MinBane

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Archive for the tag “Capital”

Kanjo Kingdom of Nairobi; This is how the County Officials harrass small scale traders in Kenya (Youtube-Clip)

“County Police in Nairobi taking bribes corruption at it best” (Felo Wizzy, 2016)

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Barclays Bank Uganda Limited’s Operations Not Affected By Impending Shareholding Decisions (01.03.2016)

Barclays Uganda

There have been some local, regional, and international media reports regarding a decision by Barclays Bank Plc to reduce its shareholding in Barclays Africa Group Ltd which involves twelve (12) African countries including Uganda. Barclays Bank Uganda Ltd. has since held two press conferences to clarify the details of these new developments.

Further to the clarifications offered by Barclays Bank, I wish to reassure the Ugandan public that the Barclays Bank Plc announcement does not affect the operations of Barclays Bank Uganda in any way and there will be no interruption to the services Barclays Bank Uganda Ltd extends to its customers.

The regulatory framework in Uganda ensures that any transitions of this nature are orderly and do not affect the soundness and stability of the financial sector as well as provision of financial services to customers.

Please note the following salient points

1. Commercial Banks in Uganda are incorporated locally and function as independent subsidiaries and not as branches. As such, Barclays Bank Uganda Limited is an independent subsidiary of the Barclays Bank Africa Group (in which Barclays Bank Plc owns 62.3% ) and is fully incorporated and registered in Uganda. Being a subsidiary, Barclays Bank Uganda has its own capital base, Management and an autonomous Board of Directors. This insulates the subsidiary from issues affecting the parent entity.

2. The Financial Institutions Act 2004 as amended by the Financial Institutions Amendment Act 2015 and associated regulations provides for a clear procedure for the disposal of Bank of Uganda supervised financial institutions’ shares. If the shareholders of any bank choose to dispose off their shares, the Bank of Uganda will undertake the necessary process of vetting new shareholders to ensure they are fit and proper to run a financial institution in Uganda.

3. Barclays Bank Uganda Limited remains solvent and liquid. It is well capitalised with a capital adequacy ratio well above the statutory minimum of 8.0 percent. The banking sector in Uganda as a whole has a strong asset and capital base with a capital adequacy ratio of 18.8 percent, as well as a relatively low level of nonperforming loans of about 5.3 percent as at December 2015.

I therefore wish to assure the Ugandan public and customers of Barclays Bank Uganda Ltd. in particular that there is no cause for concern arising from the media announcements by Barclays Bank Plc. Customers should therefore continue with their normal banking transactions without any anxiety. The Bank of Uganda is committed to prudent supervision and regulation of financial institutions in order to ensure the stability and soundness of the financial sector, as well as the safety of customers’ deposits.

Please direct any further enquiries to the Director Communications on calupo@bou.or.ug
Justine Bagyenda
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SUPERVISION
BANK OF UGANDA

Bank of Uganda’s Monetary Policy Statement for October 2015 (20.10.2015)

BOU MPS OCT P1BOU MPS OCT P2

Uganda – 53rd Independence Day Message from Yoweri K. Museveni, Dr. Kizza Besigye and Amama Mbabazi!

YKM 53 Ann Message

(YKM will hold a speech later today on Kololo Airstrip. Sure it will give even more “insights”)

But before that, enjoy the message from the FDC Flag-bearer!

Dr. Kizza Besigye Independence day message:

Independence Is not about just changing flag. In this county, Ugandans do not control the means of production. production is governed by two cardinal factors.
One land
We have Ugandans who are completely landless, they have no rights to land. They don’t have control over their natural resources including the most basic one which is water. The only natural resource they control is air.

Ugandans do not control the capital assets and they don’t control their labor. They are toiling for free. Govt has failed to put in place policies. Those who are lucky are exploited. They are modern slaves.
They don’t have control of technology.

The majority of Ugandans have no say in the trade and exchange policies. Wat ever little they make is taken for less.
We have no control over our taxes and expenditures.
We have a citizenry who are powerless after more than a quarter of a century.

The unprecedented poverty and unemployment.
These conditions will not change until the people of Ugandan acquire their power..

As we mark the 54th independence, Ugandans must regain their power. This is the most fundamental tasks of our people.

