MinBane

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Archive for the tag “Djibouti”

South Sudan Opposition Alliance (SSOA) Press Statement on Dr. Riek Machar attending Peace Talks in Addis Ababa (20.06.2018)

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Somalia: Renewal of the Somaliland Special Agreement (09.06.2018)

IGAD: A Revised Bridging Proposal On the Outstanding Issues Pertaining to Governance and Security Arrangements in the High Level Revitalization Forum of the Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan (12.06.2018)

Joint Communique Issued after Bilateral talks betwen H.E. Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed ‘Farmaajo’, President of the Federal Republic of Somalia and H.E. (Dr.) Abiy Ahmed Ali, Prime Minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia on the Occasion of the Official Visit to Somalia (16.06.2018)

 

SPLM/A-IO – On the Trump Administration’s Proposal of Freezing Assets and Imposing Other Sanctions on South Sudan Leaders (15.06.2018)

South Sudan: SPLM/A-(IO) on the Invitation of Dr. Riek Machar by the Prime Minister of Ethiopia – H.E. Dr. Abiy Ahmed Ali (13.06.2018)

SPLM/A-IO: Press Release – Joint Communique on the Occasion of the State Visit to the Republic of Uganda by His Excellency Dr. Abiy Ahmed Ali, Prime Minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (09.06.2018)

Aid Ironies and Djibouti’s “Invisible Undercitizens” (07.06.2018)

The government of Djibouti had borrowed substantially from the World Bank to create a Center of Excellence facility, intended to address the problem of child malnourishment.

WASHINGTON D.C., United States of America, June 7, 2018 –  This is a guest post by Jim Sanders, a career, now retired, West Africa watcher for various federal agencies. The views expressed below are his personal views and do not reflect those of his former employers.

Returning from an early autumn vacation in Acadia National Park last year, we exited I-95 near Waterville, Maine to grab a Starbucks coffee at a nearby mall. Seeking a second opinion on my theory that the Subaru station-wagon was the state car of Maine, I approached a total stranger who was climbing out of his Toyota Prius. After affirming that, in fact, he had owned one himself, the man identified himself as Dr. David Austin, a local physician. He also mentioned his upcoming tour in Djibouti, as a Doctors Without Borders (Medecins Sans Frontiers, or MSF) physician, and explained that he had previously served in Sudan (Darfur) and Congo.

Having recently returned from the four-month tour with MSF in Djibouti, Dr. Austin was eager to speak about his experiences there. He worked in a tent hospital in the capital, which focused on treating malnourished children. Mortality is particularly high in that segment of the population. (In Djibouti, MSF expected a large refugee influx, but the flow of refugees into Djibouti failed to materialize, and so it developed a program specifically for malnourished children.)

The government of Djibouti had borrowed substantially from the World Bank to create a Center of Excellence facility, intended to address the problem of child malnourishment, but while the structure was built, it did not become operational. MSF, whose mission centers on providing aid in emergencies, eventually began to close down their tent hospital. A handover to another institution never occurred, yet every month, Dr. Austin said, more kids appeared needing treatment. “On paper,” he said, “the government treats malnourished children, but in reality many children do not get treated.”

Yet, as in his other African assignments, Dr. Austin felt buoyed by the people themselves, having previously remarked that, “There is a strong spirit of joyfulness in many Africans that I consider priceless.” Djibouti’s slums are worse than India’s, he explained, where the poor hammer out tin cans and make nice shacks, and sweep the areas around them to keep them clean. In Djibouti, in contrast, the poor live in rag tents, amidst a sea of garbage. “If your child dies, MSF will provide you a ride home, with your dead child,” Austin explained. “I went with one family [to take their deceased child home], driving forever through slums, until we reached a shack in the middle of nowhere.”

But despite their circumstances, the people are “lovely, eager to talk, and full of energy.” “There’s a lot going on,” he noted. Not least, a mini-Arab Spring, which has prompted a heavy-handed government reaction.

South Sudan: The SPLM/SPLA (IO) Position on Sudan’s Foreign Minister’s Visit to Juba (06.06.2018)

United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) strongly condemns attack on peacekeepers in South Sudan’s Unity region (06.06.2018)

The Mission continues to engage with local authorities and to urge the warring parties to stop the fighting and adhere to the Cessation of Hostilities Agreement signed by all parties just over five months ago.

JUBA, South Sudan, June 6, 2018 –  The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) strongly condemns an armed attack that directly targeted its peacekeepers in the country’s Unity region, on the morning of 4 June 2018.

A convoy consisting of peacekeepers and civilians came under fire when it stopped briefly to interact with a civilian in Rubkway, about 20 kilometers north of Leer town. The team was on a short patrol from the Mission’s Leer Temporary Operations Base to Thaker, in Mayendit County.

No one was injured in the incident, and so far, no damage to the vehicles has been identified.

UNMISS strongly condemns this attack against its personnel and calls on all parties to respect the freedom of movement of UN personnel carrying out their mandate, and to cooperate with the peacekeepers as they work to protect civilians; monitor human rights; create a conducive environment for delivery of humanitarian aid, and support efforts to restore peace.

The Leer area has been the scene of heightened insecurity in recent weeks, as humanitarian agencies working in the area continue to report that more people are still fleeing for their lives amid sharp escalation in fighting and attacks on civilians.

UNMISS has boosted its peacekeeping contingent into the area, flying in additional soldiers and airlifting in armoured personnel carriers to assist with patrolling in affected villages to better protect civilians.

The Mission continues to engage with local authorities and to urge the warring parties to stop the fighting and adhere to the Cessation of Hostilities Agreement signed by all parties just over five months ago.

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