A review of the ‘Rise and Fall of Slaughterhouse’: The Roll-Out and the Album itself all in 1

The roll-out of the joint album by KXNG Crooked and Joell Ortiz ‘Rise and Fall of Slaughterhouse’ is finally over. There been releases of singles like “Vacancy” and “Backstage” which set the tone. The other members of Slaughterhouse got into their feelings and said they even felt “hurt”. This being Joe Budden and Royce Da 5’9”. These has gone wild on IG Live, interviews and even on own podcast twice. So, there is certainly pieces crushed … and certainly amplified the egos of all the members.

These two has gone off at the other MCs of the group, which haven’t dropped a major project since “Welcome To Our House” in 2012 on Shady Records. Since then we the fans has waited for an infamous project named “Glass House”, which would have been the third instalment from the group. Alas, we are now a decade later and we have a joint venture between 50% of the group.

The album is clear in the bar-for-bar and tells their story. However, this one isn’t going in deep. It is touching the end of Slaughterhouse. While Crook and Joell made it seems like they would bury the group and tell deep unknown stories of the group. Yes, there are joints that speaks of the loss, the costs and the lack of movement of the group.

The beats are fine and dandy. The two MCs are seasoned rappers and can drops puns like nothing. They are proving their ability and why they are respected word-smiths. Still, the album should have told more, but they were maybe acting with some caution. As they still see Royce and Budden as brothers. That would make sense?

The roll-out made it seem like it was deeper and would be the closure of the chapter. This is just giving snippets of it and not digging deeper into the reasons of the lack of any albums from Slaughterhouse.

We know the Slaughterhouse was a powerhouse and a promising group that had a shot to be fantastic. The two MCs on this album proves their skills and ability to write rhymes. These two proves that on the album. Still, they are not saying things we haven’t heard before. Yes, Joell are straight and feels betrayed by certain members, that they we’re his brother. That is proven by “Coastin’” by them both.

We clearly hearing the stories of how Joe Budden thinks his bigger than the rest of group. That story is coming out. As well, as Royce who didn’t want to move either. We don’t know if that is all true, but that’s the narrative the Two MCs are spinning. This is not shocking, as they have told similar things in advance.

While the “Still In My Feelings” feels like an upgraded version of the intro to Joell Ortiz “In My Feelings” from Autograph. So, this is a joint that Ortiz already has published and verse he has released twice with only adding Crooked onto it. That was a bit weak of a man like Joell. This is re-issuing what you have released and put it on a joint album…

Look Mama” is the natural track of MCs who has made it and wants to give thanks to their mother. It is a nice joint and shows how the two went from poverty into riches. What it also shows their grateful words to their mothers. This is a nice track, but on a farewell of Slaughterhouse seems like an add on.

The end “Sorry” fits the “Coastin’”, “Backstage”, “Fukglasshouse” and “Vacancy” which all fits the pattern of ending it. While there are other tracks that doesn’t goes that deep. The production is tight. The beats are fitting the moods and the verses.

It is a well-built album. This album was made to seem to be a total closure of Slaughterhouse. The House was forclosed and the logo was even burned in the “Vacancy” music-video. However, it seems more like a moment of airing out some grievances, but not going really hard at it. The two made sure not to bury all bridges or throw to many punches. It is not like they tried to “Second Round K.O” or “Vaseline” it. The intent was clear not to make diss-tracks or brutally assault the other members.

However, it is short of stories and of further reflection on the matter. It has some sound-bites and some cuts, which can spark tension between the members. Nevertheless, it is not too deep or reflected. The album isn’t filled with bars that could envision or be able to tell another narrative. Than the stories, which was already out there.

That’s why the promise of closure and end is sort of still out there. This here is a beginning of an end, but not the final one. Not in my perspective as a fan and a listener. Who has enjoyed albums and projects from all four in the Slaughterhouse. That’s why I wanted more out of this here. The tracks that wasn’t about Slaughterhouse directly could have been leftover tracks from “H.A.R.D” for all I know. So, they just traded this and made it a full LP.

Still, this is an album for any rap and hip hop fan. Especially, the ones that has followed Slaughterhouse and the MCs associated with that. I will not consider this one a classic or such. It tells a story, shows the skills of the two, but it is not whole. Neither does it seem to poignant enough. Which is sad… because they could, but then they would totally destroy any chance of friends, collaborations or even being considered associates with the other two. That’s why I think they didn’t go all in or wrote rhymes that could spark a full out beef. Because, they just want to shed a light on why there haven’t been a release of any album since 2012. Peace.

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