Machar warned onslaught against Kiir will be crushed (Youtube-Clip)

“Newly appointed South Sudan Vice President Taban Deng Gai on Wednesday warned his predecessor Dr Riek Machar that he will be stopped at all costs if he attempts to go on the offensive. Gai who was in Kenya to brief President Uhuru Kenyatta on the progress of implementing the peace agreement warned that President Salva Kiir’s government would not allow Machar to interfere with peace and security of South Sudan” (Capital FM Kenya, 2016)

37,200 South Sudanese Sheltering in UN House Protection Site in Juba (17.08.2016)

UN House Juba

Facing insecurity and hunger, more than 190,000 people continue to seek protection at PoC sites across the country, in Juba, Bentiu, Malakal, Wau, Bor and Melut. 

JUBA, South Sudan, August 17, 2016 – An estimated 37,200 displaced persons are currently seeking protection at one of the two UN peacekeeping bases in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, according to a population count held at the UN House protection of civilians (PoC) site on 13 August.

Renewed violence and instability have generated new displacement in South Sudan in recent months. Facing insecurity and hunger, more than 190,000 people continue to seek protection at PoC sites across the country, in Juba, Bentiu, Malakal, Wau, Bor and Melut.

The majority of the 37,200 internally displaced persons (IDPs) living at the UN House PoC site fled the violence that erupted in Juba on 15 December 2013 and quickly spread throughout the country. Thousands more fled to the base when fighting resumed in the capital between government and opposition forces in July 2016.

To determine the current size of the IDP population in the site, IOM joined ACTED, camp manager of the UN House PoC site, and other UN and non-governmental organizations to conduct the population count. The exercise began before dawn to ensure accuracy, with a house-to-house operation.

The population count is important for the delivery of services, particularly food assistance. The exercise will improve planning for humanitarian assistance and enable the UN World Food Programme to provide food for the full population registered at the site.

“Interagency cooperation was essential to the success of the exercise. Staff from 15 agencies participated in the population count, from planning to logistics to implementation,” said Andrea Paiato, IOM Camp Coordination and Camp Management Programme Coordinator.

UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) peacekeeping troops and UN Police provided security, while camp management and partners conducted a messaging campaign before registration.

The fighting in Juba in July displaced at least 15,000 people, of which more than 12,500 remain displaced at the UN House PoC site, UNMISS peacekeeping base in Tong Ping and collective centres.

IOM is coordinating with relief agencies to provide emergency assistance to IDPs at the Tong Ping site, managing an emergency health care clinic, providing shelter and ensuring access to safe drinking water. ACTED continues to facilitate humanitarian operations at the UN House PoC site.

Government of Uganda, UNHCR and WFP forced to revise Food Rations for Refugees Amid Funding Crisis (17.08.2016)

Adjumani Refugee Camp

Around 200,000 refugees who arrived in Uganda prior to July 2015 will have their food rations or cash assistance reduced by 50 percent from this week. 

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, August 17, 2016 –  The Government of Uganda – Office of the Prime Minister (OPM), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) have appealed to donors to urgently speed contributions to the humanitarian response to refugees in Uganda to end a funding shortage that has forced a revision of survival rations.

Around 200,000 refugees who arrived in Uganda prior to July 2015 will have their food rations or cash assistance reduced by 50 percent from this week. Low levels of funding, together with a large number of new arrivals fleeing to Uganda from South Sudan since 7 July, has left the refugee response with no choice but to re-prioritize their focus on those refugees in greatest need. Refugees who arrived in Uganda after July 2015, as well as those who have been identified as particularly vulnerable, such as the elderly, orphans, the chronically ill and those in need of treatment for malnutrition, will continue to receive a full ration.

Refugees receiving full rations are provided with 2,122 calories of food per person per day, in line with the minimum recommended daily allowance, during their first year, decreasing as they become increasingly self-reliant during their time in Uganda. Other refugees receive cash assistance in place of food rations, which also provides them with the opportunity to exercise greater personal choice.

“We are grateful to donors for their unwavering support so far but we appeal to the international community to do more,” said OPM Commissioner for Refugees David Apollo Kazungu.  “People are fleeing because they are afraid for their lives. Our communities are welcoming them and giving them what we can: land and hope for a better future. But our message to the international community is this: we need your help to meet their basic needs until they are able to stand on their own two feet.”

WFP requires approximately US$7 million every month to provide life-saving food assistance to refugees in Uganda. Despite the generous support of donors, the humanitarian response requires an additional US$20million to restore full food rations to refugees for the rest of the year.

