MinBane

I write what I like.

Archive for the tag “United Nation”

Somalia Partnership Forum – Communique (17.07.2018)

 

Advertisements

At Partnership Forum, UN officials highlights need for continued support for Somalia (17.07.2018)

UN Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs Rosemary DiCarlo praised Somalia’s leadership for the steps it has taken in developing a political roadmap for inclusive politics.

BRUSSELS, Belgium, July 17, 2018 – Speaking at the first day of the Somalia Partnership Forum in Brussels on Monday, senior United Nations officials commended the country’s government for its efforts in political reform, security, economic development, and recovery and humanitarian assistance – while flagging the need for further progress and international support for these efforts.

UN Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs Rosemary DiCarlo praised Somalia’s leadership for the steps it has taken in developing a political roadmap for inclusive politics, especially with regard to preparations leading to the ‘one person, one vote’ elections in 2020-2021, and advances in its constitutional review process.

“The Federal Government of Somalia would need to continue its efforts in building constructive relations with all those who would benefit from its leadership: the federal Parliament, Federal Member States, political groups and civil society,” said Ms. DiCarlo.

“This will ultimately help to stabilize the political environment, achieve further progress and strengthen Somalia’s resilience against pressures that risk undermining its unity,” she added.

The Horn of Africa country is facing a range of political, developmental, security and humanitarian challenges as it rebuilds after decades of armed conflict and climate-related shocks.

Taking place in the Belgian capital, the two-day Forum also spotlighted the importance of supporting a nationally-owned and led reconciliation processes.

Ms. DiCarlo noted that further progress is needed to strengthen the constitutional, legal and institutional foundations of the Somali Federal State, including allocation of powers and resource sharing.

“Despite the challenges that may arise, it is critical that these processes are conducted in an inclusive, consensual manner to ensure ownership by the Somali people,” she said, adding that the UN is committed to advancing inclusive politics in Somalia.

“We are providing technical, financial and logistical support, and we strongly support nationally-owned and -led reconciliation processes, including the national reconciliation framework,” Ms. DiCarlo concluded.

In his remarks, UN Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Somalia Michael Keating encouraged the international community to “keep Somalia on the agenda,” and noted that the inclusive approach in Somali politics needs to be extended to building national security in an effort to build trust.

“I cannot commend the Government enough for its commitment to a genuinely holistic approach, to recognizing that it is not only about military and operations, it’s also about building institutions, rule of law, accountable local governance, reconciliation and countering violent extremism,” he said.

Ethiopia: Continued unrest in Amhara and in Moyale!

There are certain problems that doesn’t get solved with opening of an Eritrean Embassy in Addis Ababa. It is a good move to have dialogue and diplomatic ties with Eritrea for Ethiopia. What the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Defence Force (EPRDF) and the Prime Minister Dr. Abiy Ahmed Ali has done over the last two weeks have been special.

Since all his takeover, there are still spill-over of troubles ahead, where the government and army doesn’t have total control. Even as the Oromo are creating a bloodshed in Moyale in the Ogaden Region. This has been happening through the June and July month this year. As well, as there been skirmishes by the Sudanese Army in Metema part of Amhara Region. Where they killed about 16 farmers before the 5th July and more in clashes on the 15th July. Therefore, the sovereign state of Ethiopia needs help. They are been taken for a ride by the Sudanese Republic, also by internal forces killing in the Moyale area.

The amount of dead in Moyale during July is hard to verify, but the Oromo feels a new spirit after the new PM came to power and gave way to Oromo Liberation Front (OLF), Queerro and other parties, that was before seen as terrorist organizations. Now they feel liberated, but their actions are possible as bad as the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF), as they are killing the Somali people in the Ogaden Region and that is the same as the Aghazi was doing to the Oromo for years. Certainly, their activity should be condemn. That after days of reports of massacres in Moyale, the PM reacted, but really slow, as the deaths have been piling up.

Both of these skirmishes needs to be addressed, the parties need to answer for their deaths, as much as the numbers are sketchy at best, but by 13th July in Moyale, the Oromo had killed about 80 people. That is huge amount of people. Who knows how many that has lost their lives in both regions of Ethiopia this month.

It is sad as the progress under the PM is hopeful, but what is happening in Amhara and Ogaden is worrying, as the State of Emergency is still in effect and the actions of government is lackluster at best. When concerning the lives of the Somali ones living within the border regions of Ethiopia, as well, as the lack of condemnation and even stoppage of Sudanese troops entering Amhara and killing farmers in the Metema.

All of that needs actions, as the government need to take charge and show capability to take care of its citizens. That is if, they even care of this is a play from Tigray to show that Oromo is as violent as them. Also, that the Sudanese can toy-around because they want to challenge and weaken the Amhara spirit, because of their pro-longed protest against the EPRDF and the TPLF.

Who knows, but these vicious atrocities happens. As long as the continuing silence and lack of effort. We can wonder if these people are living in the wrong zip-code and in the wrong time. As they are not even valued by their own authorities, who are supposed to be there and defending them. The EPRDF should know this is their time. To act and make a difference.

The PM have proven it is possible, at this instance, he should too. If he cares about all these people losing their lives. It is on his watch. It will be on his hands if he doesn’t stop it. Not only remembered for the peace agreement with Eritrea, but the killed people of Amhara and Moyale. Peace.

Opinion: Museveni will not respect the South Sudanese Arms Embargo!

It is a noble idea to have an Arms Embargo in South Sudan, as the civil war and the never-ending negotiations of peace is continuing, even as the Khartoum Declaration and Outstanding Issues are working in tandem, even as the IGAD High Level Revitalization Forum have sort of failed and only given the republic empty promises. As the partners haven’t agreed totally or even respected the cease-fire starting on the 1st July 2018. There still been skirmishes and attacks, which wasn’t supposed to appear.

With this in mind the negotiation and peace dialogue in Entebbe haven’t been fruitful or delivered. In this spirit it isn’t weird, as he has been a starch supporter of President Salva Kiir Mayardit and the Transitional Government of National Unity (TGoNU). That has been proven in the past, latest in February, when he promised to serve weapons to Kiir, even if there was imposed an embargo. Therefore, his words yesterday are important. Also show the provisions of the Arms Embargo in the end.

In February 2018:

I want to you tell this, and whether you believe it or not, the government will never fail to acquire weapons by any means. What the foreign countries, including the United States of America, are doing is a pursuit of regime change which nobody will entertain even in America,” said a presidential aide asked what actually was the message Ugandan envoy had delivered. “Nobody will accept that a democratically elected government be changed through the force or by an imposed agreement,” he further told Sudan Tribune on condition of anonymity” (…) “President Museveni is indeed a friend of the people of South Sudan. He sent the special message for two purposes. One, he assured his excellency, General Salva Kiir Mayardit of the support of the people and the government of the Republic of Uganda to the people and the Republic of South Sudan. His Excellency President Museveni gave the assurance of highest support in this situation. Two, in case of sanctions, the government of Uganda would do its best to ensure all weapons and associated services destined to South Sudan are facilitated,” he said” (Sudan Tribune, 2018).

In July 2018:

Museveni told the United Kingdom minister for armed forces Col. Mark Lancaster that an arms embargo will not help in the peace process. “Mr Museveni told his guests that imposing sanctions on South Sudan will not help in finding a solution to that country’s challenges adding that observation of ceasefire by the warring groups, security reform and working to have elections, among others, will help the country move towards peace,” Museveni told Col. Lancaster, according to a statement released by Uganda State House.

United Nations Arms Embargo:

Arms Embargo “4. Decides that, until 31 May 2019, all Member States shall immediately take the necessary measures to prevent the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer to the territory of South Sudan from or through their territories or by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, of arms and related materiel of all types, including weapons and ammunition, military vehicles and equipment, paramilitary equipment, and spare parts for the aforementioned; and technical assistance, training, financial or other assistance, related to military activities or the provision, maintenance or use of any arms and related materiel, including the provision of armed mercenary personnel whether or not originating in their territories;” (…) “8. Calls upon all Member States, in particular States neighbouring South Sudan, to inspect, in accordance with their national authorities and legislation and consistent with international law, in particular the law of the sea and relevant international civil aviation agreements, all cargo to South Sudan, in their territory, including seaports and airports, if the State concerned has information that provides reasonable grounds to believe the cargo contains items the supply, sale, or transfer of which is prohibited by paragraph 4 of this resolution for the purpose of ensuring strict implementation of these provisions” (…) “9. Decides to authorize all Member States to, and that all Member States shall, upon discovery of items the supply, sale, or transfer of which is prohibited by paragraph 4 of this resolution, seize and dispose (such as through destruction, rendering inoperable, storage or transferring to a State other than the originating or destination States for disposal) of such items, and decides further that all Member States shall cooperate in such efforts” (UNSC, 2018).

As you have seen, President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni has promised arms, even if there is an embargo and he will secure weapons for the conflict. That is how he is, he doesn’t care about the conflict or the innocent lives taken by it. He is the war-lord earning fortunes on the trade of arms and being a beacon in the midst of the conflict. It is a win-win, he get to sell weapons and be part of the peace-process. Which I find amazing.

That the African Union and East African Community is using Museveni is boggling me, when he has no trouble offering weapons and arms to the TGoNU and Kiir government. So, when he is such a partner to the Juba Administration, while it is negotiations and having dialogue with the rebels and other outfits. It doesn’t make sense.