A powerless Citzen has no business in an election. Ugandans are still defrenchised as when they didn’t have votes.
You have a piece of paper without power.

I would like to invite our fellow citizen to rethink their role and how they determine it in the next election.
We are refuges in our country.

To gain power we must do three things.
We must realize that we don’t have power and without it, nothing will change.
We must regain our confidence as Citizens that this is our country.
With a confident citize we must get power the rest is easy.
We must stand up and say no. We are not going to be dominated again.
That unity is a unity of purpose. We need to get together inorder to regain our power. Not to get together to comply with our oppressor.
Some people want us together to comply with our oppressor.
We must defy our oppressor.
Those who want to organise to defy the oppressor to regain our power, am going to join them all the way.
Those who want to comply with the oppressor, I won’t be on their side.

Am happy on the Eve of Independence, am excited about the young people who are setting the agenda.
Am excited about the young people in MUK who are saying NO to the 100% tuition payment. We shall set the agenda.
The young people will lead the way to our liberation.
Am joining the 54th year of independent with hope. Am only disappointed where everybody is up for sale.
When I was moving around the country, poor Ugandans were giving me money to liberate our country.
We shall use our meager resources to liberate our country.
God Bless You.

(And the last Amama Mbabazi and the TDA:)

Amama 53rd

Gen. Muhammade Buhari – First Speech after Military Coup, 31 December, 1983 and General Ibrahim Babangida – Speech on 27. August 1985 after overthrowing Gen. M. Buhari

Buhari

General Muhammadu Buhari’s first speech after the Coup d’etat 31. December 1983:

In pursuance of the primary objective of saving our great nation from total collapse, I, Major-General Muhammadu Buhari of the Nigerian army have, after due consultation amongst the services of the armed forces, been formally invested with the authority of the Head of the Federal Military Government and the Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. It is with humility and a deep sense of responsibility that I accept this challenge and call to national duty.

As you must have heard in the previous announcement, the constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (1979) has been suspended, except those sections of it which are exempted in the constitution. The change became necessary in order to put an end to the serious economic predicament and the crisis of confidence now afflicting our nation. Consequently, the Nigerian armed forces have constituted themselves into a Federal Military Government comprising of a Supreme Military Council, a National Council of States, a Federal Executive Council at the centre and State Executive Councils to be presided over by military governors in each of the states of the federation. Members of these councils will be announced soon. The last Federal Military Government drew up a programme with the aim of handing over political power to the civilians in 1979. This programme as you all know, was implemented to the letter. The 1979 constitution was promulgated.

However, little did the military realise that the political leadership of the second republic will circumvent most of the checks and balances in the constitution and bring the present state of general insecurity. The premium on political power became so exceedingly high that political contestants regarded victory at elections as a matter of life and death struggle and were determined to capture or retain power by all means. It is true that there is a worldwide economic recession.

However, in the case of Nigeria, its impact was aggravated by mismanagement. We believe the appropriate government agencies have good advice but the leadership disregarded their advice. The situation could have been avoided if the legislators were alive to their constitutional responsibilities; Instead, the legislators were preoccupied with determining their salary scales, fringe benefit and unnecessary foreign travels, et al, which took no account of the state of the economy and the welfare of the people they represented.

As a result of our inability to cultivate financial discipline and prudent management of the economy, we have come to depend largely on internal and external borrowing to execute government projects with attendant domestic pressure and soaring external debts, thus aggravating the propensity of the outgoing civilian administration to mismanaged our financial resources. Nigeria was already condemned perpetually with the twin problem of heavy budget deficits and weak balance of payments position, with the prospect of building a virile and viable economy.
The last general election was anything but free and fair. The only political parties that could complain of election rigging are those parties that lacked the resources to rig. There is ample evidence that rigging and thuggery were relative to the resources available to the parties. This conclusively proved to us that the parties have not developed confidence in the presidential system of government on which the nation invested so much material and human resources. While corruption and indiscipline have been associated with our state of under-development, these two evils in our body politics have attained unprecedented height in the past few years. The corrupt, inept and insensitive leadership in the last four years has been the source of immorality and impropriety in our society.

