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Archive for the tag “Human Rights Couuncil of Ethiopia”

Ethiopia: OPM – Government Support to Displaced Gedeo (16.03.2019)

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Ethiopia: ONLF Press Release (23.01.2019)

The Somali people in the Somali regional state(Ogaden) have a legal right to manage their political affairs and full self-rule upheld both by the Ethiopian constitution and international law. The most fundamental tenet of these entitlements is the right to choose their own leaders. Furthermore, Premier Abiy has promised to all peoples in Ethiopia to respect their democratic rights and open the political space.

ONLF calls for both the ruling party and the federal government to respect the wishes and dignity of the Somali people and desist from any acts that could jeopardise the stability and the wellbeing of the Somali regional state and the people.

Any political differences shall be resolved in a transparent manners where all stakeholders are consulted.

ONLF is committed to peace and democratic governance in the Somali state and Ethiopia in general and calls upon all stakeholders to adhere to the same principles.

Finally, ONLF calls upon the ruling party in the Somali state to resolve any difference internally in an amicable and transparent manner.

ONLF

23/01/2019

A Silent War: Persistent fatalities in the Ogaden Region

People are steady praising the reforms of Addis Ababa without recognizing that the state and the authorities are still violently oppressing people. The Oromo isn’t in the same regards as before, because of the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Defence Force (EPRDF) have now Prime Minister Dr. Abiy Ahmed Ali, who is a Oromo himself. That is why the besieged regions of the past isn’t as much. Even as the Amhara and Ogaden, still has it coming.

The Prime Minister have made peace with Eritrea, Djibouti and Somalia. Where the troops close to the border with Eritrea is promised to cease to exist or to be redeployed. The Ethiopian troops is steady and active within the Federal Republic of Somalia. Still, the narrative, that everything has turned funky dory in Ethiopia. Isn’t all true.

That the ones who asked for better pay and went to the Prime Minister office in Addis Ababa, the young soldiers doing so is charged with 14 years in prison. That is a proof, that the state still expect respect first and later will retaliate.

The EPRDF is also trying to make peace with opposition groups, that is to show signs of betterment, but still, there should be doubts. Since there are still violent activity and killings going on. There is steady ambushes and killings in the Ogaden Region. It has been going on all of the month of December and November. Not, that it has hit the headlines, because the agreements made with Ginabot 7 (G7), Oromo Liberation Front, (OLF), Afar People’s Liberation Front (APLF), Ogaden National Liberation Front (ONLF) and Tigray People’s Democratic Movement (TPDM).

All of those agreements and movements are good news. But, likewise the sad news is that in Moyale on the 15th December, there was report of 25 Somalian killed in the town. This as Oromo militias are targeting the Somali citizens of the region and does it systematically. That should be worrying, but not like the Police either. Why I am saying it is systematic, is that on the 13th December, the same militia assaulted 60 people in the same town and killed another 17 Somali citizens there. That means around 40 people died within a week. If that isn’t striking, nothing is, but because the reforms and positive vibes comes from the capital. That overshadow the dire distress and hurt done in the Ogaden region. Which shouldn’t be forgotten in the scheme of things. Just like the distress and hurt under the State of Emergency in Oromia and Amhara of recent years. All of this should be messaged about.

Because this is lives in general, that is taken out by one group going against another. This is the group (Oromo) who was oppressed strongly during the EPRDF era. Now they are generating a para-military militia avenging their own oppression with killings in the Ogaden. This is the Oromo people attacking and killing Somali civilians. That should be told and not forgotten, as the authorities are not stopping them. The continuation of the killings should be remembered and the lost ones. Shall, not be revenged, but get justice for. So, that the ones who are in-charge and the ones who pushes this to happen. Get their punishment through court of justice.

The lives taken in Ogaden must be remembered. These lives has value and their lives deserves credit. As they were lives taken for another groups will to annex and control it.

The EPRDF if it was a reforming force, who cared about the lives in the Republic. They would have reacted and not let the continued violence happen, but they do. It continues and the Police Force, the army doesn’t stop it. Even when it persist, they are looking the other way. That is the sad reality. What is even worse. Is that the amounts of killings doesn’t make headlines or bothers any of the allies of Addis Ababa. As the villages, the border-town and other places are burning, the people are dying and the Oromo para-military groups are allowed to their part in the Ogaden region. Peace.

