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Archive for the tag “M23”

My honest letter to the newfound peacemaker President Museveni!

Dear Sir, His Excellency (H.E.) President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni!

Though I am surely not so dear to you, I am sure if you we’re ever to read one of my pieces. I would end up in Luzira or even Nalufenya, in a dungeon not seeing daylight before my mind was weaken and my thirst for liberty and justice was all over. That is what would be my ending, if you got your will. As many others who has questioned your rule and your power. They have lost their days and their lives, they have been detained and been tortured. This is something you know and done your orders. That is well-known.

So the last week has boggled me, how you at the time taking the Chairmanship of the East African Community, which goes between the Member States. Therefore, your place there after the Tanzanian President Joseph Pombe Magufuli isn’t shocking. What is more important, is the stages of your concern of the nations around you. How you suddenly want to invest your time and urges to change and give hope the republic’s around you.

That you travel on credit to London to talk on AMISOM and possible peace in Somalia, than later you travel to Tanzania and discuss the sanctions and say the EAC should be able to solve what is in-house, and today you are in South Sudan, giving advice on National Dialogue there. You are certainly occupied with other nations troubles.

In London, United Kingdom on the 12th May you said: “However, our strongly held view is that it is not enough to check Al-Shabaab. Somalia must heal completely and stand on its own feet. In our view, there are a number of bottlenecks that stop the complete healing of Somalia” (Museveni, 12.05.2017). In Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania on the 20th May you said: “Burundi is our member and no action should be taken against it without our input. Our house is our house” (Museveni, 20.05.2017). Today in Juba, South Sudan you said: “Within the party, speak frankly to each other. Reach decisions by voting or consensus. Raise issues by having regular meetings in the party. Insist on having meetings in party organs. Never use force. Violence should be a means of last resort” (Museveni, 22.05.2017).

That you suddenly are the grand peacemaker is weird, the man who done his thing civil-war and coup d’etat in Uganda, you have been involved in two wars inside the Democratic Republic of Congo, you ushered the rebellion and ruling party of Rwanda Patriotic Front/Army in Rwanda. You have sent your army without mandate into South Sudan. The other mandated forces has been operations against Lord Resistance Army in Central African Republic and the African Union Peacekeeping Mission in Somalia (AMISOM). Also, being hired security agents without consent of parliament in the Equatorial Guinea. I am sure you have used them differently, like lately the UPDF helping mission for the SPLA in Bieh State in South Sudan in April 2017. So the use of army for your own gain and the foreign exchange is also well-known.

Therefore, that you suddenly speaks of peace, negotiations and of consensus, it must be a lingo you dislike. As you yourself want to get rid of opposition in Uganda and want only the one who agree with you. Therefore, that you advice President Salva Kiir Mayardit to talk consensus, while in Buyengo Sub-County on the 9th May you said: “I am tired of wars. I want you to vote for pro-NRM members of parliament like our party flag-bearer, Mr Moses Walyomu.” (…) “I don’t want to go back to the bush to fight again. Don’t send me people who will disagree with me in parliament. I fought in 1986 and I am tired.”(Kirunda, Nakato & Katabulawo, 2017). So it is not like you believe the words you said in Juba today, aye? It seems more like a ploy and pigment of imagination, since you need to say this to look wise for the world. But we know that this isn’t the real you, you don’t believe in consensus, you believe in your vision and doesn’t trust anyone else, but yourself.

That you speak of violence as last resort, what about all the tear-gas as the opposition? What about all the harassment of them? What about all the ones detained for their political affiliation? Than, I also have to ask, why did all of the innocent had to die in violence in November 2016 in Kasese? There are so many questions, you should also answer for detaining all the kids of suspects in the killing of AIGP Andrew Kaweesi? If you doesn’t want to resolve with violence, why is the Flying Squad and the UPDF so quick to spread fear every-time there is ballots and elections. Why did you send the fighter airplanes to fly over Kampala on the days after the Presidential Election in 2016? I ask these questions since you tell people not to use violence, but speaking frankly; which I am doing to you now.

So with your history of violence, your love of guns and militarized government. I have little or to be honest. No faith in your mediation. Mr. President you have no character of trying to make peace. You have only made war and stifled your opposition. Therefore, very few of your adversaries are still alive. Most of them is gone, as well as the UNLA mates are gone and others who has stood in you way.

President Museveni, a leader and Commander-in-Chief since 1986, what sort of history and guidance can you bring from you experience and reasoning inside the Ugandan Republic, to build bridges in Burundi and South Sudan? Other than, bring the Special Forces Command and blow the possible enemies to pieces, Mr. President is that avoiding violence? Or throw tear-gas at consultation meetings of Opposition parties, is that mediation and consensus, Mr. President?

I am just asking because this is your advice… your own advice to the fellow brother in South Sudan, Somalia and in Burundi. Kinda hard to follow where you reside and run the nation, aye?

With

Best Regards

The Writer of MinBane!

Reference:

Kirunda, Abubaker; Nakato, Tausi & Katabulawo, Andrew – ‘I don’t want opposition in parliament, says President Museveni’ (09.05.2017) link: http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/I-don-t-want-opposition-in-parliament–says-President-Museveni/688334-3919496-71atniz/index.html

First Responsible and Conflict-Free Artisanal Gold Supply Chain Operational in Eastern Congo (17.05.2017)

The Just Gold project is the first to successfully trace conflict-free and legal artisanal gold from mine site to export applying regional and international standards.

KINSHASA, Democratic Republic of Congo, May 17, 2017 –  Partnership Africa Canada (PACweb.org) today announced the Just Gold project has successfully implemented a system to trace legal and conflict-free artisanal gold in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The Just Gold project began as a pilot in Ituri Province in 2015. Today’s announcement is a milestone for the project—moving it from the pilot stage—having proven a successful chain of custody from mine site to exporter.

“After almost two years of testing the Just Gold project with an aim to develop a chain of custody and due diligence system for artisanal gold in DRC, we are excited to share news of our success,” said Joanne Lebert, Partnership Africa Canada’s Executive Director.

“The Just Gold project can now move from a period of testing to implementation and ensuring we have a long-term, sustainable and viable solution for traceable, legal and conflict-free exports of artisanal gold from Congo,” said Lebert.  “We look forward to sharing our lessons learned with key actors and to deepening our collaboration with the DRC Government.”

The Just Gold project creates incentives for artisanal gold miners to channel their product to legal exporters—and eventually responsible consumers—by offering fair and transparent pricing and by providing capacity-building, such as technical assistance to miners in return for legal sales. Miners are taught better exploitation techniques and offered Juts Gold project equipment, in return for which any gold produced must be tracked and sold through legal channels.

“Proving that artisanal gold in eastern Congo can be conflict-free, legal and traceable is a major step in responsible sourcing efforts in the Great Lakes region. The government of Democratic Republic of Congo is taking major strides in complying with regional standards and demonstrating how the implementation the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains can contribute to progressive improvements in the sector, supporting artisanal gold men and women miners to enter international markets,” said Lebert.

Partnership Africa Canada signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Minister of Mines Martin Kabwelulu on September 2016, outlining support for the organization’s activities to strengthen natural resource governance. Specifically, the Ministry of Mines recognized the Just Gold project as a system of traceability and encouraged its implementation. Partnership Africa Canada has provided technical support to the Ministry since 2011.

Current activities in DRC include the Just Gold project, capacity building to implement both the International Conference on the Great Lakes (ICGLR) Regional Certification Mechanism (RCM) and the OECD Due Diligence Guidance applicable to high-value minerals, as well as support to civil society for monitoring and reporting on supply chain integrity.

Partnership Africa Canada has also undertaken research and analysis of the artisanal gold supply chain to understand women’s roles in the sector. Through sensitization and outreach, the Just Gold project improves awareness of women’s rights, and their right to access, control and benefit of resources. The project also supports and fosters women’s leadership opportunities through skills-building and training.

Partnership Africa Canada’s work in DRC developed from its engagement as a technical partner to the ICGLR, providing capacity-building to implement the six tools developed by the ICGLR’s Regional Initiative against the Illegal Exploitation of Natural Resources.

Funding for the Just Gold project and Partnership Africa Canada’s work in the Great Lakes region is provided by Global Affairs Canada. Additional funding for the Just Gold project is provided by USAID through the Capacity Building for Responsible Minerals Trade (CBRMT) project and International Organization for Migration.

Opinion: President Kabila appoints new Cabinet, but he is 141 days on overtime! (Time to leave for Togo?)

On the 19th December 2016 the last term of President Joseph Kabila went out. The Democratic Republic of Congo we’re the opposition negotiation through Conférence Episcopale Nationale du Congo (CENCO) agreement on the 31st December 2016. Still, the President hasn’t left any sign of leaving. As the Army are fighting on different front, are trying to avoid more problems, but having civil war situation in Kasai-Oriental, where the province has rebels killing and the army doing the same.

There are not been any visible signs that he is stepping down or giving way. Neither any clear signs of up-coming elections. Like there are just figment of imagination that his term went out in December 19th 2016. That is 4 months and 20 days that he is on overtime, without any consideration of the violation of the Third Republic. The Democratic Republic of Congo deserves better and should have legitimate President. Also, if you count days he has already spent total 141 days, which he shouldn’t be the Commander-in-Chief and President.

Therefore, 141 days on overtime, the news that he has unleashed a new cabinet and new set of ministers. Proves the violation and the rights of the Republic is being misused and misguided. I don’t care to look into the men and woman appointed, because that isn’t fair to the citizens of the DRC. They deserve a legit President and a regime they have elected. Not someone using the army and the resources as their personal business.

Even if on this date that the President appointed 47 Ministers and 11 Vice-Ministers. They are surely all loyal to Kabila, as they doesn’t care about the constitution, nor the laws that the Third Republic are supposed to have.

The Constitution of 2005 says clearly:

Article 70: The President of the Republic is elected by direct universal suffrage for a term of five years which is renewable only once. At the end of his term, the President stays in office until the President-Elect effectively assumes his functions” (Democratic Republic of Congo – The Constitution of 2005).

So he has had two terms, plus the waiting term after the assassination of his father, who also was President. Therefore, because of that, he has already had three terms in that respect, but only elected in two. Now he is on his fourth without any consent or ballots. That because cannot be elected as long as the Constitution is written like this. The thing that he didn’t do, like many other totalitarian leaders, they change the laws to fit their paradigm and continues “legally”. He is functioning as President while waiting to President-Elect assumes his functions. But with no election and no plan of doing so, there is no evidence of him leaving.

That is even more evident as he changes and appoint a new Cabinet, with lots of ministers loyal to him. It is within the law that he appoint ministers. Still, it is 141 days since he had legitimate powers and was the President. Right now, he shouldn’t be preoccupied with who leads Communications or where Lambert Mende is working. President Kabila, should be come a civilian or join Yayah Jammeh in Equatorial Guinea, even go to Togo like Mobotu!

After a weekend of confusing reports on Mobutu’s whereabouts, CNN confirmed on Monday that he was in Togo, escaping there early Sunday just ahead of rebels advancing on his home in the northern Zairian village of Gbadolite” (…) “Mobutu — who fled Kinshasa on Friday, the day before rebels entered the capital in force — was resting in a residence belonging to his old friend, Togolese dictator Gnassingbe Eyadema, government officials in the West African nation said” (Arnett, 1997).

So if he would do the 3rd Republic a favor, he would leave the Presidency and leave the Nation. It doesn’t seem to be possible at this point. President Kabila has not conceded or tried to give way. Therefore, the trust of him leaving power, seems day-by-day unlikely. President Kabila shows that he uses his power and capacity, as the army are loyal to him. This proves that the elections seems far-fetched, since he has not showed anything feasible or even tried to even get tenders for ballots.

That President Kabila will say elections are expensive, the are to many rebellions, that the M23 are in the Kivu’s, that FDLR are doing their thing, that ADF-NALU still existing, that the Kamunia Nsapu and other groups killing in different provinces. This will all be used as tactics to postpone the elections and make sure there are no official date for elections, nor ordering ballots or securing funds for the Commission Electorale Nationale Indépendante (CENI). They will all be left behind, since there are no plans or wish of the President to get a successor. That means he will leave all his power behind!

This new government is just a disgrace… and not respecting the Constitution of the 3rd Republic. Neither, it is clear disrespect of the people and republic. President Kabila doesn’t own the nation and the public doesn’t owe him anything, they deserves some who legitimate rule them. Time for Kabila to follow the fleeing President and leave for Togo! Peace.

Reference:

Arnett, Peter – ‘Mobutu in Togo as Zaire rebels assume leadership’ (19.05.1997) link:http://edition.cnn.com/WORLD/9705/19/zaire/index.html?eref=sitesearch

Security Council Press Statement on the Situation in the DRC (05.05.2017)

 

The members of the Security Council expressed their concern at the challenges facing the implementation of the 31 December 2016 agreement.

NEW YORK, United States of America, May 5, 2017 – The members of the Security Council continue to closely monitor the recent developments in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. They have taken note of the appointment by President Joseph Kabila, on 7 April 2017, of a new Prime Minister, Mr. Bruno Tshibala, and of the responses of national stakeholders, including the Rassemblement, as well as the 20 April 2017 statement of the Conférence Episcopale Nationale du Congo.

The members of the Security Council expressed their concern at the challenges facing the implementation of the 31 December 2016 agreement, they noted that the signatories of the agreement were unable to reach a consensus on the special arrangements of the agreement signed on 27 April by some, but not all, of the signatories of the agreement. They called on all stakeholders to redouble their efforts to achieve a greater degree of inclusivity that would help in the resolution of the very serious problems faced by the DRC. They reiterated their call for a swift implementation of the agreement, in good faith and in all its components, in order to organize peaceful, credible, inclusive and timely elections, no later than December 2017, leading to a peaceful transfer of power, in accordance with the Constitution and Security Council resolution 2348 (2017). They noted President Kabila’s expression of support, in his address to the Congress on 5 April 2017, for implementing the agreement in full. They reiterated that effective, swift and timely implementation of the agreement is critical to a credible process and the peace and stability of the DRC, as well as in supporting the legitimacy of the transitional institutions, as it represents a viable road map towards the holding of peaceful and democratic elections.

