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House of Lords recommend flexible approach to migration because of Brexit!

The United Kingdom and their tales of glory, the former Empire and giant industrial hub of Europe, clearly have forgotten their place and trying to distance themselves from Europe. It will not be as easy as the Brexiteers and the Conservative Party. The Tories has to find their way while the negotiations are continuing with the European Union (EU). The leaving will cause grand-issues with migrations and also how the borders will close or be have different visa procedures. Therefore, the labour market and businesses will be hurt by this. Not only the direct trading between the UK and EU, but who get ability to be hired and who cannot come and work in low-educated jobs and low payed jobs. This is what the House of Lords looked into, and it is important to look into the matter. Because the matter isn’t straight forward. The answer is more flexible than what the UKIP and Brexit supporters inside the Conservative Party. Just take a look!

Labour and Immigration:

EU nationals make up 7 per cent of the total workforce. The Labour Force Survey provides estimates of the number of EU nationals working in particular sectors and the proportion they make up of the overall total. For example, the concentration of EU nationals is significantly higher in some sectors, reaching 14.2 per cent in accommodation and food services” (House of Lords, P: 19, 2017).

We strongly recommend that the Government develop a new immigration policy for implementation once the UK has left the European Union. It should consult on the needs of business and on a

time frame for implementing the new policy. Any new immigration system should not make an arbitrary distinction between higher skilled and lower-skilled work on the basis of whether a job requires an undergraduate degree. British businesses must have access to expertise and skills in areas such as agriculture and construction that would at present be categorised as lower-skilled occupations” (House of Lords, P: 24, 2017).

Lack of Migration workers – higher cost for consumers:

As some of our witnesses highlighted, pay is not the only consideration but there are now a large number of migrant workers in some sectors who will not easily be replaced by domestic workers. Competitive labour markets will see some price adjustment in response to labour shortages, with an associated increase in local labour supply. However, in some sectors, business models may have to change. As noted in the example of agriculture, this is likely to lead to higher prices for consumers” (House of Lords, P: 26, 2017).

We warned in our 2008 report on immigration that employment of migrant workers could lead to businesses neglecting skills and training for British workers. As the example of nursing highlights, these fears appear to have been realised. Training for the domestic workforce needs urgently to be given a higher priority” (House of Lords, P: 28, 2017).

The Government must also acknowledge that in order to achieve some of its other policy objectives, such as building 225,000–275,000 new homes each year, lower-skilled immigration may be required in the medium term to provide the necessary labour” (House of Lords, P: 31, 2017).

The objective of having migration at sustainable levels is unlikely to be best achieved by the strict use of an annual numerical target for net migration. Instead, such a target runs the risk of causing considerable disruption by failing to allow the UK to respond flexibly to labour market needs and economic conditions, as the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union has suggested is necessary. The objective of reducing migration to sustainable levels should be implemented flexibly and be able to take account of labour market needs, in particular during the implementation period” (House of Lords, P: 37, 2017).

You can easily see and envision the lack of agricultural short-term workers for heavy and low-paying jobs. This has to be hired by others and if they are UK citizens and such, they will not work for slice, but wont the whole pizza. That is why the end-game will be more cost for the consumer for what they in the past paid less for. Since the salaries of the UK citizens over the migrant worker are vastly different. Also, the possible problems of getting enough nursers and other educated to take the low-paying civil servants positions needed in the National Health Service. The House of Lords report can really show the implications of the migration and labour market the Brexit will have. Unless, the UK are planning such a soft border and open for EU nationals, than the changes will not be like night and day, but more like a similar day and just a little bit later on the same day.

Then the whole anti-Europe parades and campaigning lost. Since the Brexit became a shell of what it was supposed to be. It will be good for Europe and a pain for the Right in the UK. Certainly, the Farage’s of the world will hate this sort of report. Since the needed flexibility flexes against the will of the UKIP and Brexiteers amongst the Tories. They will be attacking this sort of report. Even if the Lords are impartial and uses accurate data. This shows the estimated effects of Brexit and the words of the Lords wasn’t dim! It can bring hope to Europe, but if the government will follow the recommendations and advise from the Lords; is something that time only can tell. Since the Tories would be showing weaker will to implement the idea behind the Brexit election, if they follow the advice of the Lords. That is not a easy bargain, but who said it would be? Peace.

Reference:

House of Lords – HL 11 – ‘Brexit and the Labour Market’ (21.07.2017)

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