MinBane

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Archive for the tag “IDP”

Opinion: We never learn, the conflicts doesn’t stop!

This year has been bloody and the doomsday switch is itching. The trigger fingers are used on dozens of battlefields. Some places with hope of peace and of just rule. It is other places, which is in dire need of change and quickly. The are continuation of wars and conflicts. Internally and across borders. There are possible new problems and making it more hectic. As so many nations have porous borders where militias and armies are floating in between. Since also even with supposed arms blockade to certain conflict zones, the merchants of death is delivering their loads.

The battles continues, the ramifications of innocent lives, villages burnt and kids disappearing. The utter violence and crimes against humanity. That get touched and burned for war-lords, generals and Presidents to stay in power. While AID and NGOs are afraid of sending help and often also stopped. The United Nations might have troops in the nearby area, but easier to get a towing vehicle, than armed supported of a IDP Camp. The insurgency and the escalations, the results is death.

It happens, as the world is looking at Premier League, NBA and Formula One. It is happening while Miss Universe is lost on a God-Forsaken Island. We never know why these innocent lives had to die. We just read the numbers in small notices in the papers and moves on.

That is not justice, that is not right. We didn’t learn anything. Nothing. It continues daily in South Sudan, Somalia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan, Yemen, Burma, Burundi, Mali, Niger, Cameroon, Nigeria and the list goes on. To many nations have internal conflicts or conflicts across their borders. Where merchants are securing the deaths of the innocent.

It happen all through the year. It didn’t stop. It continues and we just watch. We let it happen right under our nose for all sort of different reasons. This isn’t the big-man complex within me, this is the man who questions the world order and wonder when will it stop. We should not accept these deaths. It could be me and next time you. Who knows when conflicts will strike our shores and our clan. We never know, the future is not written yet, but we can make sure that doesn’t happen to them. That we shield and stop the aggressors. The endless violence and death. The destruction of society, of families and of basic functions.

Where the men and soldiers with the guns are respected and the law, where the respect and protocol is bypassed. Where the institutions and the general code of law is undermined at any moment. Where the bullet has the final say, where the use of weapons and ammunition; is the final outcome to any trade. The justice is what the guns say and the ones that uses them. The ones that is supplying it, is making sure the vote get heard and the War-Lord get signed off.

The determination and the lack of will, the mismanagement and the international community lack of acknowledge the reality. The blood-thirst and the power-hungry individuals who rule and who uses this to silence the public. Send them packing and fleeing. Take their lands and the resources. Secure their future, while the majority is in utter disgrace in foreign lands. They fear and wonder when peace will be in their village and around their home. If it is safe and if the government will promise their safety.

This is what we should be afraid of, that people are afraid of their homes and their lands. That they are afraid of returning, because they know that they might lose their lives and also their children. This is the evidence of the crime that is committed. What is taken from these people. We learned nothing in 2017, as the conflicts are continuing and no peace in sight. No justice and no respect for human dignity, as more innocent lives are taken away everyday before their time. Peace.

Kenya: Statement on the Latest Attacks in Baringo County (15.03.2017)

Kenya: CS Nkaissery Declaration of Certain Administrative Locations of Baringo County as Disturbed and Dangerous Areas (28.01.2017)

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Immediate Suspension of All Operation in Baringo County by The Kenya Red Cross Society (25.02.2017)

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Kenya: Human Rights Violations and Brutality on Residents of Baringo (23.02.2017)

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Press Release: Forgotten People – “Where is the Money?” (08.08.2016)

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Press Statement: UNMAS Media Advisory: Team of Explosive Detection Dogs arrives in South Sudan (27.05.2016)

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JUBA, South Sudan, May 27, 2016The presence of explosive detection dogs (EDD) will be increased throughout the country and today, the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) South Sudan will receive 37 new EDDs. These dogs are valuable team members who work hard to protect vulnerable populations in South Sudan. The EDD regularly support United Nations Police (UNPOL) to conduct searches of protection of civilians sites, cargo and entry points, to detect prohibited or hazardous items, all of which are swiftly removed by UNPOL so that internally displaced people (IDP), and others under UNMISS protection, remain safe from harm. Currently UNMAS has six EDD teams which focus on entry point control and cargo searches in Juba. In 2015, 19,781 vehicles, 13,587 bags and 970 buildings were searched using these teams.
Upon arrival, the dogs will be transferred to temporary kennels in Gumbo, Juba, where they will be acclimatized and paired with their future handlers. Once the dogs are settled they will be paired with expert handlers who will complete additional training with the dogs, which is tailored specifically to South Sudan. While some of the dogs will remain in Juba, to work at the UN Thom Ping Base, UN House the POC sites and the UN airport, many will be transferred to Bentiu, Bor and Malakal.

It should be emphasized that the dogs are working animals and they have been specially trained to perform the roles they will undertake. They are safe and friendly animals and they have all be screened for illness and disease and provided with necessary vaccinations. The welfare of the dogs is of prime importance to UNMAS, as is the safety of the communities within which they will be working.

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Taken from Washington Post in 2011 or so.