He will not follow the Arms Embargo, as he has promised to help Kiir. Therefore, the UN shouldn’t just call upon, they should also sanction them for trading arms with South Sudan. That is why the Embargo has little value, as long as the Ugandan government are friendly and will do business with the TGoNU. They will serve the needs and sell to earn big-business in Juba on the arms-trade.

Museveni doesn’t fear the UN or the Member States, they are in his favor with refugees and peacekeepers elsewhere. So, if he breaks Arms Embargo and sanctions, he know he won’t get scrutinized or even pay for violations. That is why he will do it too. Peace.

Reference:

South Sudan News Agency – ‘Ugandan President asks UN to drop South Sudan arms embargo’ 14.07.2018 link: http://southsudannewsagency.org/index.php/2018/07/14/ugandan-president-asks-un-to-drop-south-sudan-arms-embargo/

Sudan Tribune – ‘Museveni tells South Sudan not to worry from U.S. sanctions’ (11.02.2018) link: http://www.sudantribune.com/spip.php?article64703

United Nations Security Council (UNSC) – ‘Adopting Resolution 2428 (2018), Security Council Extends Sanctions on South Sudan’ 13.07.2018 link: https://reliefweb.int/report/south-sudan/adopting-resolution-2428-2018-security-council-extends-sanctions-south-sudan

Ethiopia: Human Peace Voice – Moyale Somali Ethnic Civilians Mascara (13.07.2018)

RDC: Communique de Presse (09.07.2018)

RDC: CLC – Le Peuple Congolais Revendique Haut et Fort son Droit a des Elections Credibles (07.07.2018)

 

Jubaland State of Somalia Monthly Security Council Meeting, Kismayo 2nd July 2018: “Re: Submission of Serious Concerns” (02.07.2018)

Human Rights council discusses situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (05.07.2018)

The committee appealed to government, faith-based organisations, traditional leaders and community organisations to join hands against this scourge that is plaguing our society.

PRETORIA, South Africa, July 5, 2018 – The committee was made aware of the weaknesses and strengths within Sapo and the South African Social Security Agency (Sassa) before this process was implemented. Because weaknesses in the implementation of the payment process are now becoming manifest, the committee wants to revisit the roadmap that Sapo presented to the committee and to hear about the progress Sapo has made in its checklist for disbursements.

Such weaknesses include, among other things, long queues, stampedes in post offices, the inability of staff to cope with large numbers of people and the unavailability of enough cash in most areas. This is why the committee wants to understand how far both entities are in working together to ensure that grants are disseminated successfully in future.

The committee has also urged Sassa to improve the way it communicates with South Africans and to do so timeously, particularly when challenges are anticipated. The committee urges Sassa to ensure that frontline staff dealing directly with the public are kind and courteous.

The committee also believes that Sassa should consider alternative ways of using a pin number to access the social grants. It has transpired through provincial reports that a lot of grant beneficiaries, particularly the elderly, easily forget their pin numbers and there was no support system, as had been promised before implementation.

The scourge of sexual assault on children was also before the committee at today’s meeting. Some of the Chapter 9 institutions attending the meeting suggested that poor coordination is failing these vulnerable groups. The committee resolved to ask the Minister of Social Development to take up the matter with the Speaker of the National Assembly and the Leader of Government Business. This serious social challenge requires a response from government, particularly from within the Department of Social Development, which should champion this response.

The committee also sent sincere condolences to all families whose loved ones passed away as a result of a sexual assault. The committee appealed to government, faith-based organisations, traditional leaders and community organisations to join hands against this scourge that is plaguing our society.

Statement by UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein: “Enhanced interactive dialogue on the Democratic Republic of the Congo” (03.07.2018)

3 July 2018

Distinguished President
Members of the International Team of experts,
Excellencies,

This interactive dialogue on the Democratic Republic of the Congo is both timely and important. The human rights situation remains of great concern across the country. The United Nations Joint Human Rights Office has documented an increased number of violations: 2,858 from January to May this year, as compared to 2,332 during the same period in 2017 – and the real scale of violations is certainly even greater.

The security situation continues to deteriorate in several regions across the country, with dramatic impact on civilians.

I remain particularly concerned about the violence in South and North Kivu, and in the Kasai regions, with increasing activity by Nyatura and other Mayi-Mayi armed groups in North Kivu, as well as a Mayi-Mayi coalition led by William Yakutumba that is particularly active in South Kivu and, more recently, in the province of Maniema.

Interethnic and intercommunity violence has also continued in Ituri province between members of the Hema and Lendu communities, resulting in deaths, the burning of villages, and mass displacement. Recently deployed army troops are also alleged to have committed human rights violations, particularly targeting the Lendu community.

