where the Republic are classified as famine. All of this is combination of downward spiral no nation want to be hold-in. The Republic of South Sudan and it’s citizens are in turmoil as the farmers cannot plow their dirt and raise their seeds. All major cultivated areas got affected by the crisis and conflict, this ha by all means been reasons for the food insecurity. If people don’t see it and isn’t worried that the production area for food has been the battleground between government and rebels. So the farmers there would be in crossfire. So if these areas and states doesn’t see peace, than the production will not rise to the needed levels. That should be key importance and be needed policy by the government to make sure they are producing enough food for their population. Peace.

Reference:

FAO & WFP – ‘S P E C I A L R E P O R T – FAO/WFP CROP AND FOOD SECURITY ASSESSMENT MISSION TO SOUTH SUDAN’ (26.05.2017)

Kenya: Monetary Policy Committee Meeting (29.05.2017)

South Sudan: ‘Fighting must stop now’ so millions can be spared from famine, say UN agency chiefs (25.05.2017)

José Graziano da Silva, head of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and WFP’s David Beasley made the call during a visit to the former Unity state, one of the areas in South Sudan worst hit by the current hunger crisis.

WASHINGTON D.C., United States of America, May 25, 2017 –  Despite “appalling conditions” in South Sudan, it is not too late to save more people from dying, the head of the United Nations agriculture agency said today, joining the World Food Programme (WFP) chief in a call to all parties enmeshed in the country’s conflict to end the violence and work together to ensure access to food and other life-saving support.

José Graziano da Silva, head of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and WFP’s David Beasley made the call during a visit to the former Unity state, one of the areas in South Sudan worst hit by the current hunger crisis.

“We can still avoid a worsening of the disaster, but the fighting has to stop now,” Mr. Graziano da Silva said. “There can be no progress without peace. People must be given immediate access to food, and farmers need to be allowed to work on their fields and tend to their livestock,” he added.

Around 5.5 million people in South Sudan, or almost half the population, face severe hunger ahead of the lean season, which peaks in July. Of these, more than 90,000 face starvation with famine declared in parts of former Unity state while another one million teeter on the brink. The UN stresses that this unprecedented situation reflects the impact of ongoing strife, obstacles to delivering humanitarian assistance and declining agricultural production.

Both UN officials stressed that an immediate, massive response is critical, combining emergency food assistance and support for agriculture, livestock and fisheries.

‘The fighting must end’ so investment in children can begin, WFP’s Beasley

In the former Unity state, they visited people coping with the hunger crisis with the support of both agencies and met with people facing famine on Kok Island, a refuge in the Nile River where many people have sought shelter from fighting.

The two agency heads saw aid workers from international and local partner organizations distributing WFP food and nutrition treatments, as well as seeds and FAO fishing kits.

“Food, treatment for malnourished kids, kits that help people fish and grow vegetables – these are the difference between life and death for people we met in Unity state,” Mr. Beasley said. “But we can’t keep scaling up forever. The fighting has to end to make the kind of investments that give the children of South Sudan any hope for the future they deserve.”

‘Saving livelihoods saves lives,’ says FAO’s Graziano da Silva

The two UN agency heads visited an FAO project aiming to provide women farmers and pastoralists with a place to process milk. With rising malnutrition levels across the country, the project is an innovative way to increase the availability of safe, quality milk and milk products – a major dietary staple and a source of protein vitamins and minerals, essential components for a healthy diet.

Mr. Graziano da Silva highlighted that saving livelihoods also saves lives, saying “South Sudan has great potential – it has land, water and courageous people. If it also has peace, then together we can work to end hunger.”

Both agency heads underscored the need for further international support to confront a $182 million funding gap over the next six months.

Mr. Beasley assured that while WFP would continue to stand by the South Sudanese, its leaders “must show good faith by facilitating humanitarian efforts, including getting rid of unnecessary fees and procedures that delay and hinder aid.”

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