Since what happens in any society is largely a reflection of the leadership of that society, we deplore corruption in all its facets. This government will not tolerate kick-backs, inflation of contracts and over-invoicing of imports etc. Nor will it condone forgery, fraud, embezzlement, misuse and abuse of office and illegal dealings in foreign exchange and smuggling. Arson has been used to cover up fraudulent acts in public institutions. I am referring to the fire incidents that gutted the P&T buildings in Lagos, the Anambra State Broadcasting Corporation, the Republic Building at Marina, the Federal Ministry of Education, the Federal Capital Development Authority Accounts at Abuja and the NET Building. Most of these fire incidents occurred at a time when Nigerians were being apprehensive of the frequency of fraud scandals and the government incapacity to deal with them. Corruption has become so pervasive and intractable that a whole ministry has been created to stem it.

Fellow Nigerians, this indeed is the moment of truth. My colleagues and I – the Supreme Military Council, must be frank enough to acknowledge the fact that at the moment, an accurate picture of the financial position is yet to be determined. We have no doubt that the situation is bad enough. In spite of all this, every effort will be made to ensure that the difficult and degrading conditions under which we are living are eliminated. Let no one however be deceived that workers who have not received their salaries in the past eight or so months will receive such salaries within today or tomorrow or that hospitals which have been without drugs for months will be provided with enough immediately. We are determined that with the help of God we shall do our best to settle genuine payments to which government is committed, including backlog of workers’ salaries after scrutiny.

We are confident and we assure you that even in the face of the global recession, and the seemingly gloomy financial future, given prudent management of Nigeria’s existing financial resources and our determination to substantially reduce and eventually nail down rises in budgetary deficits and weak balance of payments position. The Federal Military Government will reappraise policies with a view to paying greater attention to the following areas: The economy will be given a new impetus and better sense of direction. Corrupt officials and their agents will be brought to book.

In view of the drought that affected most parts of the country, the federal government will, with the available resources, import food stuffs to supplement the shortfalls suffered in the last harvest. Our foreign policy will both be dynamic and realistic. Africa will of course continue to be the centre piece of our foreign policy. The morale and combat readiness of the armed forces will be given high priority. Officers and men with high personal and professional integrity will have nothing to fear.
The Chief Justice of Nigeria and all other holders of judiciary appointments within the federation can continue in their appointments and the judiciary shall continue to function under existing laws subject to such exceptions as may be decreed from time to time by the Federal Military Government. All holders of appointments in the civil service, the police and the National Security Organisation shall continue to exercise their functions in the normal way subject to changes that may be introduced by the Federal Military Government.
All those chairmen and members of statutory corporations, parastatals and other executive departments are hereby relieved of their appointments with immediate effect.

The Federal Military Government will maintain and strengthen existing diplomatic relations with other states and with international organisations and institutions such as the Organisation of African Unity, the United Nations and its organs, Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries, ECOWAS and the Commonwealth etc. The Federal Military Government will honour and respect all treaties and obligations entered into by the previous government and we hope that such nations and bodies will reciprocate this gesture by respecting our country’s territorial integrity and sovereignty.

Fellow Nigerians, finally, we have dutifully intervened to save this nation from imminent collapse. We therefore expect all Nigerians, including those who participated directly or indirectly in bringing the nation to this present predicament, to cooperate with us. This generation of Nigerians, and indeed future generations, have no country other than Nigeria. We shall remain here and salvage it together.May God bless us all. Good morning.

Babangida-MILLITARY-DICTATOR

The Coup d’etat speech from Ibrahim Babangida: 

This was in 27. August 1985:

Fellow Nigerians,
When in December 1983, the former military leadership, headed by Major-General Muhammadu Buhari, assumed the reins of government, its accession was heralded in the history of this country. With the nation at the mercy of political misdirection and on the brink of economic collapse, a new sense of hope was created in the minds of every Nigerian.

Since January 1984, however, we have witnessed a systematic denigration of that hope. It was stated then that mismanagement of political leadership and a general deterioration in the standard of living, which had subjected the common man to intolerable suffering, were the reasons for the intervention.

Nigerians have since then been under a regime that continued with those trends. Events today indicate that most of the reasons which justified the military takeover of government from the civilians still persist.

The initial objectives were betrayed and fundamental changes do not appear on the horizon. Because the present state of uncertainty, suppression and stagnation resulted from the perpetration of a small group, the Nigerian Armed Forces could not as a part of that government be unfairly committed to take responsibility for failure. Our dedication to the cause of ensuring that our nation remains a united entity worthy of respect and capable of functioning as a viable and credible part of the international community dictated the need to arrest the situation.

Let me at this point attempt to make you understand the premise upon which it became necessary to change the leadership. The principles of discussions, consultation and co-operation which should have guided decision-making process of the Supreme Military Council and the Federal Executive Council were disregarded soon after the government settled down in 1984. Where some of us thought it appropriate to give a little more time, anticipating a conducive atmosphere that would develop, in which affairs of state could be attended to with greater sense of responsibility, it became increasingly clear that such expectations could not be fulfilled.

Regrettably, it turned out that Major-General Muhammadu Buhari was too rigid and uncompromising in his attitudes to issues of national significance. Efforts to make him understand that a diverse polity like Nigeria required recognition and appreciation of differences in both cultural and individual perceptions, only served to aggravate these attitudes.

Major-General Tunde Idiagbon was similarly inclined in that respect. As Chief of Staff, Supreme Headquarters, he failed to exhibit the appropriate disposition demanded by his position. He arrogated to himself absolute knowledge of problems and solutions, and acted in accordance with what was convenient to him, using the machinery of government as his tool.

A combination of these characteristics in the two most important persons holding the nation’s vital offices became impossible to content with. The situation was made worse by a number of other government functionaries and organisations, chief among which is the Nigerian Security Organisation (NSO). In fact, this body will be overhauled and re-organized.

And so it came to be that the same government which received the tumultuous welcome now became alienated from the people. To prevent a complete erosion of our given mandate therefore, we had to act so that hope may be rebuilt.

Let me now address your attention to the major issues that confront us, so that we may, as one people, chart a future direction for our dear country. We do not pretend to have all the answers to the questions which our present problems have put before our nation. We have come with the strongest determination to create an atmosphere in which positive efforts shall be given the necessary support for lasting solutions.

For matters of the moment which require immediate resolutions, we intend to pursue a determined programme of action. Major issues falling into this category have been identified and decisions taken on what should be done.

Firstly, the issue of political detainees or convicts of special military tribunals. The history of our nation had never recorded the degree of indiscipline and corruption as in the period between October 1979 and December 1983.

While this government recognises the bitterness created by the irresponsible excesses of the politicians, we consider it unfortunate that methods of such nature as to cause more bitterness were applied to deal with past misdeeds. We must never allow ourselves to lose our sense of natural justice. The innocent cannot suffer the crimes of the guilty. The guilty should be punished only as a lesson for the future. In line with this government’s intention to uphold fundamental human rights, the issue of detainees will be looked into with despatch.

As we do not intend to lead a country where individuals are under the fear of expressing themselves, the Public Officers Protection Against False Accusation Decree 4 of 1984 is hereby repealed. And finally, those who have been in detention under this decree are hereby unconditionally released. The responsibility of the media to disseminate information shall be exercised without undue hindrance. In that process, those responsible are expected to be forthright and to have the nation’s interest as their primary consideration.

The issue of decrees has generated a lot of controversies. It is the intention of this government to review all other decrees.

The last twenty months have not witnessed any significant changes in the national economy. Contrary to expectations, we have so far been subjected to a steady deterioration in the general standard of living; and intolerable suffering by the ordinary Nigerians have risen higher, scarcity of commodities has increased, hospitals still remain mere consulting clinics, while educational institutions are on the brink of decay. Unemployment has stretched to critical dimensions.

Due to the stalemate, which arose in negotiation with the International Monetary Fund, the former government embarked on a series of counter-trade agreements. Under the counter-trade agreements, Nigerians were forced to buy goods and commodities at higher prices than obtained in the international market. The government intends to review the whole issue of counter-trade.

A lot has been said and heard about our position with the International Monetary Fund. Although we formally applied to the fund in April 1983, no progress has as yet been made in the negotiation and a stalemate has existed for the last two years.

