DSG/SM/836-SC/11735-PBC/103: Addressing Security Council, Deputy Secretary-General Calls upon Solid Commitment from All Sides to Fulfil ‘Original Vision’ for Peacekeeping Structures

14 JANUARY 2015

Following are UN Deputy Secretary-General’s Jan Eliasson’s remarks to the Security Council on post-conflict peacebuilding, in New York today:

Thank you for giving me this opportunity to brief the Council on the Secretary-General’s report on Peacebuilding in the Aftermath of Conflict.

This report reminds us that peacebuilding is at the core of the United Nations’ aims and ambitions.  The challenges and responses described in the report will directly affect the future of individuals, communities and societies and their chances of living in peace.

I would like to highlight five key features of the report.

First, peacebuilding is most effective when political, security and development actors support a common, comprehensive and clear strategy for consolidating peace.

We have seen examples of this in Guinea and Burundi.

In Guinea, the United Nations country team supported an inter-party agreement on parliamentary elections that was facilitated by the then-SRSG [Special Representative of the Secretary-General] for West Africa, Said Djinnit.  The team held public meetings with local political leaders and helped train election monitors.

In Burundi, the Peacebuilding Commission and the country team supported the efforts of the UN Office in pursuit of a more inclusive political environment.  They did this by facilitating broad consultations with political parties and civil society.  This led to the adoption of a new electoral code and a code of conduct for the upcoming elections.

Second, strong and well-functioning institutions that are central to peacebuilding must be based on effective and inclusive political agreements.

Such agreements provide legitimacy and support for institutional development and reform.  Without inclusive agreements, political divisions may persist and control of the State may indeed remain contested.  Under such circumstances, nationally led peacebuilding strategies have a limited potential.  Let’s admit that we have seen this in South Sudan, where extensive investments in institution-building were lost when weak and unstable political agreements between different factions resulted in a tragic relapse of conflict.

Third, peacebuilding requires sustained international political, technical and financial support.

Regretfully, we are seeing such gaps in several places, particularly where the establishment of basic Government functions and the provision of social services are required to sustain peace.

The Peacebuilding Fund can partially address the financial gaps in the short term.  But, it remains problematic to ensure the necessary larger-scale and longer-term assistance and support.

I encourage the Peacebuilding Commission to continue its efforts to mobilize the support of Member States for the UN’s missions and mandates.  Groups of Friends and Contact Groups can play an important role.  Also, compacts between post-conflict States and key international partners can align international support with national priorities — as they did in Sierra Leone and Somalia.

Fourth, regional actors and neighbouring countries, working together with the United Nations, can play a critical role in creating an environment conducive to sustainable peace.

The Peacebuilding Commission can help support such efforts, as it has done recently in the Central African Republic and Guinea-Bissau, by convening meetings with regional organizations, neighbouring States and international partners.

This underlines how conflicts in today’s world more and more take on a regional dimension, which I am sure you in the Council have noted in your deliberations on so many issues.  This regional dimension, in my view, should be better reflected in how we in the future deal generally with both conflict resolution and post-conflict peacebuilding.

Fifthly, and lastly, at this part of my presentation — promoting inclusion means that we must ensure women’s equal participation in post-conflict political and development processes.

The Secretary-General’s report details innovative approaches from Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kyrgyzstan and Liberia, including an initiative in Guinea called the Women’s Situation Room.  This provided support to a network of local women’s organizations, enabling women to play a crucial role as election monitors.  It also facilitated inter-party trust and strengthened women’s political participation.  We need more initiatives like this, and I particularly would like to say that this could be very valuable this year when we mark the 20 years after the important Beijing conference.

I would on this occasion like to present the Council with some reflections and thoughts on the important review of the United Nations peacebuilding architecture that was launched by the General Assembly and the Security Council last month.

It was my privilege, as President of the General Assembly 10 years ago, to be part of the creation of the peacebuilding structures — the Peacebuilding Commission, the Peacebuilding Fund and the Peacebuilding Support Office.  You may recall that this work was in response to the troubling phenomenon at the time of frequent relapses into conflict.

Since then, we can see that peacebuilding efforts are more necessary than ever.  In the recent past, the Central African Republic and South Sudan have tragically fallen back into conflict.

The three Ebola-affected countries, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, are all on the Peacebuilding Commission’s agenda.  In addition to the large and tragic loss of life, the epidemic has also had a dramatic impact on social cohesion and State institutions.  As the Peacebuilding Commission noted in its early meetings on the epidemic, there is a need for comprehensive support that will ensure the resilience of State institutions and of course rapid recovery.

