Sudan: Is this the final days of the Sovereign Council? [and a new TMC takeover?]

To join our ranks for:

Completing the revolution and liquidating the control of Al-Bashir’s security committee, not to protect or continue the damaged transitional authority. Ending the partnership with the Military Council and canceling the constitutional document to form a purely civilian government in accordance with the goals of the December Revolution. A new civil authority of competencies committed to the line and goals of the December revolution and not an extension of the buried partnership authority. Free revolutionaries, we will continue the journey, assembly flags, September 26, 2021 AD” (Sudanese Professionals Association, 26.09.2021).

Sources in Sudan told me that the army has removed security from protecting the dismantling committee. Some claim that the security forces are making a point that they’re the protectors of the revolution. Others fear a more cynical ploy. Lots still unclear” (Matnashed, 26.09.2021).

Today, we are getting news of tensions between the civilians and the military wing of the Sovereign Council. This is all happening after the foiled coup mere days ago on the 21st September 2021. As there was several of generals and high ranking officials involved in it.

So, now the military leaders and generals within the Sovereign Council, the remaining Transitional Military Council (TMC) leaders are acting as sole custodians of the state. Which was partly the fear when they had the majority and the control of the Sovereign Council. As the civilian revolutionary groups under the Forces of Freedom and Change (FFC) which one of them was the Sudanese Professionals Association. They are not retaliating and reacting to the news.

Because of all of this. There is now clear speculations that the TMC is planning to get their own “appointed” civilian leaders within the Sovereign Council. So, that they can control them and have total power. Instead of civilians who guards the revolution and it’s ideas. That would be a “bloodless coup” in favour of the TMC. Where they are securing their interests and power within the state. As well, as stifling the transition and prolonging the transition period.

We know the TMC has already acted, as they have suspended all meetings with civilian counterparts, plus taking away their security details. As they are accepting violence and vandalism happening to their homes.

Clearly this is planned and scheduled, as the Al-Burhan and Hemeti blamed civilians right after the foiled coup attempt as well. Even when the ones arrested was part of the military and not civilian leaders. At least not the ones that published to the general public or in International media. That’s why this is a political ploy to take total control and dismiss civilian transition from military rule.

In Port Sudan tonight protesters was saying: “Leave, leave Burhan, we don’t need you Burhan”.

That says it all and the TMC is not there because of the people, but because they arms and guns.

One of the founders, Muhammad Al-Faki Suleiman of FFC has said this: “This bitter contract that we swallowed and called the partnership, we did not accept it except because after two years we will go to the polls, eager for the stability of this country. We will not allow anyone to manipulate the fate of this country, and we will not allow anyone to alter this equation as he wants”.

It is interesting times ahead and it will not be easy. Peace.

Sudan: A foiled coup attempt in Khartoum

“There was a coup attempt to take over power and it has been contained.” (Sudan Armed Forces).

The Sovereign Council’s biggest test to date have been this morning. As several of army commanders had a mutiny and went into coup d’état mode. There been reports of 40 generals or high-ranking commanders arrested because of their activity this morning.

As the soldiers and tanks are now on the streets. It has already been questions and doubt about the current rulers. As the bread prices are running high and the lack of civilian transition. The Sovereign Council has sort of betrayed the revolution and they did so through military protocol.

The ringleader of the coup is said to be General Abdel-Baqi Bakrawi. He and his associates will face investigation and punishment now. The foiled coup will be a stain on his legacy. However, people say these men, the former allies of former President Omar Al-Bashir is behind it. Therefore, they grow tired of the Al-Burhan and Hamdok transitional government.

We know there was pressure and that this transitional government was fragile. Even with all the military might and capacities within the ranks of the Sovereign Council. As the generals and leaders of old was there. It was not like it was most civilians there or appointed. Neither, was there many from the Forces of Freedom and Change (FFC). That’s why the public support for the Sovereign Council might not be as strong as it is perceived either.