We shall break the deadlock that frustrated the negotiations with a view to evaluating more objectively both the negative and positive implications of reaching a mutual agreement with the Fund. At all times in the course of discussions, our representatives will be guided by the feelings and aspirations of the Nigerian people.

It is the view of this government that austerity without structural adjustment is not the solution to our economic predicament. The present situation whereby 44 per cent of our revenue earning is utilised to service debts is not realistic. To protect the danger this poses to the poor and the needy in our society, steps will be taken to ensure comprehensive strategy of economic reforms.

The crux of our economic problems has been identified to centre around four fundamental issues:
1. A decrease of our domestic production, while our population continues to increase.
2. Dependence on import for both consumer goods and raw materials for our industries.
3. A grossly unequal gap between the rich and the poor.
4. The large role played by the public sector in economic activity with hardly any concrete results to justify such a role.

These are the problems we must confront.

ON FOREIGN POLICY:
Nigeria’s foreign policy in the last 20 months has been characterised by inconsistency and incoherence. It has lacked the clarity to make us know where we stood on matters of international concern to enable other countries relate to us with seriousness. Our role as Africa’s spokesman has diminished because we have been unable to maintain the respect of African countries.

The ousted military government conducted our external relations by a policy of retaliatory reactions. Nigeria became a country that has reacted to given situations, rather than taking the initiative as it should and always been done. More so, vengeful considerations must not be the basis of our diplomacy. African problems and their solutions should constitute the premise of our foreign policy.

The realisation of the Organisation of African Unity of the Lagos Plan of Action for self-sufficiency and constructive co-operation in Africa shall be our primary pursuit.

The Economic Community of West African States must be reborn with the view to achieving the objective of regional integration. The problems of drought-stricken areas of Africa will be given more attention and sympathy, and our best efforts will be made to assist in their rehabilitation within the limits of our resources. Our membership of the United Nations Organisation will be made more practical and meaningful. The call for a new International Economic Order which lost its momentum in the face of the debt crisis will be made once again.

Nigeria hereby makes a renewed request to the Non-Aligned Movement to regroup and reinvigorate its determination to restructure the global economic system, while we appeal to the industrialized nations to positively consider the debt plight of the developing countries and assist in dealing with the dangers that face us. We shall remain members of the various multilateral institutions and inter-governmental organisations which we belong to and do what must be done to enhance the membership and participation within them.

Fellow Nigerians, this country has had since independence a history mixed with turbulence and fortune. We have witnessed our rise to greatness, followed with a decline to the state of a bewildered nation. Our human potentials have been neglected, our natural resources put to waste. A phenomenon of constant insecurity and overbearing uncertainty has become characteristic of our national existence.

My colleagues and I are determined to change the course of history. This government is determined to unite this country. We shall not allow anything to obstruct us. We recognise that a government, be it civilian or military, needs the consent of the people to govern if it is to reach its objective. We do not intend to rule by force. At the same time, we should not be expected to submit to unreasonable demands. Fundamental rights and civil liberties will be respected, but their exercise must not degenerate into irrational expression nor border on subversion.

The War Against Indiscipline will continue, but this time, in the minds and conduct of Nigerians, and not by way of symbolism or money-spending campaigns.

This government, on its part, will ensure that the leadership exhibits proper example. Criticisms of actions and decisions taken by us will be given necessary attention and where necessary changes made in accordance with what is expected of us.

Let me reiterate what we said in 1984: This generation of Nigerians and indeed future generations have no other country but Nigeria. We must all stay and salvage it together. This time it shall be pursued with deeper commitment and genuine sincerity.

There is a lot of work to be done by every single Nigerian. Let us all dedicate ourselves to the cause of building a strong, united and viable nation for the sake of our own lives and the benefits of posterity.

Finally, I wish to commend the members of the Armed Forces and the Nigeria Police for their mature conduct during the change.

I thank you all for your co-operation and understanding.

God bless Nigeria.

Press Statement by FAWU on the Campaign for Privatization-by-a-back Door (16.1.2015)

16 January 2015

The Food and Allied Workers Union (FAWU) notes with disgust, the suggestions and proposals; made by some representatives of Big Business and Capital, such as Barclays Bank, and by some political parties, such as the Democratic Alliance (DA); for our Government to consider embarking on Privatization of State-owned Enterprises, at the back of ESKOM’s electricity delivery challenges as a justification.