The situation in the Kasai regions is also deeply preoccupying, with severe abuses against civilians by armed groups, and multiple human rights violations committed by Congolese defence and security forces in their response to the activities of these militias. You will be appraised of the findings of the team of international experts dispatched by my Office in line with the Council’s Resolution 35/33. In this context, I would like to note that further to Resolution 35/33, my Office has also assisted the military authorities’ investigation in the Kasai regions, with two missions by forensic, judicial and witness protection experts.

Mr President,

These and other conflicts continue to drive very large numbers of people away from their homes and livelihoods – further deepening their vulnerability to violations, particularly in the case of women and children. According to OCHA, there are now 4.4 million internally displaced people in the DRC.

I strongly urge the authorities to abide by their obligations under international human rights and humanitarian law in all the conflict zones, namely Bas-Uélé, Haut-Uélé, South and North Kivu, Maniema, Tanganyika and the Kasai regions.  I further urge much stronger efforts to hold the perpetrators of violations responsible. The perpetrators of conflict-related sexual violence must also be held to account – even, and perhaps especially, when they are agents of the State.

Members of the Congolese armed forces, or FARDC, appear to have been responsible for fully one third of the violations and abuses, including sexual violence, which the UN Joint Human Rights Office has documented across all the conflict zones since the beginning of the year. These crimes do not only harm their victims: they damage the credibility of the authorities responsible for protection, inciting people to create or join irregular self-defence groups. I urge the Government to undertake the necessary measures to ensure the prosecution of perpetrators of these human rights violations. Effective justice will be a deterrent to prevent future violations by members of the military.

I note that in recent months there has been some limited progress in establishing accountability for past violations. In April, a Lieutenant Colonel was sentenced by the South Kivu military tribunal to a 20-year prison term for crimes against humanity and war crimes, including sexual slavery, as well as pillage and attacks on civilians, committed between 2005 and 2007.

Mr President,

I am also deeply troubled by numerous violations of human rights norms and principles in relation to people’s rights to participate in the democratic space. This persistent trend raises serious doubts about the credibility of the DRC’s long-delayed elections, which are now due to take place on 23 December 2018.

Regrettably, there has been no progress in implementing the confidence-building measures laid out in the 31 December 2016 political agreement, including respect for the rights to freedom of opinion, expression and peaceful assembly, the release of all political prisoners, and accountability for human rights violations. The alleged perpetrators of violations, including those who have used disproportionate force to suppress demonstrations, continue to benefit from widespread impunity, undermining public trust in commitments made by the Government.

As requested, my Office has provided technical advice to the national commission of inquiry set up by the Government in response to the brutal attacks which took place during protests in December 2017 and January 2018. The report of the commission, which was released in March, concluded that members of the police and army committed human rights violations, including excessive use of force. It formulated a number of very pertinent recommendations, notably lifting the ban on public demonstrations, and restrictions on use of the military during demonstrations. I regret that to date most of these recommendations have not been implemented and that the consolidated report was transferred to the Ministry of Justice only last week.

Despite verbal commitments by the Minister of Human Rights to lift the ban on public demonstrations, the authorities continued to prohibit or repress activities organized by civil society and opposition parties. In March, April and May, my Office documented 61 violations of the right to freedom of assembly. For example, on 19 May, in Kindu, Maniema province, the launch of the opposition platform Ensemble pour le changement was banned by local authorities, although the President’s political party organised two public demonstrations in Kindu that same month without impediment.

Intimidation of human rights activists and journalists has intensified, with many suffering regular threats to their lives and families. Multiple cases of arbitrary arrests and detention by the security forces continue to be documented by UNJHRO. Lengthy incommunicado detentions by intelligence services, without judicial review, are another matter of great concern and should be prohibited.

Moreover, legislation currently in preparation appears to be intended to further restrict public freedoms and the role of civil society in the DRC. These bills include a draft law on terrorism; a draft law on the protection and responsibilities of human rights defenders, which is currently before Parliament; and a draft law regulating the work of non-profit organizations. I strongly encourage Members of Parliament to refrain from adopting laws which fail to comply with the people’s human rights.

Mr President,

Landmark elections are approaching in a context characterised by continued restrictions of rights and freedoms, and a shrinking democratic space. The Government should be encouraged to prevent further erosion of the rights of the Congolese people at this crucial time, and to fully implement its commitments under the 31 December 2016 agreement, including the release of all political prisoners.

Measures to uphold human rights will also address many root causes of the conflicts now raging in the DRC, which have led to one of the continent’s largest caseloads of displaced people. Both national security and international security can only be obtained when individual security and rights are respected.

The work of the Office, through technical cooperation and monitoring, brings vital assistance to the authorities, including in the electoral process. We stand ready to provide further necessary support to the government to uphold the fundamental rights and freedoms of the people.

Thank you Mr President.

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: