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Archive for the tag “International Court of Justice”

Somaliland: Ministry of Foreign Affairs & International Cooperation – Press Statement (01.07.2019)

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Somalia: Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation – Press Statement (01.07.2019)

Somalia: Ministry of Health & Human Services – Letter to UN Agencies, Donors and International Partners (25.05.2019)

Somalia: Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation Statement on blocked entry for Somali MPs in Kenya (21.05.2019)

Somalia: Hormuud Telecom – Press Release (27.03.2019)

Somalia: Federal Republic of Somalia – Permanent Mission to the United Nations has written to all permanent missions to the UN in New York (05.03.2019)

UK finally lost the Chagos Archipelago to Mauritius!

Sir Paul Gore-Booth, senior official at the Foreign Office, wrote to a diplomat in 1966: “We must surely be very tough about this. The object of the exercise is to get some rocks which will remain ours… There will be no indigenous population except seagulls…”” (BBC – ‘The Chagos Islands: A sordid tale’ 03.11.2000)

The Neo-Colonial Relic, the islands that departed unfairly in the 1960s, which the United Kingdom and its allies has made into a strategic military is now deemed illegal by the International Court of Justice.

That was about time, as the Republic of Mauritius is getting their territories back. This because the Her Majesties Government back in 1968 didn’t decolonize Mauritius properly. They clearly overstepped their boundaries and took the administrative role. As they ensured control and also made both Mauritius Nationals and Chagossian people into refugees and migrants. As they had to resettle elsewhere, because the United Kingdom took over the land.

Therefore, today’s legal judgement in the International Court Justice, have voted in favour of Mauritius and their claims to the islands, this means the United States and United Kingdom have to vacate or make arrangements directly with Mauritius, as they took the Archipelago without justification.

As it has stated today:

Is of the opinion that, having regard to international law, the process of decolonization of Mauritius was not lawfully completed when that country acceded to independence in 1968, following the separation of the Chagos Archipelago; Is of the opinion that the United Kingdom is under an obligation to bring to an end its administration of the Chagos Archipelago as rapidly as possible; Is of the opinion that all Member States are under an obligation to co-operate with the United Nations in order to complete the decolonization of Mauritius” (International Court Justice, 25.02.2019).

This shouldn’t be shock, as this have been written about a decade ago: “Two chapters in particular are world-class journalism, reaching the heights of Pilger’s old friend and mentor Martha Gellhorn. “Stealing a Nation” tells the shamefully under-reported story of how the British government ethnically cleansed thousands of its own citizens – a “crime against humanity”, according to the International Criminal Court. In secrecy, during the late 1960s and early 1970s, British governments “tricked, coerced and finally expelled the entire population” of the Chagos Islands in the Indian Ocean, to give the principal island, Diego Garcia, a paradise, to the Americans for a military base”” (Johann Harri – ‘Freedom Next Time, by John Pilger’ 09.07.2006, Independent).

So, today, this wrong is hopefully ending. That the theft of the islands in favour of a military base is soon undone. As the International Community should care for what it takes away. The sins of the past, which has hurt the Mauritius Nationals and Chagossians there. They should be relieved and also patch their hurt. Since, the United Kingdom and United States of America has held the islands without rights.

Their imperialistic and neo-colonial behaviour has been the pre-text for these actions. Seemingly, done it without any fuzz. Now, they should move on and even back-pay for the damages done to archipelago there. Mauritius and their population deserves so. Peace.

Kenya: Ministry of Foreign Affairs – Press Statement on Kenya-Somalia Relations 21st February 2019 (21.02.2019)

Press Release – Ongwen case: the confirmation of charges hearing to be held at the seat of the ICC in The Hague (28.10.2015)

dominic_ongwen_and_icc__dr_meddy

Situation: Uganda
Case: The Prosecutor v. Dominic Ongwen

Today, 28 October 2015, the Presidency of the International Criminal Court (ICC) decided that the confirmation of charges hearing in the case concerning Dominic Ongwen, scheduled for 21 January 2016, shall be held at the seat of the Court at The Hague (Netherlands).

On 10 September 2015, the ICC Pre-Trial Chamber II had recommended to the ICC Presidency that that holding the confirmation of charges hearing in Uganda would be desirable and in the interests of justice. Following consultations with the Ugandan authorities, the ICC Presidency received an updated assessment from the Court’s Registry on the feasibility of holding the confirmation of charges hearing in Uganda.