We wish to reject such suggestions and proposals with contempt they deserve and regard those as nothing but blackmailing program to the Government to privatize those critical assets to the highest or even lowest bidder from the ranks of private sector.

We call on our Government to employ a professionally-based yet development-mandate program to get ESKOM and, certainly several more of the State-owned Enterprises (SOEs), back into shape for a continued role as an enabler and catalyst for economic development and delivery of basic needs to the people.

Therefore, FAWU will not accept any attempt, even an inch of such a move, to privatise those SOEs and doing so will be regarded as a sell-out policy offensive against the clarion call of a radical phase of the transition and to the agenda of a radical socio-economic transformation in eradicating poverty, substantially reducing inequalities and creating full employment with decent jobs.

If anything, FAWU will mobilize for a, or be part of any, rolling mass action that is likely to unfold from the working class formations and communities.

The R86 billion could easily be achieved through a re-introduction of a progressive taxation system and the increased taxes to the rich than through sale of shares in companies owned by the State.

We hope our government will ignore such calls and, instead, embark on fiscal expansionism by raising taxes for the rich individuals and to the corporates so as to mobilise resources needed to support SOEs, to roll-out both social and economic infrastructure and to deliver basic services to and/or meet basic needs of the people.

For more information feel free to contact the FAWU General Secretary, Katishi Masemola at 082 467 2509

Issued by
KATISHI MASEMOLA
FAWU General Secretary

– See more at: http://www.cosatu.org.za/show.php?ID=9915#sthash.5fyskRXf.dpuf

Putin flexing with sanctions on the Western-hemisphere and their reactions to it.

Well, we knew it was coming. We all did who have followed recent events. Putin is a big-man in his own way. He leading his country and does it in his style and fashion. It is understandable that the western-hemisphere is reacting to. They see the action of the Kremlin and Russians as stepping a bit too far, the same does the Russians who seem to think the European involvement in Ukraine. Well, to be honest I am not going to grind directly on the matters of Donetsk, Crimea or separatist or Russian involvement in certain districts of Ukraine. This piece will be about the certain new press releases and their press statements from nations and boards on the matter of new Russian sanctions as counter to the ones set by the EU and Western nations.

Russian Press release on the 6th August:

“Vladimir Putin signed Executive Order On Special Economic Measures to Protect the Russian Federation’s Security” (…)”Russian state bodies of power, federal authorities, local self-government bodies, legal entities established in accordance with Russian law, and physical individuals under Russian jurisdiction shall, in carrying out their activities, respect for a duration of one year following this Executive Order’s entry into force a ban or restriction on foreign economic operations involving the import to Russia of particular kinds of agricultural produce, raw materials and foodstuffs originating in countries that have decided to impose economic sanctions on Russian legal entities and/or physical individuals, or have joined such decisions”(…)” The Russian Federation Government has been given instructions accordingly. In particular, the Government has been instructed to take measures to ensure balanced goods markets and prevent accelerating price rises for agricultural products and foodstuffs; to organise together with regional authorities timely monitoring of goods markets; and act together with associations of goods producers, retailers and organisations to take measures to increase supply of domestic goods” (Kremlin, 2014).

“The Executive Order takes effect upon its signing” (Kremlin, 2014).

Bernama reports that Prime Minister Dmity Medvedev said at a cabinet meeting:

“The current situation as it is, the Russian government is considering a number of retaliatory steps” (…)”I will mention some of them, but that does not mean that they will be introduced at once. The measures include a ban on transit flights by European and US air carriers to Southeast Asia, to the Asia-Pacific Region” (Bernama, 2014)

German response to the sanctions from Russia:

The Federal German government gave its statement. This through deputy government spokesman Christiane Wirtz, here is their statement:

“that the massive presence of troops at the border is not helping de-escalate the situation” (…)”The German government would thus naturally welcome a withdrawal of the Russian troops from the border in this area” (…)”to stabilise and further de-escalate the situation” (…)”The presence of troops in the area is not a step towards making the situation more peaceful” (…)”particularly help bring about the called for de-escalation,” (…)”to do nothing that could further destabilise the situation in Ukraine” (…)”We demand the greatest possible transparency” (…)”The UNHCR does not have any first-hand figures for the number of refugees that have left Ukraine for Russia” (…)”currently no legal basis” (Bundesregierung, 2014).