We also know that Ethiopia have had a violent approach to the border conflict closely tied to the Tigray region. Therefore, some is even speculating that the Addis Ababa rulers have supported and tied into the foiled coup. However, that is mere speculation at this point. However, there have been seen and taken arms going to rebels from Ethiopia crossing into Sudan. This has been happening in recent months and therefore the word of mouth spreads fast.

Time will tell what is happening and what will go down. Some is afraid and thinks this is the first of many. As there is a will and someone might even succeed. We cannot know that today, but this is what happens when you let the military in control of a government. Instead of elections, you get coups and new commanders who wants to rise to power.

The Sovereign Council needs to prove its worth and value. They cannot skate away on old promises and lack of results. Peace.

Sudan: Despite Implementation of Peace Agreement, Insecurity Persists in Darfur, Sudan Sanctions Committee Chair Tells Security Council (14.09.2021)

The Panel of Experts on the Sudan updated the Committee about the implementation of the Juba Peace Agreement, regional dynamics, the status of the armed groups in the region.

NEW YORK, United States of America, September 14, 2021 – Measures ‘No Longer in Line with Reality on the Ground’ Delegate Stresses

While Sudan’s post-revolution reforms continue to register progress and peace is largely holding, implementation of the 2020 Juba Peace Agreement remains slow and lingering intercommunal violence continues to plague the Darfur region, the Security Council heard today as the head of that country’s sanctions committee presented his quarterly update.

Sven Jürgenson (Estonia), briefing the 15-member organ in his capacity as Chair of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1591 (2005) concerning the Sudan, outlined developments for the period 14 June to 14 September. He said the Committee held its first in-person informal consultation since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic and received the Sudan Panel’s interim report as well as a briefing on its contents. It later issued a press release.

Among other things, he said the Panel of Experts on the Sudan updated the Committee about the implementation of the Juba Peace Agreement, regional dynamics, the status of the armed groups in the region, intercommunal violence and human rights violations. Both the Government of the Sudan and the Juba Peace Agreement signatory movements continued to promote peace in the Sudan, including Darfur. However, the Panel made clear that — except for power-sharing arrangements — the Peace Agreement’s implementation has encountered delays. Meanwhile, the regional context remains mainly favourable to the peace process in Darfur.

Regarding the activities of armed movements, he said the Panel informed the Committee that the Sudan Liberation Army/Abdul Wahid (SLA/AW) remains present in the Jebel Marra region. At the same time, there was some sporadic fighting during the reporting period in northern Jebel Marra between SLA/AW and Government forces. Mining revenues have helped SLA/AW build up its capability in terms of recruitment, training and weapons. In addition, the Juba Peace Agreement signatory movements have returned to Darfur, some of them engaging in recruitment, while also keeping a number of troops and weapons in Libya.

He reported the Panel’s assertion that, due to delays in the Peace Agreement’s implementation, insecurity persists in many areas of Darfur. “Despite the Government’s commitment to improve security, the Panel reported that intercommunal violence, attacks against civilians by the SLA/AW factions, human rights violations, including acts of sexual violence in conflict were recorded,” he said. In that context, enhancing the protection of civilians in Darfur continues to be of paramount importance and needs to be expedited. The Panel also cited the need for more efforts to address the underlying drivers of the Darfur conflict, including competition for scarce local resources.

Turning to the travel ban and asset freeze, he said the Panel reported that implementation remains a challenge. A new instance of a travel ban violation occurred when a listed individual, Musa Hilal, travelled to Chad in April 2021. Reiterating that the targeted measures and the arms embargo on Darfur serve the sole purpose of helping the Sudan to achieve peace, he said the Committee is assisting with the upcoming review of sanctions in order to best support the country in that ultimate goal.

Responding to that briefing, Abdalla Adlan Ali Ombali (Sudan) reiterated his Government’s longstanding and principled position rejecting the sanctions imposed on the country. “These sanctions are no longer in line with the reality on the ground in Darfur, compared to 2005 when they were imposed,” he stressed, adding that it is incumbent upon the Council to address the new reality in his country. Indeed, the situation in Darfur continues to improve every day, with a ceasefire currently holding since it was first announced. The Government is implementing the Juba Peace Agreement, it has deployed a joint civilian protection force, and it is working to address the challenges facing internally displaced persons and refugees.