Ethiopia congratulates the people and the Government of the State of Eritrea on the lifting of the sanctions (14.11.2018)

Joint Press Statement following the visit by the Foreign Ministers of Eritrea and Ethiopia to Mogadishu Somalia, October 2018 (17.10.2018)

Eritrea: Peace deal prompts hope of internal reforms, to improve fundamental human rights (19.09.2018)

The peace agreement between Eritrea and Ethiopia has raised hopes that improving human rights will be front and centre on Eritrea’s path forward, according to a United Nations Special Rapporteur on Tuesday.

DAKAR, Senegal, September 19, 2018 -On 9 July, leaders of both countries signed a Joint Declaration of Peace and Friendship, raising expectations that the end of the “no war, no peace” stalemate between them, would positively impact Eritrea’s internal human rights situation.

The thaw in relations between the neighbouring countries, who fought a bloody, unresolved war in the late 1990s, began earnestly in June, when Ethiopia’s newly-elected leader, Abiy Ahmed, made peace overtures to his counterpart.

Eritrean authorities must urgently embrace and implement bold measures to strengthen protection of and respect for human rights, justice and accountability – UN Rapporteur

Yet, repression reportedly continues within Eritrea.

“During the past 17 years, the Government of Eritrea has maintained tight control over the country, stifling any form of public debate and participation,” said Sheila B. Keetharuth, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Eritrea.

Eleven government officials who had criticised the President in an open letter, along with 10 independent journalists, were arrested in 2001 – silencing public political discourse an

“I have received reports that the former Minister of Finance,” Ms. Keetharuth continued, “who recently wrote two books on the current state of affairs in the country, including the rule of law, has been arrested in Asmara during the morning of 17 September.”

If confirmed, the arrest, on the eve of the 2001 clampdown anniversary, would question the will for genuine reform, “especially regarding respect for fundamental rights and freedoms,” the expert asserted.

According to Ms. Keetharuth, while comprehensive domestic reforms would be required for a free, fair, democratic society with all human rights entitlements, the Government can take immediate action towards that end in three concrete, urgent areas.

Firstly, the families of prisoners who have disappeared in Eritrean jails should be informed about the fate of their loved ones. Secondly, implementing the 1997 Constitution would provide a natural basis for a national legal framework and a society governed by the rule of law. And thirdly, the Government could inform new military conscripts that they would not have to serve beyond the 18 months stipulated by Eritrean law.

“The achievement of peace between Eritrea and Ethiopia must be duly celebrated,” stated Ms. Keetharuth. “However, Eritrean authorities must urgently embrace and implement bold measures to strengthen protection of and respect for human rights, justice and accountability,” she concluded.

Special Rapporteurs are appointed by the Geneva-based UN Human Rights Council to examine and report back on a specific human rights theme or a country situation. The unpaid positions are honorary, and independent from any government or organization.

 

‘Wind of hope’ blowing through Horn of Africa says UN chief, as Ethiopia and Eritrea sign historic peace accord (17.09.2018)

NEW YORK, USA, September 17, 2018 –  There is a powerful wind of hope blowing across the Horn of Africa region, said UN chief António Guterres on Sunday, in Saudi Arabia to witness the signing of a peace agreement between Ethiopia and Eritrea, ending decades of simmering conflict.

Saudi Arabia facilitated the agreement, and in a message on Twitter, the Foreign Ministry said that the accord, signed in Jeddah “is a historic milestone for the peoples of Ethiopia and Eritrea, and will contribute to strengthening security and stability in the region at large”.

“The signature of the peace agreement between the President of Eritrea and the Prime Minister of Ethiopia is indeed a historic event,” said the Secretary-General, speaking at a press conference following the signing in Saudi Arabia’s second-largest city, on the Red Sea coast, with Foreign Minister Adel Aljubeir.

“We have seen a conflict that has lasted for decades, ending, and that has a very important meaning in a world where we see, unfortunately, so many conflicts multiplying, and lasting forever,” added Mr. Guterres.

He expressed his “deep appreciation” for the role played by Saudi Arabia, before paying tribute “on one hand to the courage, the vision, the wisdom of the Prime Minister of Ethiopia – who has had the capacity to overcome enormous resistance from the past and open a new chapter in the history of his country – and also the way the President of Eritrea has promptly responded to his peace initiatives.”

