Burundi: EU closes consultations under Article 96 of the Cotonou agreement (14.03.2016)

EU Burundi 14.03.2016

Burundi parades alleged Rwandan spy (Youtube-Clip)

“Security forces in Burundi have paraded a man accused of being a Rwandan spy before journalists, as tensions between the two countries simmer amid a ten-month-long political crisis. The man, whose name was given as Corporal Rucyahintare Cyprien, was arrested on Monday near the Rwandan border, according to police spokesman Pierre Nkurikiye.”He was on a spying mission and it was the third such mission he carried out in Burundi,” said Nkurikiye, who added that the missions were intended to “dest…READ MORE : http://www.africanews.com/2016/03/13/… ” (Africa News, 2016)

“A Rwandan Affirms to be a Millitary Spy in Burundi”

“On this Saturday 12th March, the Burundian police has shown to the journalist a Rwandan who asserts to be a military spy of the Rwandan army with a grade of caporal, he was arrested on Burundi soil” (Iwacu Web TV, 2016).

Press Release: Number of Burundian Refugees Tops 250,000, Says UNHCR (07.03.2016)

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GENEVA, March 7 – With tension remaining high in Burundi, the number of people who have sought shelter in neighbouring states has now passed the 250,000 mark, UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency notes, cautioning that people continue to flee and numbers could rise further.

UNHCR’s latest figures show that 250,473 people have been registered as refugees in Democratic Republic of the Congo (21,186); Rwanda (73,926); Tanzania (131,834); Uganda (22,330); and Zambia (1,197) since early April last year, when President Pierre Nkurunziza announced plans to run for a third term, which he later won.

The average rate of new arrivals per week is more than 1,000 in Tanzania, 500 in Uganda, 230 in Rwanda and 200 in Democratic Republic of the Congo. There have been small numbers of spontaneous returns.

Lusenda Burundi Refugee Camp

“Cool heads and continuing international attention are needed to avert further deterioration this year, and the right to leave the country and seek asylum should be respected,” UNHCR spokesperson Melissa Fleming told a news briefing in Geneva.

“Despite recent high-level efforts to engage the government, we have not seen significant improvement in the security and human rights situation on the ground. The deteriorating economic situation is also a cause for concern which could trigger further displacement,” she added.

“Although there has been a slight lull in violence recently in Burundi, refugees arriving in the host countries continue to report human rights violations and difficulty in leaving Burundi. We have also been receiving a growing number of refugee reports about detention and sexual and gender-based violence in transit,” Fleming said.

Some 1,700 Burundian refugees have arrived in Democratic Republic of the Congo so far this year, down on the 2,051 of October last year, but still a steady flow. Many are living in poor rural areas, where conditions are harsh, and about two-thirds (14,772) are in Lusenda camp, which is nearing its capacity of 18,000.

Overcrowding is a problem in all host countries, including Tanzania, which has taken in more Burundians than any other. Nyarugusu camp hosts some 143,000 people, including almost 80,000 who have arrived since last April. The decongestion of the camp is a priority and new arrivals go to Ndutu, while others at Nyarugusu are sent to the recently reopened Mutendeli camp. Another camp is planned at Karago, but capacity there and at Mutendeli is limited by insufficient water reserves.

Nakivale Refugee Camp Isingiro District

In Rwanda, close to 48,000 Burundian refugees are living in Mahama camp, the largest camp in Rwanda, and more than 26,400 in Kigali and other towns. As the insecurity persists in Burundi they are running out of savings, which will increase their need for assistance. The Rwandan government, meanwhile, has clarified that it has no plans to relocate Burundian refugees and will keep its doors open.

In Uganda, about two thirds of Burundian arrivals in the past year are being hosted in Nakivale Refugee Settlement (14,876) in the South-West Region, 21 per cent in the capital Kampala, and the remainder in Kyaka II, Oruchinga and Kisoro settlements.

Most are young women and children, with a disproportionately low number of young men. Work is under way to extend settlement areas at Nakivale and other locations. Access to water continues to be a problem and UNHCR is delivering by truck in Nakivale, which is costly and unsustainable.

As with the other asylum countries, funding is a major problem which is affecting access to education, health care, livelihoods, counselling and more, though Uganda allows people to work and travel.

UNHCR requested US$175.1 million for the Burundi humanitarian response in 2016 and has to date received US$4.7 million, or about 3 per cent. –UNHCR

Joint Communique: 17th Ordinary Summity of the East African Community Heads of State

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“Carine Kaneza on the Burundi crisis” (Youtube-Clip)

The African Union will send 100 human rights monitors and 100 military monitors to Burundi as the tiny nation faces its worst political crisis since a civil war ended a decade ago. Vincent Makori talks to Carine Kaneza a member of the Burundi Women and Girl’s Movement for Peace and Security and a transitional justice practitioner” (TV2 Africa, 2016)

“Why Africa has old leaders and young people?” (BBC News – Youtube-Clip)

Why Africa has old leaders and young people. The recent election victory of Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni has once again raised questions about term limits and democracy in some African countries. However, the Ugandan leader, who is entering his fifth term in office, is not the only one. The issue of presidential terms has caused public protests in Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo and in 2014 led to the ousting of Blaise Compaore, long-time leader of Burkina Faso. BBC Africa Business Report’s Matthew Davies looks at the contrast between Africa’s old leaders and its young population” (BBC News, 04.03.2016).

President Kagame congratulates President Museveni after announcement of his 5th term

Kagame Museveni

Another one in the line of the men congratulating President Museveni after the announcement of his victory recently; President Paul Kagame shows his respect for his old ally. As the other ones who has congratulated him is the Russian Foreign Department, Both President Kiir and V.P. Riek Machar of South Sudan, President Kenyatta of Kenya, President Sheikh Mohamoud Hassan, President Jacob Zuma of South Africa, President Nkruanziza of Burundi, President Obiang of Equatorial Guinea and now the President of Rwanda.

This here is what’s has been said and written:

“In a diplomatic note sent Sunday to Uganda’s Foreign Affairs Ministry, Kagame said Museveni’s victory in the February 18 presidential elections is “certainly a reflection of the trust the Ugandan people have in your ability to lead them forward in their quest for prosperity and socio-economic transformation” (…)”According to officials at Uganda’s Foreign Affairs Ministry in Kampala, Kagame in his message told Museveni that Rwanda wishes him “success in your term of office, and remains ready to strengthen the excellent ties existing between our two brotherly countries” (Muhame, 2016).

This here proves the diplomatic ties between Uganda and Rwanda is still there and close as the faith President Kagame has in the leadership of President Museveni. He is ready to continue the progress as it gives the loyal friendship between them. For him it doesn’t matter if the Ugandan people had another will and wished another man to run the country. Peace.

President Nkurunziza of Burundi congratulates President Museveni

Nkurunziza Congratulate M7