Adding that the Government continues to engage the SLA/AW faction and prevent intercommunal violence, he pointed out that it is also working to promote and protect the rights of children. Dedicated units for the protection of women and children have been deployed throughout the Sudanese Armed Forces, which are responding swiftly to instances of violence. Underlining the need to speed up the capacity-building of the Sudanese Forces to combat the activities of armed groups, he said lifting the sanctions will help Sudan more quickly become a country that lives in peace throughout its borders. The Government will continue to cooperate closely with the Council, but it will not accept any sanctions expansions that do not meet with its approval, including measures that are unreasonable or that cannot be measured against clear benchmarks. “We expect to be treated fairly and objectively,” he emphasized.

A memo to the AU: If IGAD can’t do it, why do you think Obasanjo can do it?

The African Union (AU) has today appointed the former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo as the High Representative for the Horn of Africa. The African Union Commissioner might have the best interests at heart here and the will to make a difference. However, at this point of time and with the leaders at today. This appointment will go nowhere.

The AU could have appointed a saint, a maverick and a superstar to this role. They could have had the best negotiator even known to mankind and it still wouldn’t resolve anything. In 2021 and with the current head of states. There will not be any will or resolve to silence the guns. No, that’s not happening.

Mr. Obasanjo is getting another pay-check. He is getting another retirement-fund and additional high ranking official status. Being a diplomat and getting VIP treatment in Addis Ababa. He will not lack the perks and the bottle-service. However, that will not change the matters on the ground.

If there would have been a possible change, the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) would have made some significant moves. The IGAD is already there to do this and ensure stability on the Horn of Africa. As IGAD says itself: “IGAD to be the premier Regional Economic Community (REC) for achieving peace and sustainable development in the region. Mission: Promote regional cooperation and integration to add value to Member States’ efforts in achieving peace, security and prosperity”.

So with that in mind, the Horn of Africa should already have an organization and the apparatus to achieve peace and security. Now, that is futile and lacking. That’s why the AU is boosting it’s operation and hiring Obasanjo to make things look good. However, he will not go anywhere or get anything done. At least nothing substantial or fruitful. Except for cashing-in and enjoying VIP treatment.

Obasanjo will get the cold-shoulder, which Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok has gotten. Not to mention the double-speaking and erratic diplomatic cables of Mogadishu. Which we have seen in coordination with the AU Chair of the Year Felix Tshisekedi. When Hamdok have gotten silent treatment from Addis Ababa. Not like Asmara will be friendly either. Djibouti President Ismaïl Omar Guelleh will be all smiles, as he has all the major powers having military bases and that’s why he feels untouchable.

The former Nigerian President have to magic. He has to show all of his tricks of his trade and negotiations. As there are several of conflicts and not lacking of guns in rotation. There are so much hurt, pain and social animosity. That it isn’t a steady and strong Horn of Africa at this point. No, everyone is pinned in one conflict or another.

If it is battle of clans within Somalia. If it is Al-Shabab sending suicide bombs or retaliating at the AMISOM mission somewhere. If it is Issa-Somali militias targeting Ethiopian regions of Ogaden and Afar. If it is all the Liberation Fronts going to war against the Tripartite Alliance within Ethiopia. If it is the skirmishes and the simmering conflict between Ethiopia and Sudan over the Al-Fashqa triangle. Together with the genocidal war in the Tigray region of Ethiopia. There is no stop of warfare and conflicts currently happening.

That is why Obasanjo have not only a mountain to climb but several actually. In combination with the elections in Somalia. There is no shortlist of hurdles and hardships. If he will even touch on those and not only smile for pressers. It would be likely to have low-level consultations and meetings. However, he will not gather all the hopeful and neither be allowed to meet all parties. No, the states involved rather wants to annihilate and get rid of enemies. They are not willing to talk to them. That’s why IGAD has failed and why Obasanjo will be left astray as well.