The EU measures:

  • Imposing an arms embargo
  • Russian state-controlled banks will have it more difficult to get funds in the EU capitol market.
  • Export of Hi-Tech goods and oil equipment stopped.
  • Export of Duel use goods which is used by the Russian Army is stopped.

This is after the second range of sanctions made by the EU on the 28th July from the European Commission.

(Bundesregierung, 2014)

Writz comments on the sanctions:

“that the European Commission does offer assistance for special cases and special situations” (…)”It should surprise nobody that sanctions come at a price – especially those who have for months been declaring that harsh sanctions are a test of the credibility of European politics. The German government is in touch with the German private sector, I have been in contact with businesses since March, so as to keep the consequences to a calculable level at least. It should also be possible to adapt and scale back sanctions if political progress is made in efforts to resolve the conflict”. Frank-Walter Steinmeier comments on the matter as well: “That is why, in spite of all difficulties, we are keeping channels to Russia open” (…)” Experience shows that whoever increases political pressure to convince the other side to negotiate, must himself also be willing to negotiate” (Bundesregierung, 2014).

It needed only less than 24 hours before the world is answering this. The first one I will show is the EU.

Statement by the EU Commission spokesman on the 7th August:

“The European Union regrets the announcement by the Russian Federation of measures which will target imports of food and agricultural products. This announcement is clearly politically motivated. The Commission will assess the measures in question as soon as we have more information as to their full content and extent. We underline that the European Union’s restrictive measures are directly linked with the illegal annexation of Crimea and destabilisation of Ukraine. The European Union remains committed to de-escalating the situation in Ukraine. All should join in this effort. Following full assessment by the Commission of the Russian Federation’s measures, we reserve the right to take action as appropriate” (EU, 2014).

This is not the only appropriate comment have been sent out after the Russians decided to retaliate the measures made by the west. At this point the UK Government had to give a response.

The response comes from the United Kingdom HMG with the Honor Phillip Hammond MP of Department of Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and the Honor of David Lidington MP of Business, Innovation and Skills. Here is what they say:

“Russia has no grounds to impose sanctions and should use its influence with violent Russian-backed separatists to stop destabilising Ukraine” (…)”We have been pushing for a strong and determined international response to Russia’s unacceptable behaviour in Ukraine. We have been clear that we are prepared to play our part and that there will be costs, but this does not diminish our commitment” (…)”Instead of retaliating, Russia should be using its influence with the violent Russian-backed separatists to stop destabilising Ukraine” (…)”We are still considering the impacts of the ban but we do not expect it to have a significant overall effect on our agricultural industry – the affected agricultural exports to Russia account for some 0.2% of our food, feed and drink total agricultural exports” (…)” We will continue to work closely with trade associations and industry to help them monitor the impact of this ban on their business” (UK,2014).

Norwegian counter to the Russians:

Norwegian Foreign minister Børge Brende has also addressed the matter. Børge Brende is saying: “That Russians import embargo is unreasonable. That the Russian goes to this measures show how important that we as allies and partners react to the Russian destabilization of Ukraine. I am agreeing with the EU and the way portray their actions as a political motivated” (…)”We will take the Russian measures seriously, but it’s still early to see the outcome for the Norwegian businesses. We are going through the measures with EU and other who have been targeted. With them are we trying to find the best solution to deal with this” (…)”instead of reduction of the conflict in eastern-Ukraine, instead Russians to uphold it and escalating it. There going significant numbers of arms across the boarders from Russia to Ukraine. It is essential that the Russians will be met with clear and sound reaction from the international community. And out of the regarding the Norwegian state in foreign and security political, we have to stand by our partners and allies” (Regjeringen, 2014).

Lithuanian response to Russia on the 7th August:

President Dalia Grybauskaitė says: “Such reaction from Russia was predictable. But the impact on our economy will not be significant. Lithuania has already gained much experience during the economic blockade in the first years of independence, the crisis, and the last-year sanctions on our carriers and manufacturers of dairy products. Our business already knows how to counter the hostile challenges of our big neighbor. It is able to find new markets and hedge against risks. This makes us even more flexible and strong” (Lithuania, 2014).