The United Nations’ involvement in peacebuilding has evolved considerably since 2005, with broader mandates and more actors, working in ever more difficult environments.  Our peacekeepers and special political missions are often in these situations called upon to support inclusive political processes and to build effective rule of law and security institutions, together with UN agencies, funds and programmes.

The Peacebuilding Commission was intended to be a diverse, flexible and dynamic political forum, which would focus sustained international attention on the challenges for countries at risk of relapse into violence.  Although the Commission has made some important progress, many now agree that its structure and working methods need review, improvement and adaptation to a rapidly changing environment.  Here, I would like to commend the efforts of the Permanent Representative of Brazil, Antonio [de Aguiar] Patriota, who has been Chair of the Peacebuilding Commission and set the direction in a very positive way, as also the new Head of the Peacebuilding Support office, Oscar Fernandez-Taranco, who is behind me, and his predecessor.  So, we are on the right track and I think we need to go with an open mind into this work.

We need a forum that can act quickly to mobilize the collective support of Member States for the UN’s mandates and missions.  We also need to consider the circumstances in which the Peacebuilding Commission can be particularly useful.  A more flexible, more dynamic and strategically oriented Commission could be more relevant to a broader range of situations in today’s world.

These and other ideas are included in the UN system’s input to the review.  I hope you will give them your serious consideration.  The UN system is committed to increase its support to and engagement with a dynamic, flexible and focused Peacebuilding Commission.

Your review will coincide with the Secretary-General’s review of peace operations and the Global Study to assess progress in implementing resolution 1325 (2000).  The work and outcomes of these three reviews, and their follow-up, should be complementary, and in my view, mutually reinforcing.

These reviews come at a time of complex threats to peace, security and development.  They provide us with an important opportunity to sharpen and re-shape our thinking and our actions.

We owe it to the people we serve to ensure that we are bold, ambitious, and above all, effective in our approach to modern-day peacebuilding.  I urge Member States to be open, candid and constructive in their assessment of the peacebuilding challenges and potentials.

I would just like to add that, when we look at a conflict, the life of a conflict, we have a tendency to focus on the middle section of that life of a conflict — when you are at the “CNN stage” — when you are at the stage of suffering and taking urgent decisions on missions — peacebuilding and peacekeeping operations.  I think we need all to think of extending that attention to the pre-stage and the post-stage.  The life of a conflict which is discovered at the first vibrations on the ground — that is when we should start to act.  And then, like the convalescence of a patient, at the end of a conflict with ceasefires and so forth, we need to know that there is post-conflict work to be done, so that we don’t get back to the vicious cycle of conflict.

We need a solid commitment from all sides to fulfil the original vision for the peacebuilding structures and to improve the UN system’s support for countries emerging from conflict.

This could make the difference, the crucial difference, between peace or continuing conflict for millions of people around the world.  This is an opportunity the United Nations and its Member States should not miss.

Sepp Blatter/FIFA need a village to race it – Qatargate continues.

There is an African proverb which is saying: It takes a village to race a child. Why do I start with that? Well, it’s a just two days before the 2014 World Cup in Brazil begins in Sao Paolo. Let me say it’s seven points to adress FIFA with and also their president Sepp Blatter. So here we go..

First, when money talks to the main body of Football – FIFA. Starts with a suspicion from Sony, Adidas, Coca-Cola, Visa and Hyundai/Kia are asking that the process of the bid to Qatar was done without graft and corruption (BBC, 2014). This they do is to save face, because Sony and the other five companies want to share the spoils of a happy event. Not being part of sports activity that is sending the wrong message which doesn’t fit the companies.

Second, CAF is mad. CAF answered with: “that the authors of this smearing and defamatory campaign against African football leaders are brought to book”. Also responded with:” its total and unreserved support to all wrongfully incriminated Africans (..) [We] Condemn the strategy of using African sport movements and its leaders as scapegoats by those who are trying at all cost to acquire a good conscience for themselves”. Issa Hayatou is denying the accusations that of recent (Afrikansoccer, 2014). We all expected this kind of answers. Nobody wants to say their getting gifts and paid to vote a certain way. That the Asian Football body hasn’t answered as hard as CAF is more astonishing considering that Bin Hammam was leading that Football Body at the time of the bid. But hat is just me.

Third, Sepp Blatter the chief of FIFA is in heavy weather. He is attacking anything that moves in his sight which isn’t showing him either love or money. Attack one is that British Media where he claim them trying to demolish FIFA and his presidency. Where his quoted with this: “Once again there is a sort of storm against FIFA relating to the Qatar World Cup. Sadly there’s a great deal of discrimination and racism and this hurts me. It really makes me sad”. To address the British press: “we have seen what the British press has published,’ he said. ‘I don’t know what the reasoning is behind this but we must maintain unity” (Lawton, 2014). Somebody need give Sepp a hug. Then he needs a straight talk of the facts on the ground. This not anything of what he believes it is. It’s true that he is under fire. The flame is burning hot and not giving him peace. Blatter thought that the issue of the sun of Qatar would die away. That the special vagina stadium and bid would bite him in his behind is sure something that Blatter never thought would happen, since he is chief and nobody refuse his actions or decisions. That the British is pissed over losing the bid is sure something we all knew by now. It isn’t even relevant at this point. That is just a fact that he can use against them, but certainly they use all the information and sources to address it. To make sure that next time they place a bid they should have a fair chance of getting the almighty Football World Cup.

Fourth, the deaths of foreign workers in Qatar have already made the reputation of the host nation as bad investment and not a joyful place into ruins. In May Bloomberg reported of the deaths of 164 Nepali, 450 Indian and estimated total death into the numbers of 4000 during the whole building period in Qatar (Boudway, 2014). If nothing gets done by this, it’s already to many lives lost for us who loves this event. Nobody should die while building the stadiums and infrastructure. It’s insane and wonder what powers is to be to let this happen. True there has been reporting of this, but the laws of foreign guest workers in Qatar should be fixed, mended made sure of their safety and also pay for their work. But that might happen in a dream world.

Sixth, resurrection of the confederation cup demonstration has returned. In Sao Paolo the metro workers suspended their work for two days.  On Monday this ended with clashes with Police. Something sure FIFA doesn’t need before the joyous occasion. FIFA wouldn’t like that the metro stops before the opening match (Watson, 2014). Sure this doesn’t look good, if the fans don’t arrive to make a big noise at the match, then it’s like losing one of the feel-good factors of the tournament. We all know that, but everybody understands the Metro Workers union since they just want enough money to fit with inflation in Brazil.

Seventh, Sepp Blatter’s main position as President isn’t as solid anymore. A few European Football chairmen are asking the big man to step down. Greg Dyke of FA, Michael Van Praag of Dutch FA is taking this position against Blatter (Penderville, 2014). There must be a bad day to Sepp, but he has made this stew. So now it is time to eat it.

It takes a village to raise a kid the proverb, the kid is FIFA and Sepp Blatter. We need to raise the kid together somehow with the means and knowledge we have. We all can see the issues in both Brazil and coming events of Qatar. There are enough things and actions to question and we should put it into order. The bad press and issues should be solved in public not in hidden rooms of Geneva. There will be transparency to make sure that FIFA does the right thing and acts as a proper

Links:

AfrikanSoccer (10.06.2014): CAF General Assembly slams media over Qatar 2022 bribing allegations. http://www.afrikansoccer.com/2014/06/caf-general-assembly-slams-media-over-qatar-2022-bribing-allegations/

BBC (09.06.2014): Qatar 2022: FIFA sponsors back corruption investigation.

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/football/27751265

Boudway, Ira (14.05.2014): The 2022 FIFA World Cup Could Be Deadly for Qatar’s Migrant Workers. http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-05-14/the-2022-fifa-world-cup-could-be-deadly-for-qatars-migrant-workers

Lawton, Matt, Daily Mail, (09.06.2014): You are RACISTS – as World Cup corruption scandal engulfs FIFA, a brazen Sepp Blatter lashes out at his critics in British media. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/worldcup2014/article-2653335/Sepp-Blatter-calls-British-media-racists-World-Cup-corruption-scandal-engulfs-FIFA.html

Penderville, Liam Mirror.co.uk, (10.06.2014): Sepp Blatter row: Senior UEFA, English FA and Dutch FA officials call for FIFA President to stand down.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/news/sepp-blatter-row-senior-uefa-3671669#ixzz34Go8WZvX

Watson, Katy, BBC, (10.06.2014): Sao Paulo metro strike suspended for two days.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-27761723

World Cup 2014 Football songs

Last time it was Waka Waka and K’naan. This time it’s this:

A weak ass fotball song! Weak not into it, the communisme kinda song with samba doesn’t mix. Sorry Pitbull, but you and Jennifer Lopez sure earned yourself a fat check for this one! Next:

Shakira did this last time with ‘Waka Waka’. This is more Euro-techno and really the sound of 2014. Sure it’s going to played like crazy more then Pitbull I hope, still I wouldn’t myself buy this tune on Itunes. Taste of music is different. But someday I might listen to it because I am playing FIFA game where they have added this song on the football list – lalala. Next:

Yet another pop triade with Brazil flags and samba. It’s better then Pitbull and J.Lo in this contest it’s not a victory. I still prefer Shakira. For the simple reason it’s has the soccer stars in the song. Though none of them is ‘We’re coming home’ theme. “time of your life” .. World Cup is the biggest soccer event every for you! But come on beautiful girl! Next:

Coca-Cola had last time the best. It seems like their tradition to drop good tunes for marketing purposes and sell more cans of Coke in the time of the World Cup!