The ICC Presidency noted the excellent co‑operation of Uganda in assisting the Registry with the preparation of its preliminary and final assessments. The Presidency noted also that there would be a number of benefits to holding the hearing in Uganda as in principle this would contribute to a better perception of the Court and bring the proceedings closer to the communities affected by the alleged crimes. However, the Presidency noted particularly the possibility, expressed by Uganda itself, that political tensions may increase during an upcoming electoral period, especially during January 2016, which may have an adverse impact on the Court. The Presidency also noted operational limitations, in particular concerns that holding proceedings in Uganda would significantly impact the Court’s resources during its move to its permanent premises scheduled for December 2015. For these reasons, the ICC Presidency found that the potential benefits of holding the confirmation hearing in Uganda in January 2016 are outweighed by the significant risks

The confirmation of charges hearing in respect of Dominic Ongwen is scheduled to commence on 21 January 2016 and is expected to last three to no more than five working days. The confirmation of charges hearing is not a trial. It is a Pre-Trial hearing held to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to commit the case for trial before a Trial Chamber.

Decision on the recommendation to the Presidency to hold the confirmation of charges hearing in the Republic of Uganda

Background:  Dominic Ongwen was the alleged Brigade Commander of the Sinia Brigade of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). On 8 July 2005, ICC Judges issued an arrest warrant against Mr Ongwen for 3 counts of crimes against humanity (murder; enslavement; inhumane acts of inflicting serious bodily injury and suffering) and 4 counts of war crimes (murder; cruel treatment of civilians; intentionally directing an attack against a civilian population; pillaging) allegedly committed on or about 20 May 2004 at the Lukodi IDP Camp in the Gulu District. On 16 January 2015, Dominic Ongwen was surrendered to the ICC’s custody and transferred to the ICC Detention Centre on 21 January 2015. His initial appearance before the Court took place on 26 January 2015.

ICC-CPI-20150910-PR1148: Ongwen case: Pre-Trial Chamber II recommends holding the confirmation of charges hearing in Uganda; ICC Presidency’s decision to be made in due course (10.09.2015)

Ongwen

Situation: Uganda
Case: The Prosecutor v. Dominic Ongwen

On 10 September 2015, Pre-Trial Chamber II of the International Criminal Court (ICC) recommended to the ICC Presidency that the hearing on the confirmation of charges against Dominic Ongwen, be held in the Republic of Uganda. The ICC Presidency will now consult with the Ugandan authorities and make a decision on this matter, in consultation with the Pre-Trial Chamber, in due course.

The confirmation of charges hearing in respect of Dominic Ongwen is scheduled to commence on 21 January 2016 and is expected to last three to no more than five working days. The confirmation of charges hearing is not a trial. It is a Pre-Trial hearing held to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to commit the case for trial before a Trial Chamber.

The Chamber considers that it would be desirable and in the interest of justice to hold the confirmation of charges hearing in Uganda, preferably in Gulu as this location is the closest to the location of the alleged crimes, or alternatively in Kampala. Also, the Chamber is of the view that the hearing on the confirmation of charges is well suited to achieve the ultimate purpose of holding proceedings away from the seat of the Court, as it is a short, self-contained, discrete procedural step. In addition, the Chamber considers that the estimated costs of organising the confirmation of charges hearing in Uganda do not appear disproportionate.

Prior to making this recommendation, the Chamber received an assessment of the ICC Registry as to the possibility of holding the confirmation of charges hearing in Uganda, as well as submissions of the Office of the Prosecutor and the Defence both in favour of attempting to bring the Court’s process closer to the communities affected by the alleged crimes.

Pursuant to Rule 100 of the Rules of Procedure and Evidence, where the Court considers that it would be in the interests of justice, it may decide to sit in a State other than the host State, for such period or periods as may be required, to hear the case in whole or in part.

dominic_ongwen_and_icc__dr_meddy

Background:  Dominic Ongwen was the alleged Brigade Commander of the Sinia Brigade of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). On 8 July 2005, ICC Judges issued an arrest warrant against Mr Ongwen for 3 counts of crimes against humanity (murder; enslavement; inhumane acts of inflicting serious bodily injury and suffering) and 4 counts of war crimes (murder; cruel treatment of civilians; intentionally directing an attack against a civilian population; pillaging) allegedly committed on or about 20 May 2004 at the Lukodi IDP Camp in the Gulu District. On 16 January 2015, Dominic Ongwen was surrendered to the ICC’s custody and transferred to the ICC Detention Centre on 21 January 2015. His initial appearance before the Court took place on 26 January 2015.

 

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