To this end, the members of the Security Council called on all parties to remain committed to the agreement and the overarching objective of peaceful, credible, free, fair and inclusive elections by the end of 2017, including through the full and equal participation of women. They called in that regard for the swift and inclusive establishment of a government of national unity, the Comité National de Suivi de l’Accord, the adoption of a new electoral law and the full implementation of the confidence building measures agreed in chapter V of the 31 December 2016 agreement, some of which are yet to be implemented. They reiterated their commitment to act accordingly regarding all Congolese actors whose actions and statements impede the implementation of the agreement and the organization of the elections.

The members of the Security Council underscored the responsibility that all Congolese political stakeholders bear at this critical juncture in their country’s history, especially by overcoming their differences to reach consensus and upholding the interests and wellbeing of their people above all other considerations, and in ensuring that they are guided by the rule of law, restraint and the spirit of compromise and dialogue. They called on all concerned political actors, whether in the DRC or abroad, to desist from any actions that could exacerbate tensions. They further called upon all political parties, their supporters, and other political actors to remain calm and refrain from violence of any kind. Recalling Security Council resolution 2348 (2017), they urged the Government as well as all relevant parties to ensure an environment conducive to the conduct of this electoral process, in accordance with the Congolese Constitution, which includes free and constructive political debate, freedom of opinion and expression, including for the press, freedom of assembly, equitable access to media including State media, the security of all political actors, freedom of movement for all candidates, as well as for elections observers and witnesses, journalists, human rights defenders and actors from civil society including women.

The members of the Security Council reiterated their condemnation of the violence witnessed in the Kasaï region over recent months and expressed serious concerns at alleged violations and abuses of human rights committed in the region. They reiterated their serious concern at serious violations of international humanitarian law committed by local militia in that region, recruitment and use of children in armed conflict in violation of applicable international law, as well as attacks on DRC security forces and symbols of State authority. They further reiterated their serious concerns at the recent reports of a number of mass graves and of killings of civilians by members of the security forces of the DRC, all of which might constitute war crimes under international law. They further expressed concerns over the deterioration of the humanitarian and security situation, which has displaced more than 1 million people internally and forced more than 11,000 people to flee the country. They underlined the urgent need for safe and unhindered access for humanitarian actors.

The members of the Security Council also reiterated the importance and urgency of prompt and transparent investigations into violations of international humanitarian law and violation or abuses of human rights in the Kasais region. They further reiterated their intention to closely monitor progress of the investigations into these violations, including the disproportionate use of force, which will be conducted jointly by the Government of the DRC, MONUSCO and the United Nations Joint Human Rights Office in the DRC, and in collaboration with the AU, as announced by the Government of the DRC, in order to bring to justice and hold accountable all those responsible, and they look forward to their results.

The members of the Security Council stressed the need for a swift and full investigation into the killing of the two members of the Group of Experts established pursuant to Security Council resolution 1533 (2004) and underlined the need for full cooperation from the Government of the DRC. In this context, they further welcomed the Secretary General’s establishment of a UN Board of Inquiry to investigate the deaths of the two experts and his commitment that the United Nations will do everything possible to ensure that the perpetrators are brought to justice.

The members of the Security Council reaffirmed their strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, unity, and territorial integrity of the DRC.

The members of the Security Council reiterated their support to the efforts of the Special Representative of the Secretary General, the African Union and regional organizations in helping to ensure the full implementation of the 31 December 2016 agreement, in accordance with Security Council resolution 2348 (2017).

RDC: Lettre – “Motion de Censure contre le Gouvernment provincial du Haut-Lomami” (02.05.2017)

RDC: Communiqué de l’UDPS du 02 mai 2017

VII Session Extraordinaire du CEEAC – Communique Finale du Conseil des Ministres (29.04.2017)

RDC: Memorandum de la Jeunesse Katumbiste du Nord Kivu au Representant Special du Secretaire General des Nations Unies en RD Congo – “Obtension de l’Abandon des Poursuites Judiciaires Contre l’Honnorable Moise Katumbi Shapwe et Son Retour au Pays” (26.04.2017)

RDC: Communication du Bureau Politique de la Majorite Presidentielle (22.04.2017)

RDC: Declaration de la Conference Episcopale Nationale du Congo sur la Situation Socio-Politique Actuelle en RD Congo (20.04.2017)

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