And Yes! If you wonder, I won’t do the national tracks of each of the countries. Because if you think about. I have no plans of checking all of those out or spend time searching youtube to find all of thoose tracks.

This was me and my tale of Football songs.. Who’s up next? Kidding!

Peace

FIFA and the ‘Qatar World Cup of 2022’ reissue of power play.

Sepp Blatter, the head honcho of FIFA recently told the press, that it was a mistake to award and give the World Cup of Football to Qatar in 2022(Gibson, 2014). The saga continues to spark unwanted events.

A few days before there were reports of deaths of workers, usually foreign construction workers who work on the new stadiums in the heat of Qatar. The report from Bloomberg, said that 8 workers had lost their lives during the last 30 days. This is alarming and worrying (Boundway, 2014). If this was sad enough news E: 60 reports that 184 Nepali workers have lost their lives in the past year. In 2013 India reported that of their emigrants had the striking numbers of 450 during that year, alone (Boundway, 2014). This extremely high numbers and should be a concern for FIFA and the government of Qatar.

2 days ago new fresh reports and allegations. This is on the important matter on: “how the deal was struck”  and then they got the World Cup in 2022. Not that’s this is the first time corruption into assigning and voting for the venues place has come to light. Therefore when BBC’s David Bond told: “of £3m payments to various football officials” all over the African continent for the bid (Bond, 2014). It wasn’t like snowing in the summer, more like rain in the fall. We expected it to be told and now it’s found!

With these allegation it’s was about time that the FIFA executive Issa Hayatou called them “ridiculous” and “fanciful”. The African federation answered that Hayatou never gotten gifts or trips for the vote. Another African football leader also accused and later disbanded from charge the Nigerian Amos Amadou after corruption scandals (Imray, 2014). The Qatar Organizing Committee says to this: “always upheld the highest standards of ethics and integrity in its successful bid”(…)“The right to host the tournament was won because it was the best bid and because it is time for the Middle East to host its first FIFA World Cup”(Kagel, 2014).

So with these new allegations and bad press. We can wonder how much more of this must happen before its weight is too heavy to carry for the governing body of Football. The FIFA has already enough issues with the current World Cup in Brazil. Which the own population has strike against on several occasions, even in the country where all the favelas has kids who has a fun time playing the magical game. Not so much power play of joy anymore! The momentum of the occasion might change the feeling, but for now – it’s not like it should be.. We all know what I mean!

Wonder if we will have fun seeing the game played in the heat of dessert land of Qatar. Qatar games are surely bloody red and also by everybodies reckoning it’s a bit tainted by the paying of votes. There has been issues before inside FIFA which has led to Jack Warner’s downfall from the throne of Caribbean football and leave the role of being the Trinidad and Tobago’s FIFA executive. So I wonder, what happens next in the governing body of FIFA? But I doubt much. Well since the a lot of monies is at stake! It all looks better if it stays the same! There I said it: For FIFA if it all stay the same, the money keep pumping in and the executive get their cut. Then we’re just supposed to show a blind eye and then smile while watching the matches on TV. Will you do that or would you speak your mind to?

Links:

Bond, David, BBC, (31.05.2014): Qatar World Cup: ‘£3m payments to officials’ corruption claim: http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/football/27652181

Boundway, Ira, BloombergBusinessweeek (14.05.2014): http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-05-14/the-2022-fifa-world-cup-could-be-deadly-for-qatars-migrant-workers

Gibson, Owen, theGuardian.co.uk (16.05.2014): http://www.theguardian.com/football/2014/may/16/sepp-blatter-qatar-2022-world-cup-mistake

Imray, Gerald, AP-Lillooet News (02.06.2014): http://www.lillooetnews.net/sports/world/fifa-vice-president-denies-receiving-favours-for-voting-for-qatar-to-hold-2022-world-cup-1.1100860

Kagel, Jenna, Policymic.com (01.06.2014 – A New Corruption Scandal Could Put Qatar’s 2022 World Cup in Jeopardy: http://www.policymic.com/articles/90283/fifa-corruption-scandal-could-put-qatar-s-2022-world-cup-in-jeopardy