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Archive for the tag “Nuba-Mountains”

Joint United Nations Hybrid Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) – Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) team deployed to assist families affected by mudslides in East Jebel Marra (20.09.2018)

Today, a joint team comprising United Nations Hybrid Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) civilian staff and the Humanitarian Country Team, as well as 70 peacekeepers, including 30 Special Forces and six doctors, reached the affected area.

EL FASHER, Sudan, September 20, 2018 – The African Union – United Nations Hybrid Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) and the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT), have deployed a joint mission to provide emergency assistance to people affected by mudslides in East Jebel Marra, South Darfur.

Heavy rains in the area last week caused mudslides in Wadi Tuliba and Tagulei villages, resulting in the reported deaths of at least 19 people and the injury of 25 others, while an unspecified number remain unaccounted for and some families have lost their homes, according to official local sources.

Today, a joint team comprising UNAMID civilian staff and the Humanitarian Country Team, as well as 70 peacekeepers, including 30 Special Forces and six doctors, reached the affected area.

The team will conduct an assessment of the humanitarian situation and provide medical assistance, as well as non-food items such as tents and plastic sheets for shelter, kitchen sets, blankets and mosquito nets to the affected community.

UNAMID Joint Special Representative (JSR), Jeremiah Mamabolo and the UN Resident Coordinator and Humanitarian Coordinator, Gwi-Yeop Son expressed their deepest condolences to the families who lost loved ones during the disaster and pledged to assist the survivors within their organizations’ limited resources.

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UNMISS condemns attack on peacekeeping convoy in South Sudan (15.09.2018)

SSUF: Statement on the recently signed South Sudan Peace Accord (14.09.2018)

SSOA: The Revitalized Peace Agreement is Unsustainable for South Sudan (13.09.2018)

The Chairperson of the Commission welcomes the signing of the Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan (13.09.2018)

Troika Statement on the South Sudan Peace Talks (12.09.2018)

IGAD Special Envoy letter Ethiopian MoFA: “Re: Unresolved Issues of Revitalized ARCISS” (31.08.2018)

South Sudan: Without peace deal, scorched-earth tactics and civilian suffering will continue (10.09.2018)

It is important that any political solution takes into account the needs of everyday South Sudanese people, especially marginalized groups like women.

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 10, 2018 – The signing of a peace agreement between South Sudan’s warring parties is a hopeful sign that a sustainable solution can be found for a conflict that has had tragic consequences for millions of civilians.

It is important that any political solution takes into account the needs of everyday South Sudanese people, especially marginalized groups like women, said Dominik Stillhart, the global director of operations for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

“The human cost of continued conflict in South Sudan has led to humanitarian catastrophe inside the country. That’s not hyperbole. That’s fact,” said Stillhart, who visited South Sudan last week to speak with residents and view ICRC’s operations.

Civilians should not bear the brunt of conflict, but in South Sudan they often do. So far this year, the ICRC has admitted 69 children and 47 women into our hospitals with injuries from weapons. Untold thousands of children are being deprived of school and many are separated from their families.

The conflict has been particularly brutal on women. They are left to fight for the survival of their families, fleeing with their children and foraging for food. Thousands have endured rape or sexual assault. The ICRC calls on those at the negotiating table to make sure any agreement takes into account their needs, as well as those of other marginalized groups.

“Without a ceasefire, the past five years tell us that scorched-earth tactics will likely continue, as we have seen continuous and systemic disregard for international humanitarian law and the civilians that the law protects,” Stillhart said. “Aid organizations can provide relief but cannot end the violence and displacement the South Sudanese people have endured for five years — only a political solution can.”

Facts and Figures:

• From January – June 2018 the ICRC distributed 29,700 monthly household food rations to more than 223,000 people, gave 158,000 people seeds and tools for farming and 103,000 people fishing kits.

• ICRC performed 1,735 surgical interventions, evacuated 316 people with conflict-related injuries, provided consultations for more than 75,000 patients, and improved access to safe drinking water to some 273,000 people, and visited nearly 3,600 detainees.

• Together with the South Sudan Red Cross this year we have facilitated more than 29,000 phone calls between family members and their loved ones. We have also physically reunited 33 people, including children, with their families.

• We spread knowledge and respect for International Humanitarian Law. More than 1,500 military personnel and nearly 1,500 police personnel have been trained this year.

• The ICRC has been permanently active in South Sudan for 38 years.

 

SLM/A urges UK Parliamentary delegation to Sudan to raise issues of peace, accountability and (POWs) with the regime in Khartoum (09.09.2018)

Opinion: Al-Bashir’s government is broke, that’s why he is so invested in South Sudanese Peace Process!

Today’s news from Khartoum all makes sense, as the bread-riots and rising prices are now hitting the government, as the President of Sudan, Omar al-Bashir had to dissolve and cut-back on government spending, this is happening as the Khartoum government have been more involved in the Peace Process of Juba and South Sudan, than usual. Surely, there are with some reasons. I will get to those, but as there are some clear indications why, now as the Sudanese government clearly lack fiscal funds and needs to revise their budgets. As the Cabinet is shrinking in.

Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir has decided to dissolve the country’s national reconciliation government, Al Arabiya News Channel can confirm. Instead, Bashir has reduced the number of ministries under a newly formed government to 21 portfolios. Among the changes included the appointment of Moataz Mousa as successor to Mohammed Osman Rikabi as finance minister and Sadiq Ahmed al-Nile as successor to Ibrahim Mahmoud as interior minister” (Al Arabiya English – ‘Sudan’s Bashir dissolves govt, appoints new ministers’ 09.09.2018).

Because, there was vital part of the Khartoum Declaration of 25th June 2018, that bugged me like crazy and now that Khartoum is clearly going into a deep economic struggle. Those parts of the agreement makes more sense and why Al-Bashir made himself such a sponsor of the agreement between the SPLM/A-IG, SPLM/A-IO, SPLM-FPD and the SSOA,

What was striking to me, was this article from June 2018:

To delegate the government of Sudan to take the necessary steps towards securing oil fields in South Sudan in coordination with the Government of South Sudan, and to work on the rehabilitation of the oil fields with the view to restore previous levels of the oil production. In this context, the outstanding issues between the two sisterly countries of Sudan and South Sudan related to oil sector shall be resolved” (Points of Framework Agreement, 25.06.2018).

Today, it makes even more sense, as the rise and production of oil, that will go through the pipelines will add revenue to the state on the brink of economic tragedy. Because, Khartoum cannot be in a good place economically, when they are scaling down the size of the government and ceasing ministries. That shows that the Sudanese are lacking fiscal funds and are in dire need of new revenue sources. However, that can come from South Sudan, if they get their act together, have peace and have less internal fighting. Than the pipelines can provide Khartoum steady rates of the flowing oil to Port Sudan and ensure petro-dollars. That would save the day and the face of Al-Bashir.

That is why he has taken a further stake, as he needs the oil revenue now, as his state are lacking funds. Because no sensible state overnight, makes order to scale-back without some lack of fiscal funds to run the operations of these ministries and pay for the civil servants there.

We can just await riots and trouble, unless Al-Bashir gets sudden funding. This is the writing on the wall and the reasons for sudden involvement in the peace process are now more evident too. As he needs all the barrels of oil he can, because that can save his fiscal revenue and ensure all his allies are paid. Peace.

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