The thaw in relations between the neighbouring countries, who fought a bloody, unresolved war in the late 1990s, began in earnest in June, when Ethiopia’s newly-elected leader, Abiy Ahmed, made peace overtures to his counterpart, which have now come to fruition.

Seizing on the implications for the whole region, Mr. Guterres said that the agreement meant that “there is a wind of hope blowing in the Horn of Africa. It is not only the peace between Ethiopia and Eritrea – it is the fact that tomorrow and the day after tomorrow we will have, here in Saudi Arabia, the President of Djibouti and the President of Eritrea – two countries that have also been at odds with each other.”

According to news reports, Eritrea and Djibouti announced on Friday that they would also normalize diplomatic relations with each other following a falling out on the border, in 2008, which left several dead and resulted in prisoners being taken on both sides.

The UN chief also noted the peace agreement between the President and his former Vice President in South Sudan, that was signed on Thursday – in Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa – as another indicator of real diplomatic movement across the Horn of Africa and its borders.

“I want to say that this window of hope is enormously important in a world where, unfortunately, hope has been very scarce,” added the Secretary-General.

Somalia’s destiny lies in the hands of the people, highlights outgoing UN envoy (14.09.2018)

Despite remarkable achievements in Somalia in the recent past, structural challenges remain and continue to undermine the country’s security and political stability, the United Nations envoy for the country has warned.

DAKAR, Senegal, September 14, 2018 – Briefing the Security Council for the last time in his capacity as UN Special Representative for Somalia, Michael Keating called on all Somalis to draw strength from the positive transformations going on inside the country and work collectively for the common good.

“The future of Somalia is in the hands of the Somalis,” he declared.

In particular, Mr. Keating – who also heads the UN Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) – urged unity among political leaders.

“The more [they] show unity, the greater the opportunity, and the responsibility, of international partners to invest in all parts of the country and its leadership,” he said.

In his remarks, Mr. Keating highlighted four key concerns the country’s leaders need to address, and issues that the international community should keep focusing on.

These include the threat posed by the Al Shabaab and other extremist groups; the risk of political differences overshadowing progress in legislative, reform and security areas; fragmentation within the international community; and the danger of a humanitarian “catastrophe”, especially with most of the population already living in precarious circumstances due to climate change and other vulnerabilities.

“Future crises will result from the combination of climate related shocks; armed conflict provoked by Al Shabaab and unresolved grievances; competition over natural resources; and systemic marginalization of certain groups,” warned Mr. Keating. He underscored the need to reduce the vulnerability faced by ordinary Somalis, through job creation and smart investments that safeguard natural resources and help unlock the enormous economic potential of the country.

Besides political will, Mr. Keating underscored, success will depend on leaders from the political, business and traditional spheres “working together for the common good, leveraging the country’s potential wealth to transform prospects for people – especially the young.”

On 1 October, Nicholas Haysom will replace Mr. Keating as the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Somalia and the head of UNSOM. Mr. Keating was appointed the top UN official in the Horn of Africa nation in November 2015.

Women have brought ‘important voices’ to Somali politics

Alongside Mr. Keating, Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, the Executive Director of the UN gender equality and empowerment agency for women and girls (UN Women) highlighted the “once-in-a-generation opportunity” that Somalia currently has to establish lasting peace, and gender equality.

She commended the nation for improving representation of women in public office, illustrated by the “jump” in women’s representation in parliamentary elections from 14 to nearly 25 per cent of seats in the most recent elections.

This progress, she underscored, has brought many “important voices” to Somali politics.

She said it had brought to the centre “the fight to end child marriage, end female genital mutilation (FGM), and change laws that discriminate against women,” noting that the participation of women will be further boosted if more leaders, especially clan leaders, embrace gender equality and support women.

She also called on the international community and the Security Council to support Somalia’s federal and provincial authorities, advance gender equality, act strongly against sexual and gender-based violence, advocate for meaningful participation and recognition of women in all sectors, and support women’s groups in the country.

“Women’s organizations in Somalia are organized. They are dedicated to their country: they are activists, advocates, entrepreneurs, professionals, and patriots,” said Ms. Mlambo-Ngcuka, noting that as the country prepares to confront the challenges in the days ahead, “women will make the difference.”

Somalia: Food security improving but recovery remains fragile (02.09.2018)

Djibouti: President Ismail Omar Guelleh letter to Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali on the killings in Dire Dawa (09.08.2018)

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