“We have done everything we can to avoid this, but we have been left with no option but to reduce food assistance for many of the refugees in Uganda, in order to stretch available resources and prioritize the most vulnerable new arrivals,” said Mike Sackett, WFP’s acting Country Director for Uganda. “We hope that this is temporary, and we are working as hard as we can to raise the resources needed to restore the full level of food assistance for as many refugees as possible.”

The humanitarian response to South Sudanese refugees in Uganda was already severely underfunded before the outbreak of violence in Juba on 8 July, which has since prompted more than 70,000 people to cross the border in to Uganda. New arrivals have spoken of armed groups operating across various parts of South Sudan, attacking villages, burning down houses, murdering civilians, sexually assaulting women and girls and forcibly recruiting young men and boys in to their ranks.

“Never has the international community been more generous in its donations towards refugees,” said acting UNHCR Representative to Uganda Bornwell Kantande. “At the same time, never has the gap between what is being provided and what is needed been larger. We thank the donors for their continued generosity and support, while urging them to further fund humanitarian organizations in order that we may continue providing refugees in Uganda with the life-saving assistance they critically need.”

OPM and UNHCR lead and co-coordinate the response to the roughly 600,000 refugees and asylum seekers in Uganda, and collaborate together with the World Food Programme to provide new arrivals with life-saving food assistance. By the end of 2015, Uganda was the third-largest refugee hosting country in Africa and the eighth-largest refugee hosting country in the world.

UNICEF response to South Sudan refugee situation – Media Update (28.07.2016)

Kiryandongo

Following an inter-agency assessment mission comprising of UNHCR, Office of Prime Minister, UNICEF and other partners, a new settlement is to be opened in Yumbe district.

KAMPALA, Uganda, July 28, 2016/APO/ —

Situation

  • According to UNHCR, 2,442 South Sudanese refugees arrived on July 25, 2016 through Elegu, Moyo, Lawmo, Arua and Kiryandongo. Total number of arrivals since 17th July 2016 is 37,890.
  • 73% of all new arrivals are children; 27,660 have arrived in the last 3 weeks.
  • Following an inter-agency assessment mission comprising of UNHCR, Office of Prime Minister, UNICEF and other partners, a new settlement is to be opened in Yumbe district. This settlement could potentially host up to 100,000 refugees.
  • UNICEF has delivered 23 large tents to support services in health, child protection and education at Elegu, in Nyumanzi, Pagirinya, Rhino Camp, Maaji III and Oraba border in Arua.

UNICEF Humanitarian response

Health & Nutrition:

Immunisation: between 19-26th July 2016, 5,501 children (4,487 under five, 1,014 above five years) were immunised against Polio; 11,536 children (4,313 under-fives, 7,223 above 5 years but below 15 years old) were immunised against measles. UNICEF is supporting the Uganda National Expanded Programme on Immunisation and district authorities to ensure that all children who arrive at the various border points are immunised. Adjumani and Arua districts have enough vaccines to support the response. UNICEF and Ministry of Health have a target of 15,000 under-fives for polio and 30,000 children below 15 years for measles immunisation.

  • Nutrition: In the past 4 days, there has been an increase in the Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) among the refugees arriving at Elegu Reception Centre from 3.6% to 6.2%, an indication that the current arrivals have trekked longest or furthest.
  • From 18-26 July 2016, 4,331 children under-five were screened for nutrition and out of these, 270 are malnourished (GAM monitoring representing 6.2%). UNICEF and partner Concern Worldwide are monitoring the situation and will continue to assess the nutritional status of new arrivals.
  • 24,191 under-five children have been de-wormed to boost their immunity while 4,815 have received Vitamin A supplements to retain nutrient contents of food and facilitate normal growth.

 

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene                                

  • Five boreholes have been installed in Pagirinya refugee settlement to provide safe water to the new arrivals by UNICEF through Danish Refugee Council and Water Missions. 2,500 refugees are benefiting from boreholes.
  • UNICEF has delivered water, sanitation and hygiene supplies (10 cartons of laundry soap, 10 boxes of aqua tabs each contains 14,000 tabs, 3 mobilets, 10 handwashing facilities, 2 tins of 50 kgs of chorine power, 5 sets of latrine digging kits, 30 garbage plastic bags, 100 pieces of child potty, 20 heavy duty gloves, 20 gumboots, 20 hard brushes) to Elegu.
  • 4, 000 litres of Effective Micro-Organism (EMO) have been delivered to Adjumani to be used in Nyumanzi, Elegu reception center and Pagirinya settlements. EMO is a solution that is used for stench elimination and sludge reduction in latrines.
  • UNICEF is supporting Water Mission Uganda (WMU) to deploy additional hygiene promoters to sensitize/pass on good hygiene and sanitation practices to refugees at the Elegu reception center.
  • A pivate drilling company is on standby to drill 20 new boreholes once the new settlement area is cleared and ready to receive new arrivals.
  • Education:
    • Five tents of 72 square meters and 1 tent of 24 square meters have been delivered and mounted at Pagirinya Feeder School in Pagirinya Refugee Settlement. 1,500 new arrivals have been registered at the school which teaches pupils from Primary one-four.
    • Windle Trust, a partner with UNHCR has recruited 31 additional teachers to teach at Pagirinya Feeder School. The selection of teachers for the settlements is done by Windle Trust, UNICEF and district education officer.
    • Seven tents have been delivered and mounted at Maaji III refugee settlement. The school has a population of 3,500 in Primary one-six. The school was started in April this year.
    • 13 replenishment kits containing scholastic materials like books, chalk, pencils were delivered to Adjumani District Education Officer.

