Getafix of Madagascar Part II: A look into Rajolina’s magical tea!

There is now two weeks or so, maybe even three since the headlines and the breaking news of a miracle cure from Madagascar. Proudly presented by the President of Republic. However, as time has moved on and the Republic is now selling it abroad too. It is time to look into it.

I don’t think any product, any sort of edible or drinkable product should be sold without being verified. Especially, when they say that it has the ability to beat COVID-19 or the Coronavirus. That is why I am looking into it. I wish and hope we can find a cure, but to state that without any significant study or research is a bit hesitant and make you wonder, if the President of Madagascar is a snake-oil salesmen. If the former DJ and Mayor, Adry Rajolina is out of water.

The COVID – Organics, the CVO – Tambvy has two main components. These are Artemesia Annua and Stevia. In a 1l bottle it has 5 gram of Artemesia and 2,5 grams of Stevia rebaudiana. There been several of studies of Artemesia Annua toward Bilharzia and Malaria. Therefore, it has medicinal effects, but as tea there been some mixed messages or conclusions.

In 2006: “As the above statements make clear, further research is needed on Artemisia annua teas, to try to improve on the results obtained thus far. Important questions to address include: can the efficacy of A. annua tea be increased so that it becomes an acceptable complement to ACTs? How can we ensure that patients receive an adequate dose? Can A. annua tea be safely used without accelerating the appearance of resistant strains of Plasmodium? It is not possible to answer these questions with a single experiment on a single preparation of A. annua tea” (African Traditional Herbal Medicine Supporters Initiative, 2007).

Annua study in 2011 in Uganda concludes like this: “A. annua has great potential for use in mass prevention of malaria in resource limited settings such as Uganda. The malaria and fever prophylactic effects are possibly due to A. annua flavonoids other than artemisinin A.annua variety or product thereof rich in flavonoids but devoid of artemisinin should be developed and tried for mass prevention of malaria as a beverage or food supplement taken regularly” Ogwang et. al., 2011).

Another study from 2014: “Artemisinin, extracted from the plant Artemisia annua (A. annua) L., and artemisinin derivatives are the current best antimalarial therapeutics and are delivered as artemisinin combination therapy (ACT). Availability and cost are problematic for the developing world where malaria is endemic. Oral consumption of A. annua dried leaves is more effective than the pure drug. A tea infusion of the leaves has prophylactic effects. Cost of producing and delivering the tea and A. annua dried leaf tablets is much more affordable than ACT” (Weathers et. Al, 2014).

So, this proves the annua has effects as a tea, but that’s for malaria. However, all studies I have seen says it has to be certain factors and amounts to secure it. Therefore, it is not easy to see how this will fit another disease. Another study from 2018 that annua and another kind of Artemesia can have effect also against bilharzia. This proves, the medical usage of annua towards other diseases. However, this haven’t been done in consideration with COVID-19 or the Coronavirus. Just like hydroxychloroquine, which was said to work against it too. Now, that has been dismissed in scientific studies. This is why, the ones proclaiming the effects before saying Artemisia Annua tea is a remedy.

While Stevia has this effect: “They found the consumption of Stevia extract reduces the levels of cholesterol, triglyceride and low-density lipoproteincholesterol significantly while an increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was noted, which is desirable. They concluded that Stevia extract had a hypolipidaemic effect used to reduce the resistance of cardiovascular disease” (S.K. Goyal, 2010).

We can see there is many significant attributes to the Stevia plant. However, there is nothing in that specifically points towards the COVID-19. That is why it’s hard to say anything.

This is why its bugging for me, that the President of Madagascar has such bold claims. Yes, both plants has medical benefits. However, none is scientifically proven in combat towards COVID-19. So, selling it for it is claiming effects on something not proven. For all we know. This could have the placebo affect. Gods know why the President wants to do that trade.

By all means, I don’t care who and where the medicine for COVID-19 comes from. Neither what plant, plants or if it is sea-weed or algae. As long as it heals this disease. If Madagascar has found it. It’s awesome and congrats. However, at this very moment there is no scientific proof. That is why selling it as a cure and such is very brazen. Especially, when there is no study proving it. We need a medicine and remedy to COVID-19. That needs to be proven and studied.

Yes, the two things in the CVO – Tambvy has some favourable attributes. However, that is studied for other diseases. Not this one. Just like hydroxychloroquine, this could a be total blast in the wind. Yes, there is no deaths of COVID in Madagascar and a huge result in recovered cases. But, this is not saying anything yet. It can be coincidence and luck. We cannot state it at this mere point. Neither can the President of Madagascar. However, he got a bridge to sell. Peace.

Reference:

African Traditional Herbal Medicine Supporters Initiative – ‘Artemisia Annua as a Herbal Tea for Malaria’ – Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. 2007; 4(1): 121–123. (Published online 2006).

Ogwang et. al – Use of Artemisia annua L. Infusion for Malaria Prevention: Mode of Action and Benefits in a Ugandan Community’ – Patrick E. Ogwang, Jasper O. Ogwal, Simon Kasasa, Francis Ejobi, David Kabasa and Celestino Obua, 07.05.2011 – British Journal of Pharmaceutical Research

S.K. Goyal – ‘Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) a bio-sweetener: a review’ – International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, February 2010; 61(1): 1–10

Pamela J Weathers, Melissa Towler, Ahmed Hassanali, Pierre Lutgen, and Patrick Ogwang Engeu – ‘Dried-leaf Artemisia annua: A practical malaria therapeutic for developing countries?’ – World J Pharmacol. 2014 Dec 9; 3(4): 39–55. Published online 2014 Dec 9 (2014).

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