Obasanjo will be a nice-poster child for this. He will bring good publicity but not achieve anything. That is the outset and the ones around making sure of. It is not like the heads of state is changing in a matter of no-time and that these are suddenly becoming will partners of dialogue. Especially, when they haven’t considered or even tried before. That’s why the mission of the High Representative is futile.

He should call up IGAD and get their in-put. Because, there is nowhere to hide here and the snakes are ready to bite. Peace.

Sudan: Security Council Adopts Presidential Statement Recognizing Progress to Advance Peace, Security in Darfur Following Hybrid Operation Drawdown (02.08.2021)

The Council stressed the need for continued progress to consolidate peace and security.

NEW YORK, United States of America, August 2, 2021 – The Security Council today recognized the progress made in Darfur since 2007 to advance peace and security, following the complete drawdown of the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) on 30 June, as it looked forward to receiving an assessment of lessons learned from the experience no later than 31 October.

 

In a presidential statement (document S/PRST/2021/14) presented by the representative of India, Council President for August, the 15-member organ took note of the oral report delivered by the Under-Secretary-General for Operational Support on 27 July — titled “The Reports of the Secretary-General on Sudan and South Sudan” — which included details on UNAMID’s drawdown and liquidation phase.

Through the statement, the Council reiterated its call on Sudan’s Government — as well as the Juba Peace Agreement signatories and non-signatory armed opposition movements — to cooperate fully with the United Nations and the African Union during UNAMID’s liquidation phase, including by fully respecting all provisions of the Status of Forces Agreement of 9 February 2008.  It welcomed the 4 March signing of the Framework Agreement between the United Nations and Sudan, urging the Government to ensure that handed-over UNAMID team sites are used exclusively for civilian end-user purposes.  It also took note of the Operation’s near-completed efforts to destroy expired ammunition.

“The Security Council commends the people of Darfur for their resilience and cooperation with UNAMID to contribute to peace efforts,” members said through the statement, likewise commending the “unique partnership” between the United Nations and the African Union and the contribution of troop- and police-contributing countries and donors in support of UNAMID’s mandate.

While recognizing improvements in security conditions in some areas of Darfur, the Council also stressed the need for continued progress to consolidate peace and security, including through comprehensive implementation of the Juba Peace Agreement.  It urged Sudan to swiftly implement its National Plan for Civilian Protection (document S/2020/429) and encouraged further steps to promote and protect women’s rights and their full, equal and meaningful participation in all social, political and economic aspects of life.  More broadly, it underscored the importance of continued support by bilateral, regional and multilateral partners.

The meeting began at 11:39 a.m. and ended at 11:40 a.m.

Sudan: UN-African Union Mission in Darfur in final shutdown phase (28.07.2021)

The mission has so far handed over some $41 million in facilities and equipment to local authorities.

NEW YORK, United States of America, July 28, 2021 – Practically all peacekeepers and staff have now left the hybrid UN-African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID), in line with its drawdown plan, a senior UN official told the Security Council on Tuesday.

Atul Khare, Under-Secretary-General for Operational Support, updated ambassadors on progress towards the mission’s closure and final liquidation, following the end of its mandate last December after 13 years protecting civilians uprooted by conflict.

Nearly 6,000 troops and police were repatriated from the Sudanese province ahead of the drawdown deadline of 30 June, and nearly 1,200 civilian staff were separated from the mission.

Expedited timelines achieved

The UN General Assembly recently approved nearly $80 million to support final closure no later than 30 June 2022.

Mr. Khare was in Sudan earlier this month, where he met with senior officials as part of efforts to ensure progress remains on track.

“All leaders shared their satisfaction at the successful achievement of the expedited timelines and discussed ways to resolve outstanding issues related to the liquidation and wider transition implications,” he reported.

Only a 360-strong Guard Unit remains at UNAMID to protect staff working on the exit, and the remaining UN assets, though primary responsibility for security rests with the Sudanese Government.

Remaining UN assets in Darfur are being disposed of in two phases, the first of which is already underway.

‘Enormous’ inventory list

The mission has so far handed over some $41 million in facilities and equipment to local authorities, but 10 of the 14 sites reportedly have suffered “varying degrees of destruction and theft”, which Mr. Khare called a major loss for local communities.

“I note that although authorities have made commitments to investigate these incidents, various Sudanese interlocutors have nevertheless suggested that these events resulted from underlying tensions among groups locally, along with concerns, whether real or perceived, surrounding equitable access to the facilities and equipment that was handed over,” he said.

Mr. Khare pointed to the potential of properties such as the UNAMID logistics base in El Fasher. Its numerous assets include more than 1,000 self-contained housing units, a hospital facility, a power generation and distribution network, a fuel storage depot, and water storage and purification equipment.

Hundreds of vehicles and other moveable property are also being stored there.

Pure water for a million

UNAMID also currently holds enough sodium hypochlorite salt to purify roughly seven billion litres of water, sufficient to meet the drinking and cooking needs for one million people for a year.

“It is critical that the Government of Sudan makes every effort to ensure that this enormous reserve of facilities and equipment is sustainably applied to national imperatives for civilian use,” he said.

Although some $8 million in equipment has been transferred to other UN field operations, or to a peacekeeping reserve in Italy, Mr. Khare stressed that the bulk will be donated to the Sudanese authorities for civilian use.

“To this end, during my recent visit to Sudan, I implored all government interlocutors to emphasize the immediate development of a single, holistic donation plan, with input and agreement from Government interlocutors at the national and local levels,” he said.

Handover challenges

The UN intends to gradually handover the El Fasher site to the authorities, starting in November, a process that would lead to the phased reduction of the Guard Unit.

“For all this to occur in an orderly and speedy fashion, I must raise the issue of the armed movements that have stationed forces around the El Fasher compound since the beginning of June,” Mr. Khare told the Council.

“After an initial period of confusion among these groups which led to the disruption of UNAMID movements, and, in some cases, harassment of United Nations personnel and vendors, movements have for the most part proceeded as needed in the recent weeks.”

However, he said coordination and leadership among these groups is critical if the liquidation process is to proceed smoothly “for the long-term sustainable benefit of Sudan and its people.”

Domestic Violence, Forced Marriage, Have Risen in Sudan: UN-Backed Study (20.07.2021)

Deteriorating economic conditions since 2020 and the COVID-19 pandemic have fuelled an increase in domestic violence and forced marriage in Sudan, a UN-backed study has revealed.

NEW YORK, United States of America, July 20, 2021 – Voices from Sudan 2020, published this week, is the first-ever nationwide qualitative assessment of gender-based violence (GBV) in the country, where a transitional government is now in its second year.

Addressing the issue is a critical priority, according to the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) and the Government’s Combating Violence against Women Unit (CVAW), co-authors of the report.

“The current context of increased openness by the Government of Sudan, and dynamism by civil society, opens opportunities for significant gains in advancing women’s safety and rights,” they said.

Physical violence at home 

The report aims to complement existing methods of gathering data and analysis by ensuring that the views, experiences and priorities of women and girls, are understood and addressed.

Researchers found that communities perceive domestic and sexual violence as the most common GBV issues.

Key concerns include physical violence in the home, committed by husbands against wives, and by brothers against sisters, as well as movement restrictions which women and girls have been subjected to.

Another concern is sexual violence, especially against women working in informal jobs, but also refugee and displaced women when moving outside camps, people with disabilities, and children in Qur’anic schools.

Pressure to comply

Forced marriage is also “prominent”, according to the report. Most of these unions are arranged between members of the same tribe, or relatives, without the girl’s consent or knowledge.

Meanwhile, Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) remains widespread in Sudan, with varying differences based on geographic location and tribal affiliation.  Although knowledge about the illegality and harmfulness of the practice has reached community level, child marriage and FGM are not perceived as key concerns.

Women’s access to resources is also severely restricted.  Men control financial resources, and boys are favoured for access to opportunities, especially education. Verbal and psychological pressure to comply with existing gender norms and roles is widespread, leading in some cases to suicide.

The deteriorating economic situation since 2020, and COVID-19, have increased violence, especially domestic violence and forced marriage, the report said. Harassment in queues for essential supplies such as bread and fuel has also been reported.

Data dramatically lacking 

Sudan continues to move along a path to democracy following the April 2019 overthrow of President Omar Al-Bashir who had been in power for 30 years.

Openly discussing GBV “has not been possible for the last three decades”, according to the report.

“GBV data is dramatically lacking, with no nation-wide assessment done for the past 30 years, and a general lack of availability of qualitative and quantitative data,” the authors said.

To carry out the assessment, some 215 focus group discussions were held with communities: 21 with GBV experts, as well as a review of existing studies and assessments.

Research was conducted between August and November 2020, encompassing 60 locations and camps, and the data was scanned through a software for qualitative analysis, followed a model first used in Syria.

Joint UN Press Release – UN agencies in Sudan reach conflict-affected communities in non-government-controlled areas for first time in a decade (13.06.2021)

United Nations humanitarian agencies have not been able to reach or provide life-saving assistance to support people in the five locations since 2011.

KHARTOUM, Sudan, June 13, 2021 – For the first time in ten years, United Nations humanitarian agencies have been able to access conflict-affected communities in the five non-governmental areas controlled by the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) El Hilu in South Kordofan and Blue Niles states of Sudan.

A series of humanitarian missions to the five isolated enclaves has concluded, just as renewed peace talks between the Government of Sudan and SPLM-N are ongoing in Juba, South Sudan. These five areas have largely been cut-off from support over the last decade and the missions’ findings indicate people are in dire need of improved food security, education, health, and water and sanitation services.

“This response marks a significant breakthrough in humanitarian access and response to conflict-affected communities previously unreached by UN humanitarian assistance. We commend the local efforts to support essential needs during the years of hardship. The humanitarian community in Sudan is calling for increased access and critically needed assistance to support these marginalized communities,” said Khardiata Lo N’diaye, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary General and Resident Coordinator/Humanitarian Coordinator in Sudan.

United Nations humanitarian agencies have not been able to reach or provide life-saving assistance to support people in the five locations since 2011, when conflict broke out between the Government of Sudan and the SPLM-N. Gaining humanitarian access to these communities provides a critical opportunity to improve lives and rebuild livelihoods.

“Communities in these areas have been struggling and surviving on little or nothing for a decade. Access for humanitarian agencies so they can increase their assistance to these vulnerable communities is critical. With improved food security and other opportunities, families will be able to reintegrate with the rest of Sudan and start to recover and rebuild,” said Eddie Rowe, United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) Country Director in Sudan.

WFP delivered 100 metric tons of nutritious biscuits for 25,000 school children in 83 schools on the five missions. This was the first assistance that people in these isolated areas had received from the UN in the last decade due to conflict and access constraints. A lack of food for students is one of the main challenges Page 2 of 3 in maintaining school enrolment in these isolated areas. Providing school meals is among the top priorities for WFP’s response as access continues to open.

“Whilst these missions mark a major development, we need to ensure that humanitarian access to children and communities in need is always granted. No conditions should ever be set on access; humanitarian assistance should be provided at all times and from all places to those that need it. Findings from this mission are bleak. These children have been entirely ‘left behind’. We have to act now to ensure these children have a future. Collectively, efforts must be made to ensure access and sustain and scale up assistance,” said Abdullah Fadil, UNICEF Representative in Sudan.