Latvian response to the Russia sanctions:  

In another Baltic state Latvia, Prime Minister Aimdota Straujuma has called in for a emergency meeting on the Russian sanctions. The date hasn’t been set yet, but the report says it’s likely to be on Monday the 11th of August. At the meeting they will evaluate and asses the sanction and calculate the result and change it could have on the economy of Latvia (Leta, 2014).

The Finnish response to the Russian sanctions: 

In Finland Prime Minister Alexander Stubb has commented on the matter: “It was to be expected that Russia would respond to the sanctions issued by the EU. The impact of the Russian sanctions on the Finnish economy and Finnish businesses must be carefully examined before the government budget session. I will give a Prime Minister’s announcement to Parliament as soon as it convenes. The measures will affect a number of other EU countries and the Russians themselves, too” (…)”Finland will continue diplomatic efforts to resolve the crisis both with its EU partners and through bilateral means”. The Finnish MP of Agriculture and Forestry Petteri Orpo is saying: “Russia is our food industry’s main export area. Dairy products account for about 87 per cent of our exports to Russia as regards the products on the list of banned imports. We will hold a meeting today at the ministry to discuss measures to minimise the effects of the Russian import ban and to open new export markets”. Lenita Toivakka the MP of European Affairs and Foreign trade says: “I am very concerned about the effects of the Russian retaliatory sanctions on individual companies. I will personally visit the companies that are hit the hardest by the measures” (Finnish, 2014)

After thought:

We can see and I am sure if I did more digging, there would end up more rabbit out of the hat. Because all the ones that are hit by the sanctions would response to it and make sense of it. Therefore we see now that all this governments’ officials and MPs and spokesmen are telling how it is in their area and how they see the whole conflict between Russia and Ukraine. We could dedicate ourselves to see into the difference between and glean the various contexts and how the boarder countries are reacting compared to those who are further away from Moscow. Still, the tone is subtle, and honest. Also, even some seem heartbroken and disgusted by the flexing from Putin. The EU Commission, German Federation, Norway, Lithuania, Latvia, Finnish and UK, I have complied today. I hope you have seen it and gotten something out of it.

Links:

Bernama – ‘Russia Working On Measures To Close Its Airspace To Asia, Pacific-bound Flights’ (07.08.2014) Link: http://www.bernama.com/bernama/v7/wn/newsworld.php?id=1058640

 

Bundesregierung (Federal German Government) – ‘Russia must withdraw troops’ (06.08.2014) Link: http://www.bundesregierung.de/Content/EN/Artikel/2014/08_en/2014-08-06-ukraine-eu-sanktionen_en.html

 

Kremlin – ‘Executive Order on special economic measures to protect Russia’s security’ (06.08.2014) Link: http://eng.kremlin.ru/acts/22780

 

Leta – ‘Emergency government meeting called in connection with Russia sanctions’ (07.08.2014) Link: http://www.leta.lv/eng/home/important/CFEA7FFD-D875-4B81-89E4-C4D173021D14/

 

Lithuania – ‘Kremlin sanctions will hit Russian people’ (07.08.2014) Link: http://www.president.lt/en/press_center/press_releases/kremlin_sanctions_will_hit_russian_people.html

 

Finnish – ‘Government to assess effects of retaliatory sanctions’ (07.08.2014) Link: http://valtioneuvosto.fi/ajankohtaista/tiedotteet/tiedote/en.jsp?toid=2213&c=0&moid=2217&oid=422109

 

Regjeringen – ‘Brende: – Beklager russisk importforbud’ (07.08.14) Link: http://www.regjeringen.no/nb/dep/ud/pressesenter/pressemeldinger/2014/Brende—Beklager-russisk-importforbud.html?id=765590

 

EU – ‘Statement by Commission spokesman on the announcement of measures by the Russian Federation’ (07.08.2014) Link: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_STATEMENT-14-249_en.htm?locale=en

 

UK – ‘HMG reaction to Russian sanctions’ (07.08.2014) Link: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/hmg-reaction-to-russian-sanctions

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