MinBane

I write what I like.

Archive for the tag “National Health Sector Development Plan”

New Study Finds Worrying Climate Trend in Karamoja Over Last 35 Years (20.03.2017)

Released in Kampala today, the ‘Impacts of Climate Change on Food Security and Livelihoods in Karamoja’ found that temperatures have been rising in Karamoja over the last 35 years.

KAMPALA, Uganda, March 20, 2017 – A new study carried out by the Government of Uganda and its partners has found a new weather pattern that threatens to worsen food insecurity in the Karamoja region if no action is taken.

The study found that the average monthly rainfall in the region increased over the last 35 years and that the rainy season is now longer by two months. However, the rains – which now fall from around March to the end of the year – increasingly varied in volumes. This unpredictability was found to undermine agricultural production, thereby threatening to aggravate food insecurity in Karamoja.

Released in Kampala today, the ‘Impacts of Climate Change on Food Security and Livelihoods in Karamoja’ found that temperatures have been rising in Karamoja over the last 35 years.

The rising temperatures threaten to increase the frequency, intensity and duration of heat waves in the region, therefore reducing availability of water for crops and animals. This too undermines food security.

A large majority of people in Karamoja, particularly women, were not aware that changes to the climate had been taking place over decades, the study states. However, most of the people that had perceived changes to the climate had not taken any action to adapt, typically because they did not know how to do so. Where trees were planted as an adaptation measure, the sale of charcoal and firewood were also a common measure that people took in response to climate-related crop failure.

Sponsored by the Swedish Government, the study was carried out in 2016 by the Ministry of Water and Environment with support from the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the CGIAR Consortium’s Research Programme on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security.

The Uganda Minister for Water and Environment, Sam Cheptoris, said today, “These are significant findings that threaten any hope for Uganda achieving its Vision 2040 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), if no immediate action is taken.”

Cheptoris said that his Ministry was already calling for a national and regional response, advocating for climate change sensitive approaches across all Government sectors, educating the population about climate change, and undertaking emissions profiles.

“Karamoja’s population is heavily dependent on rain-fed agriculture, which is highly vulnerable to climate change,” said El Khidir Daloum, WFP Country Director for Uganda. “However, little has been known previously about the impacts of climate change on food security, and in particular, the ability of households in the region to adapt.”

WFP hopes that the findings and recommendations of the study will contribute to efforts toward appropriate adaptation measures while helping to identify policies that will safeguard the most vulnerable communities in Karamoja.

The study recommended that the Government and its partners increase investments in water harvesting and agroforestry schemes, education of the people, improved access to climate change information and the cultivation of drought-resistant crop varieties.

Within the Ministry of Water and Environment, the study was carried out by the Climate Change Department and the Uganda National Meteorological Authority.

Advertisements

Press Release: KOICA and UNICEF provide ambulances to save lives in Karamoja (09.03.2016)

IMG-20151202-WA0014

NEW YORK, United States of America, March 9, 2016The Korean International Cooperation Agency and UNICEF in Uganda have today handed over three ambulances to the districts of Amudat, Kotido and Napak to enable pregnant women access life-saving services or health facilities quickly.

The support is part of the four-year UNICEF-KOICA partnership launched last year and focuses on strengthening the continuum of care for maternal, new-born and child health services, by addressing the three delays that are responsible for maternal and new-born deaths. The continuum of care includes integrated service delivery for mothers and children from pregnancy to child birth, immediately after childbirth and through childhood.

The handover ceremony took place at the UNICEF Moroto Zonal Offices in Moroto. UNICEF’s Representative to Uganda Ms. Aida Girma handed over the ambulances to the district leadership of Amudat, Kotido and Napak.

Maternal and new-born mortality remain a global challenge and more so, an area of concern for Uganda. Women and new-borns continue to die from preventable causes. In, Uganda, there has been a slow progress in averting maternal and new-born mortality specifically in hard-to-reach areas and among vulnerable populations living in Karamoja.

The Karamoja region still registers poor indicators. While the national maternal mortality ratio is 438 per 100,000 live births, that of Karamoja is estimated at 750 per 100,000 live births.

Uganda has a well elaborated health policy and strategies for the reduction of maternal and child mortality, such as the Reproductive Maternal New-born Child and Adolescent Health (RMNCAH) strategy which is aligned to the National Health Sector Development Plan and the Global strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescent Health. This strategy also defines high impact interventions for the reduction of maternal and new-born mortality.

However, at district level, there is need to strengthen integration of services across the continuum of care; accountability and monitoring frameworks and to effectively support coordination of high-impact and cost-effective interventions that are defined in the RMNCAH strategy.

“The ambulances provided today are timely and will address the second delay which occurs at the community level before reaching the health facility,” said Mrs. Aida Girma, UNICEF’s Representative to Uganda.

“The delays bar pregnant women from accessing life-saving services in time,” she added.

The four-year partnership, costed at USD 8,552,020 (approximately 28 billion Uganda shillings) will target more than 100,000 pregnant women, over 15,000 pregnant women presenting with labour complications, and 100,000 children under five, including new-borns.

The project is being implemented in seven districts of the Karamoja region – Abim, Amudat, Kaabong, Kotido, Moroto, Napak and Nakapiripirit. 

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: