IGAD and OCHA – Joint Communique on South Sudan (9.2.2015)

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SG/A/1545-BIO/4692-PKO/470: Secretary-General Appoints David Gressly of United States as Deputy Special Representative for Democratic Republic of Congo (6.2.2015)

6 FEBRUARY 2015

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today announced the appointment of David Gressly of the United States as his Deputy Special Representative for Operations and the Rule of Law in the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO).

Mr. Gressly succeeds Abdallah Wafy of Niger, who had served as Deputy Special Representative for Operations and the Rule of Law since 2013 and as Police Commissioner and Head of the Mission’s police component from 2010 to 2013.  The Secretary-General is grateful for Mr. Wafy’s dedicated service during the past five years.

Mr. Gressly has broad experience working in peacekeeping missions, having served most recently as Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, and as the United Nations Resident Coordinator/Humanitarian Coordinator and Resident Representative of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA).

He also served as Regional Coordinator in the United Nations Mission in Sudan (UNMIS).  Prior to that, Mr. Gressly served for more than 20 years with the United Nations system, including as Regional Humanitarian Coordinator for the Sahel in Senegal.

Mr. Gressly holds a Master of Business Administration in international finance from the American Graduate School of International Management in Glendale, Arizona (United States).

Born in 1956, he is married and has six children.

Press Release: From the Atlantic to the Pacific, CSO across Africa welcomes AU Focus on Illcit Financial Flows

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SG/SM/16497-AFR/3063: Deeply Concerned about Deteriorating Security in Darfur, Secretary-General Urges Government, Armed Movements to Resume Dialogue towards Political Settlement (29.1.2015)

The following statement was issued today by the Spokesman for UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon:

The Secretary-General is deeply concerned about the deteriorating security situation in Darfur following reports of an escalation of hostilities between the Government of Sudan and the Darfur armed movements in Central Darfur and the resulting displacement of civilians.  The United Nations has confirmed that at least 36,000 civilians have been displaced in Darfur due to these hostilities.

He condemns the reported aerial bombardment and destruction of villages in the Golo locality of Central Darfur State on 27 January.

The Secretary-General urges the Government and the armed movements to exercise maximum restraint, without delay, and fully assume their responsibility to prevent further displacements and suffering of civilian populations, and resume dialogue to reach a political settlement to the Darfur conflict.

The Secretary-General also calls on the parties to the conflict to fully cooperate with the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) and the humanitarian partners in their efforts to protect and provide assistance to the civilian population of Darfur.

Tanzanian Presidential Communications – The Arusha Process re-entery to Peace-Talks between Dr. Rick Machar and President Salva M. Kiir – South Sudan (20th January 2015)

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WHO Press release: Ebola in West Africa: 12 months on (15.1.2015)

Note for the media
15 January 2015

One year after the first Ebola cases started to surface in Guinea, WHO is publishing this series of 14 papers that take an in-depth look at West Africa’s first epidemic of Ebola virus disease.

The papers explore reasons why the disease evaded detection for several months and the factors, many specific to West Africa, that fuelled its subsequent spread.

The most extensive papers trace events in each of the 3 most severely affected countries – Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. These countries shared many common challenges, shaped by geography, culture, and poverty, but each also faced, addressed and sometimes solved some unique problems.

Key events are set out chronologically, starting with the child who is believed to be the index case of this epidemic through to the Director-General’s commitment to steadfastly support affected countries until they reach zero cases.

The report also looks back at WHO’s response over the past 12 months, including the 9 August declaration of an international health emergency. It documents the many challenges faced by countries and the international community in dealing with the largest, longest, most severe, and most complex Ebola outbreak in history.

Throughout the report, the contributions of national governments and their many partners weave in, as does the great human misery caused by a terrible and terrifying disease.

Other papers provide insight into:

  • how the fast-track development of Ebola vaccines, treatments and rapid diagnostic tests is progressing, with no compromise of safety and efficacy standards;
  • how Senegal, Nigeria and likely Mali managed to contain imported cases and bring their own outbreaks under control;
  • the state of worldwide vigilance and preparedness, especially in countries targeted by WHO as being at greatest risk of an imported case.

The report also looks ahead. Based on what was learned during the previous year, what critical strategies and interventions will give countries and their partners the best chance of bringing the outbreaks under control?

WHO media contacts:

Gregory Hartl
Communications Officer
Telephone: +41 22 791 4458
Mobile: +41 79 203 6715
Email: hartlg@who.int

Tarik Jasarevic
Communications Officer
Telephone: +41 22 791 50 99
Mobile: +41 79 367 62 14
E-mail: jasarevict@who.int

MDC-T Press statement on the Opening of the 2015 Judicial Year (12.01.2015)

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Press Release: China urges efforts of G77 toward new type of international relations

Jan 9,2015 4:34 PM     Xinhua

UNITED NATIONS — A Chinese envoy on Jan 8 called on the Group of 77 (G77) to promote establishment of a new type of international relations with win-win cooperation at the core.

Liu Jieyi, China’s permanent representative to the United Nations, made the remarks at a ceremony at the U.N. headquarters where Bolivia handed over the rotating chairmanship of the G77 to South Africa.

“We are convinced that under the leadership of South Africa, the Group of 77 and China will continue to carry forward the fine tradition of solidarity and cooperation, and further promote cooperation and common development of the developing world,” he said.

The year 2015 marks the 70th anniversary of both the victory of the world anti-fascist war and the founding of the United Nations, Liu said, adding that it will be a year of great significance with milestones to be set: preserving world peace, promoting common development and establishing a new type of international relations with win-win cooperation at the core.

The ambassador said that as a committed member of the developing world, China greatly values the role of the G77 and cherishes the G77 plus China mechanism.

“We will as always endeavor to strengthen coordination and cooperation with all members of the Group and give all our support to the work of South Africa as the chair of the Group for the year 2015,” Liu said.

The G77, established in 1964, is now a coalition of more than 130 developing U.N. member states plus China, and has more than 60 percent of the world’s population.

The group is the largest intergovernmental organization of developing countries in the world body, aiming to promote collective economic interests and gain leverage within the international community.

The chairmanship, which sits atop the organizational structure of G77, rotates on a regional basis among countries in Africa, Asia-Pacific and Latin America and the Caribbean and is held for one year only.

Press Statement: IGAD Foreign Ministers arrive in Mogadishu for an extra-ordinary meeting (09.01.2015)

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African Water Facility to help tackle food insecurity, flooding and droughts in Uganda and South Sudan.

09/01/2015

The African Water Facility (AWF) announced on January 9, 2015 that it has offered a €1.97 million grant to the Nile Equatorial Lakes Subsidiary Action Program (NELSAP) to increase water availability for multiple purposes in the Nyimur region of Uganda and South Sudan. The grant will support the improvement of irrigated agriculture and food production, fisheries, electricity generation and sanitation as well as the prevention of flooding and droughts in the region.

The AWF grant will help prepare the construction of a multipurpose dam and a reservoir on the Nyimur River through feasibility studies, engineering design studies and environmental and social impact assessments. The planned infrastructure investment will allow approximately 5,105 ha of land to be irrigated through a community irrigation scheme, and enable 350 kW of electricity to be produced from a small hydropower facility. The project will directly benefit approximately 12,000 people.

The AWF will also support the mobilization of funds from donors through project preparation and fundraising activities such as donors’ roundtables.

“The project will improve the livelihoods of surrounding communities by reducing the ravages of flooding and droughts, as well as foster food and energy security and in the long run help consolidate peace and security in this fragile region” said AWF coordinator Akissa Bahri.

The Nyimur River runs through both South Sudan and Northern Uganda, an area plagued by conflict from the late 1980’s until 2004. Although the guns have generally fallen silent, the region is still considered fragile. The unrest in the region resulted in very low levels of investment and development of basic services or infrastructure. Agricultural production declined drastically during the period of turmoil and the current level of food insecurity is significant: in low yield seasons, 33% of the population in the area is dependent on food aid.

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