    Child Protection:

    • Tracing and Family reunification: UNICEF through its partners, Save the Children (using CPIMS)  and Uganda Red Cross has registered 139 separated children and 411 unaccompanied children in Adjumani and 1,550 separated children and 71 unaccompanied children registered by Save the Children in Kiryandongo. Both Save the Children and Uganda Red Cross are engaged in Family Tracing and reunification at the collection points, the reception and transit centres and the settlements and children are being reunified. Family tracing was done for 14 (6 female and 8 male) missing children at Elegu collection centre and reunified on spot with their families. The partners are conducting awareness rasing on child protetcion, child care and safety for new arrivals to avoid further separation and abuse of children.
    • Support and monitoring the child help desk where child related cases are reported and services provided accordingly.
    • Psychosocial support and counselling: 2,000 children have been registered at and are attending Child Friendly Space (CFS) activities in the CFS constructed in Nyumanzi refugee settlement by Save the Children with support from UNICEF, 1,066 have been registered and attending CFS activities in Kiryandongo at a child friendly space constructed by TPO.
    • All children that enter through the border points are receiving specialised psychosocial support to help deal with trauma they experience. The counselling is done under the guidance of care givers. At the child friendly spaces, experts are using play as a form of therapy. Children are encouraged to play both indoor and outdoor games. The outdoor games include football, netball, slides and sand boxes while indoor activities include story telling, drawing, chess, snakes and ladders, Ludo and omweso.
    • Behaviour Change support:UNICEF via Uganda Red Cross Society (URCS), is rolling out community engagement activities in the emergency districts. Currently URCS is conducting a behaviour change rapid assessment to inform the specific interventions to be carried out.

      Alongside this, Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials for water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), infant and young children feeding and immunization are being adapted and translated into the relevant local languages and will be distributed during interpersonal communication/social mobilisation activities. A social mobiliser’s message kit has been shared with all partners in order to disseminate key messages on Health, WASH, Nutrition, Child Protection & Education.

Press Release: Over 26,000 people flee to Uganda to escape uncertainty in South Sudan (22.07.2016)

Kiryandongo

The influx continues to be characterised by a high proportion of women and children (more than 90%).

GENEVA, Switzerland, July 22, 2016 Thousands of people continue to flee uncertainty and fighting in South Sudan. Since fighting erupted on July 7 between forces loyal to President Kiir and First Vice President Machar, 26,468 people have crossed into Uganda’s northern region, including 24,321 in the previous six days alone. The influx continues to be characterised by a high proportion of women and children (more than 90%). 

Yesterday, an estimated 8,337 refugees crossed in to Uganda from South Sudan, a new record high since the influx began and in 2016. An estimated 6,500 crossed in Elegu, 659 in Moyo, 156 in Lamwo and 642 in Oraba while 380 arrived in Kiryandongo Reception Centre.

The influx is severely stretching the capacity of collection points, transit centres and reception centres. Elegu collection point is full to the extent that it is not possible conduct a head count. New arrivals figures in Elegu are based on an analysis of trends throughout the day. On Wednesday night, more than 7,000 people slept at Elegu collection point, significantly beyond its 1,000-person capacity. Similarly, Kuluba collection point is hosting 1,099 refugees, compared to its 300-person capacity. Torrential rains are further hampering registration efforts.

New arrivals in Adjumani report continued fighting between forces loyal to President Kiir and those loyal to First Vice-President Machar. There are reports that armed gunmen continue to loot properties, forcibly recruit boys and young men, and murder civilians in Magwi.

Another Uganda People’s Defense Force convoy evacuating Ugandan nationals from South Sudan is expected today. On previous occasions, a large number of refugees have taken the opportunity to flee the country by accompanying the convoy.