Press Release: UN agencies concerned about limited funding to assist South Sudanese refugees in Sudan (25.04.2016)

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NEW YORK, United States of America, April 25, 2016 –  The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today expressed deep concern at funding shortfalls which could affect the assistance that is being provided to South Sudanese refugees in Sudan.

 “Our resources are being stretched at a time when needs are quickly growing,” said UNHCR’s Representative in Sudan, Mohammed Adar.  “Over 50,000 South Sudanese have crossed into Sudan since the beginning of 2016, surpassing the planning figure set for the entire year. Further shortfalls in funding will hamper our ability to continue providing assistance for the existing South Sudanese refugees in Sudan while also responding to the emergency needs of new arrivals.”  UNHCR humanitarian requirements for 2016 remain 18% funded, leaving over US$128 million in unmet needs.

The heads of UNICEF and WFP have voiced similar concerns about the limited resources available to respond to the basic needs of South Sudanese seeking refuge in Sudan, including access to clean water, shelter, emergency household supplies and adequate protection.  The situation is particularly worrisome as the agencies’ funding shortages coincide with a period of heightened food insecurity in part of South Sudan. This, in addition to the ongoing violence, is driving rapidly increasing numbers of South Sudanese into Sudan.

The UNICEF Sudan Representative, Geert Cappelaere, also warns that his organisation is running out of funding for the provision of critical support to more than 100,000 children from South Sudan in dire need of urgent humanitarian assistance. “With only 11% of the total humanitarian requirement funded so far in 2016 and an estimated US$105 million shortfall, UNICEF is gravely concerned it may have to cut back on crucial lifesaving water, sanitation, nutrition, health and protection assistance to those vulnerable children”, Cappelaere emphasised.

Echoing the concern of his UNICEF and UNHCR colleagues, WFP Representative and Country Director Adnan Khan said: “We are concerned that if we do not receive sufficient funding soon enough, we will not be able to respond to the needs of South Sudanese refugees who continue to flee their country to seek food and refuge.”

WFP is currently facing a 12-month funding shortfall of US$181 million of which US$19 million will be used to meet the needs of the South Sudanese refugees through its Protracted Relief and Recovery Operation.

UNICEF, UNHCR and WFP have banded together to appeal for additional funding that will be required to meet greater needs created by the rapidly increasing number of South Sudanese fleeing into Sudan.  

Conflict and food insecurity are forcing more and more South Sudanese to flee their country and cross into neighbouring countries.  A total of 678,000 South Sudanese refugees are now being hosted in the neighbouring countries with 221,000 in Sudan.

Interview with David Lomuria from Juba on return of rebel leader to South Sudan (Youtube-Clip)

 

Press Release – DR Congo: concerns for thousands of people who fled violence in Mpati area, North Kivu (13.04.2016)

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GENEVA, Switzerland, April 13, 2016The top United Nations humanitarian official in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has voiced concern over the fate of more than 35,000 people who, in the past three weeks, have fled the area of Mpati, in the Masisi Territory of North Kivu province, following clashes between the Congolese army and armed groups.
Since 27 March five sites for internally displaced persons (IDP) have been emptied, forcing thousands to seek safety in surrounding villages. Although some who fled the fighting have started to return, the situation remains volatile and of great concern.

“The past days have been difficult for those IDPs forced to leave the sites, prevented by the clashing forces from returning to those sites, and unable to get the humanitarian assistance that they need. I am deeply concerned by the situation,” the Humanitarian Coordinator in DR Congo, Dr Mamadou Diallo, said today.

Access to the area has been difficult, notably because of the clashes. However, since 4 April, a number of humanitarian organizations have reached the area to evaluate the needs of the affected people. The Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), mandated to coordinate the humanitarian response, is leading a mission to the area of Mpati.

Rein Paulsen, Head of OCHA in DRC, reiterates the importance of unhindered access to areas of need. “Access is paramount to our work, it is vital for humanitarian partners to reach the people in need,” Mr. Paulsen said.

Violence in North Kivu, affecting both civilians and aid organizations, has been rising since late 2014 resulting in renewed displacement. The renewed displacement is taking place amid a shrinking of humanitarian funding while needs remain great. During the current military operations in Mpati area, there have been threats of forced site closures, a concerning issue for humanitarian actors which has been the subject of high-level engagement, including by the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon during a recent mission to DRC. The threat of forced site closures is particularly concerning as the humanitarian community and authorities in North Kivu have agreed on a strategy to draw down the number of sites in North Kivu.

The Humanitarian Coordinator has been advocating to ensure that any site closure respects internationally agreed standards regarding IDPs. In a high-level forum held on 05 April in Kinshasa, the Humanitarian Coordinator stressed again that while DRC has the right to close IDP sites, the role of the humanitarian community is to ensure that such closures “are in line with DRC’s obligations under international humanitarian law”. He added that the humanitarian community is ready to work closely with the Congolese authorities in identifying and implementing durable solutions to the problem of displacement in Eastern DRC.

“Such solutions must be anchored in the Kampala Convention,” the Humanitarian Coordinator said today in reference to the African Union Convention on the Protection of Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa to which DRC is party.

North Kivu has about 781,000 IDPs, of whom 30 per cent are in one of the 53 displacement sites. There are seven IDP sites in the Mpati area hosting more than 45,000 people.

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