Expanding humanitarian access to SPLM-N controlled enclaves is crucial to providing urgent assistance to an estimated 800,000 people in these areas, who desperately need relief following years of isolation. Ramping up support will help stabilize communities and pave the path for peacebuilding efforts, while reinforcing the UN’s commitment to assist marginalised populations in Sudan.

The UN World Food Programme (WFP), the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF), the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), and the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) participated in missions over the last six weeks to five isolated areas in SPLM-N El Hilu controlled areas including Zozak and Amora in Blue Nile State and Kau/Nyaro, Rashad/New Tegali, and Western Jebels in South Kordofan State.

Opinion: Hemeti will challenge the Gods

The Commander of Rapid Support Forces (RSF) the former Janjaweed, General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo “Hemeti” is now challenging the state and the Sovereign Council. As he has not accepted to fully integrate the militia into the army.

RSP is already semi-autonomous, but by the act in government from 2017. The powers of the President can still command it. Therefore, the manner in which the law is created. It is creating a hard way to find ways to measure it. As it was an autonomous unit, but can be commanded by the President. This is maybe why the Sovereign Council and the Transitional Government want it under the same umbrella and not run as a separate outfit anymore. Especially, when the integrity and the power imbalance it might create.

The National Army is about 110,000 soldiers. While the RSF is about 20,000 militia men. Therefore, the size of RSF is substantial. Though, Hemeti is overplaying his hand here. Al-Burhan is the President (Chairman) of the Sovereign Council and Commander of the Armed Forces. By the laws of RSF Act of 2017. This means Al-Burhan can direct the RSF the way he see fit.

That means the RSF have to comply. The RSF Act was created for Al-Bashir’s wishes and whims. However, he is no longer the President and Commander-in-Chief. At this current time Al-Burhan runs as the President with Hamdok as the Prime Minister. Therefore, Hemeti which happens to be the Deputy of Al-Burhan doesn’t have the mandate to rebel against this.

Yes, the law is made in a way, which creates a lot of issues. Certainly, it was wilfully done so. In such a way that Al-Bashir could put all the blame on Hemeti and say he acted on his own merit. Instead of having to take responsibility for the actions made by the RSF in Darfur. Now, the same protocols are stifling the integration and furthering the process of a peaceful transition.

Hemeti doesn’t want to give up now. After years as a General and continued to rise to prominence. He has tried to make himself look more feasible and trade-off as a political broker. Still, everyone knows his past and willingness to dip into the coffers and get dirty. This man is willing to sell arms to Tchad or the Central African Republic. His willing to kill civilians and be a militia leader. So, it is not like his a man of protocol and a man of procedure. The RSF web page proves that as well.

Now, his willing to bet on the prestige and the ambition on his past. That he has the ability to overcome this obstacle and loose some sort of independence from the army. While the law, which he himself referred to recently. Is stating that the President can direct it and appoint it’s leadership. Meaning, if he Hemeti goes hard on this. Al-Burhan can in effect demote him and appoint someone else who is willing to accept the fate of the RSF in the SAF. That is just a mere fact and Hemeti should be aware of that himself.

His 20,000 combating a strong national army is a bloodshed in awaiting. Hemeti already have a war-torn Darfur and is known for his attacks on civilians there. Not like there is much love lost between the general public and the RSF. They still remember how the RSF was used to quell the revolution and civilians demonstrating against Al-Bashir. Therefore, he will not garner their love anytime soon.

This is why Hemeti should accept this plight. Swallow his pride and be happy that his even the Deputy in the Sovereign Council. That even with his horrific and depressing history, which he should have answered for in the court. The lives and the families he has hurt over the years. Still, he has rose to power and sitting at the high table. That man should feel lucky and not take this for granted.

Al-Burhan and the rest of the Sovereign Council is in it’s right to integrate and get the RSF into the SAF. That is just natural and not continue the agony of having it separate. Hemeti should understand that and just move-on. If he does… he will still have the reigns and be considered influential. However, if he gambles this all now.

Both the laws, the people and the Sovereign Council will dismiss him. There will be little to no redemption and what’s worse for him. That if they arrest him or start investigation of all of his acts during the years. The man will not see the light of day again. He will either be brought to court or get jail time. That is something you don’t want when you gotten this far…

However, Hemeti rather risk it, it seems and possibly loose it all. As he challenge the Gods, thinking they will forgive him. What a fool(!). This will only hurt him and he will not see it coming. Peace.

Opinion: A junta stays a junta

Breaking News: Colonel Assimi Göita takes over as President of Mali , Interim President and Prime Minister dismissed Less than 48 hours after dismissing the Interim President of the transition, Bah N’Daw, and his Prime Minister, Moctar Ouane, Colonel Assimi Goïta becomes the new President of the transition. Col Assimi Goïta says President Bah Ndaw and PM Moctar Ouane failed in their duties and were seeking to sabotage the country’s transition. On Wednesday, May 26, Bah N’Daw submitted his resignation and that of his Prime Minister to the man who had previously been his Vice President. The government, whose composition had been unveiled on 24 May a few hours before the military coup, was dissolved” (Red Lion Media, 26.05.2021).

There are sometimes the reality have to hit hard. There is sometimes a need to address things the way they are. This isn’t only for what’s happening in Bamako, but elsewhere. Let’s be clear. A junta stays a junta. No matter, if you appoint a civilian or a few technocrats to a “council” or a “cabinet” doesn’t make it a civilian government. It is still a junta government and the military is still in-charge.

That is what is happening these days in Bamako. This is what’s been happening in N’Djamena, Naypyidaw and Khartoum for instance. They have military government or junta’s, which Merriam-Webster defines like this: “a council or committee for political or governmental purposes especially : a group of persons controlling a government especially after a revolutionary seizure of power” (Merriam-Webster Dictionary – ‘Junta’ 26.May 2021).

We shouldn’t be shocked that Colonel Göita takes over power. That he sacks the ones who appointed a new cabinet without communicating or taking the CNSP into account. This is why the colonel did his second coup within a year. He used the army to topple the previous President and now he toppled another one. That’s because the civilians and the ones in transition didn’t follow the orders or act within the range of the military leadership.

This is just an act of an junta. Just because the junta appointed a former defence minister to President and allowed another civilian to become the Prime Minister. The main part of government was run by military commanders. This is why the underlings are still only there to create another image and be there to make the regime more feasible. The military leaders have no plans to leave power or give it away. They took power and has only selfish reasons to stay in office.

The junta will stay a junta. This will be the deal in Mali, Tchad, Sudan and Burma. These regimes are like this and they will not be accountable to anyone. They might seek to have some civilians within the transitional government or council. Just to make it legit and easily to sell to the international community.

It is just army commanders who wants to be the Executive and the Head of State. That is the reality. They didn’t need to win an election or get popular. These folks just used the guns and took power with their profession. The CNSP, the Sovereign Council and others are doing the same. They are boosting a transition. Hoping people are forgetting who they are and what sort of role they play. Putting in a few lucky technocrats (civilians) masking the cabinet/council. While promising after a long while to turn it into a civilian government.

The army says it saved the nation from corrupt individuals, tyrants and unpopular heads of state. The price is making them kings without any election. That’s why this is junta’s and they act like junta’s. We shouldn’t be surprised and just go after a few, but all of them. They are all using the mighty army in their favour. Instead of getting a government, which represent the general public in their republic.

We can either accept the trick or talk about it sincerely. Since, this isn’t a case only for Bamako. It is a problem and a way of governing, which happens across the world. Where the military and army commanders take control of the governing bodies and becomes the Head of State.

If you throw shade at Göita, do the same to General Kaka, President Al-Burhan and all the other fellas who has taken power this way. There is no difference, other than the way they have played it and making “mechanisms” for a transition. Which in the end favours them and gives them an advantage for a future election. That is it really.

A junta stays a junta. It doesn’t matter if they give a few plum jobs to a few technocrats. They are still army commanders running government and without a popular mandate from the public. Peace.